NOVEMBER 2-5, 2017

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in partnership with the MADISON PUBLIC LIBRARY FOUNDATION

As You Wish - Cary Elwes - <span class="date-display-single">02/13/2015 - 6:30pm</span>

As You Wish

02/13/2015 - 6:30pm

Monona Terrace - Lecture Hall

Celebrate Valentine's Day with one of the greatest love stories of our time.  Cary Elwes, Westley in The Princess Bride, has written AS YOU WISH, the ultimate account of the film that has captured the hearts of viewers for generations with never-before-told stories from Cary and his extraordinary co-stars.  Join the Wisconsin Book Festival for a screening of the Princess Bride at 6:30, followed by a conversation with Cary Elwes about the inconceivable secrets behind the making of the film.

 

The Princess Bride, based on William Goldman’s remarkable novel, has stood the test of time as both a family favorite and cult classic for nearly three decades. Only a modest hit in theaters in 1987, the movie gained popularity on VHS, and is now ranked by the American Film Institute as one of the top 100 Greatest Love Stories, and by the Writers Guild of America as one of the top 100 screenplays of all time. The film’s timeless love story and brilliantly funny screenplay have endured, proving to be just as relevant and charming for fans today as they were at its premiere. 

 

Now for the first time ever, Cary Elwes—the man behind the film’s dashing hero, Westley—gives fans a look inside the making of The Princess Bride. Only 23-years-old during filming, this book is Cary’s first-hand account of the making of the film that kick-started his career, and the many influential people he met along the way. The book is chock-full of interviews with Cary’s legendary co-stars—including Robin Wright, Wallace Shawn, Billy Crystal, Fred Savage, Christopher Guest, Carol Kane, Christopher Sarandon and Mandy Patinkin—as well as an epilogue from producer Norman Lear, and a foreword by director Rob Reiner, all of whom, along with writer William Goldman, share incredible stories behind how the movie was made and what effect it had on their lives. From his casting in the midst of possible radioactive fallout to never before revealed anecdotes about the lovable André the Giant; these and many more wonderful behind-the-scenes stories are bound to wow any fan. Readers will also get to enjoy exclusive photographs from Rob Reiner’s and Norman Lear’s personal collections, plus plenty of set secrets and hilarious backstage tales that will leave you running to press play all over again including: 

  • How Cary suffered a broken toe while playing around with an all-terrain vehicle.  
  • Why Rob and Cary had to leave the set during Billy Crystal’s scenes portraying “Miracle Max.” 
  • How Wallace Shawn, who played the conniving Sicilian Vizzini, was nearly crippled by anxiety because he believed another actor was the producers’ first choice for the role.
  • Why Robin Wright was the last person to be cast in the film.
  • How Andre the Giant supplied the set with crates of food he brought back from France after paying a visit to his family.     
  • Details of how Mandy Patinkin and Cary trained for 2 months to prepare for The Greatest Sword Fight in Modern Times.
  • Details of an alternate ending to the movie with Buttercup, Westley, Inigo, and Fezzik. 
  • Details of how President Clinton became a fan of the movie

 

This event is free and open to the public.  Seating is general admission and will be limited by the room capacity.  No tickets are required.

Cary Elwes

About Presenter Cary Elwes

 

Cary Elwes is a celebrated English actor who starred as “Westley” in The Princess Bride before moving on to roles in Robin Hood: Men in Tights, Glory, Days of Thunder, Twister, and Saw, among many other acclaimed performances. He will always be indebted to The Princess Bride, for changing his life and giving him a career that has spanned decades. He lives in Hollywood, California, with his family.

RECENT BOOK:

As You Wish


201 W. Mifflin Street
Madison, WI 53703

 

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