NOVEMBER 2-5, 2017

and year round

in partnership with the MADISON PUBLIC LIBRARY FOUNDATION

03

Nov

High School Friday 2017

Jason Reynolds Amy Rose Capetta

11/03/2017 - 9:00am

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

This is a great opportunity for high school students in Madison to experience a wide-range of book-related programming and see many of the exciting programs offered by Madison Public Library. A program-rich schedule is designed to engage students in the Wisconsin Common Core Standards within a dynamic learning environment. Through meaningful interaction with authors, poets, and peers, students will see themselves as active members of the Madison community. They will gain confidence, exposure, and insight while applying skills in reading, writing, language, speaking, and listening in the real world.  The focus of this year’s High School Friday is to highlight the diverse ways cultural programs encourage students to edify, educate, and explore.

 

Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis and will be limited to 200 students. Register by emailing Conor Moran at cmoran@mplfoundation.org.

 

Giving Voice: First Wave Performance

 

High School Friday 2017 -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/03/2017 - 9:00am</span>

03

Nov

Friends of the Madison Public Library Book Sale

Friends of Madison Public Library

11/03/2017 - 9:00am

Central Library

Find great bargains for your home library and support the library!  This sale features books, DVDs and other materials of all types.  Most items are $2 or less.  Hosted by the Friends of the Madison Public Library in conjunction with the Wisconsin Book Festival.  Sale runs November 2-5. Sale hours: Thursday, November 2, 9 am - 9 pm, Friday, November 3, 9 am - 9 pm, Saturday, November 4, 9 am - 9 pm; Sunday, November 5, 11 am - 2 pm.

Friends of the Madison Public Library Book Sale -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/03/2017 - 9:00am</span>

02

Nov

Friends of the Madison Public Library Book Sale

Friends of Madison Public Library

11/02/2017 - 9:00am

Central Library

Find great bargains for your home library and support the library!  This sale features books, DVDs and other materials of all types.  Most items are $2 or less.  Hosted by the Friends of the Madison Public Library in conjunction with the Wisconsin Book Festival.  Sale runs November 2-5. Sale hours: Thursday, November 2, 9 am - 9 pm, Friday, November 3, 9 am - 9 pm, Saturday, November 4, 9 am - 9 pm; Sunday, November 5, 11 am - 2 pm.

Friends of the Madison Public Library Book Sale -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/02/2017 - 9:00am</span>

02

Nov

America: The Cookbook

Gabrielle Langholtz Christine Muhlke Ari Weinzweig

11/02/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

The United Recipes of America: A Culinary Road Trip Through the 50 States. Learn how each state's history, culture, and traditions define what we eat.

 

Beyond meatloaf and mac’n’cheese — what’s the “real” American food? The answer might surprise you. Moderated by America: The Cookbook author Gabrielle Langholtz, the book’s regional contributors Christine Muhlke and Ari Weinzweig celebrate the culinary heritage of a nation, regional favorites, and melting-pot fusion. The panelists cover the nation's traditions, from persimmon pudding and pickled pike to fiddleheads and fatback, and introduce local ingredients you never knew existed, like conch, huckleberries, chicory, ackee, and sumac. Discover delicious, authentic American dishes and take a culinary road trip that will make you want to travel, eat, and discover our vast nation.

America: The Cookbook -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/02/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

03

Nov

King of Spies

Blaine Harden

11/03/2017 - 6:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

From the New York Times bestselling author of Escape from Camp 14, the shocking, gripping account of the most powerful American spy you’ve never heard of is essential to understanding the most intractable foreign policy conflict of our time. Blaine Harden will discuss this story and the situation in North Korea in conversation with David Maraniss.

 

In 1946, master sergeant Donald Nichols was repairing jeeps on the sleepy island of Guam when he caught the eye of recruiters from the army’s Counter Intelligence Corps. After just three months’ training, he was sent to Korea, then a backwater beneath the radar of MacArthur’s Pacific Command. Though he lacked the pedigree of most U.S. spies—Nichols was a 7th grade dropout—he quickly metamorphosed from army mechanic to black ops phenomenon. He insinuated himself into the affections of America’s chosen puppet in South Korea, President Syngman Rhee, and became a pivotal player in the Korean War, warning months in advance about the North Korean invasion, breaking enemy codes, and identifying most of the targets destroyed by American bombs in North Korea. 

 

King of Spies -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/03/2017 - 6:00pm</span>

31

Jan

Eternal Life

Dara Horn

01/31/2018 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms

Rachel has an unusual problem: she can’t die. Her recent troubles – widowhood, a failing business, an unemployed middle-aged son – are only the latest. She has already put up with scores of marriages and hundreds of children, over 2,000 years – ever since she made a spiritual bargain to save the life of her first son back in Roman-occupied Jerusalem. There’s only one person in the world who understands: a man she once loved passionately, who has been stalking her for centuries, convinced that they belong together forever. In 2018, as her children and grandchildren develop new technologies for immortality, Rachel knows she must enable her beloved offspring to live fully – without her, but with meaning – by finding a way for herself to die. Gripping, hilarious, and profoundly moving, Eternal Life celebrates the bonds between generations, the power of faith, the purpose of death, and the reasons for being alive. 

Eternal Life -  - <span class="date-display-single">01/31/2018 - 7:00pm</span>

04

Nov

The Mountain

Paul Yoon

11/04/2017 - 3:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Paul Yoon displays his subtle, ethereal, and strikingly observant style with six thematically linked stories in The Mountain. It’s a luminous collection set across several continents—from the Hudson Valley to the Russian Far East—and periods of time after World War II, populated with characters who are connected by traumatic pasts, newly vagrant lives, and quests for solace. Though singular, they are united by the struggle to reconcile their pasts in the wake of violence, big and small, spiritual and corporeal. A morphine-addicted nurse wanders through the decimated French countryside in search of purpose; a dissatisfied wife sporadically takes a train across Spain with a much younger man in the wake of a building explosion; a from Korea to Shanghai, where she aimlessly works in a camera sweat shop, trying to outrun the ghosts of her past.

 

The Mountain -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 3:00pm</span>

04

Nov

Writing Home Ground

Robin Chapman Catherine Jagoe Alison Townsend

11/04/2017 - 12:00pm

Central Library - Local History Room

Robin Chapman, Catherine Jagoe, and Alison Townsend discuss capturing a sense of place in their writing. Books that evoke a strong “sense of place”—a deep knowledge of, and affection for, a particular location—are popular in our increasingly transient twenty-first century culture. Many people today live and work far away from what they once considered home. What are some of the consequences that place—or dis-placement—can have on our lives? How are we affected by our ancestral homes, the landscapes where we make our homes, or the places we encounter that we identify deeply with? 

 

Writing Home Ground -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 12:00pm</span>

03

Nov

Lawyers Who Write

Susan Gloss E.M. Kokie Jay Ranney Carl Rasmussen Dean Strang

11/03/2017 - 4:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

Five Madison-area lawyers gather for a panel discussion on how they have found a successful second career as writers. Whether writing fiction, history, or biography, these lawyers have brought their research and evaluative skills to bear creating new works. 

Lawyers Who Write -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/03/2017 - 4:30pm</span>

04

Nov

Cataclysm

Zeynab Ali

11/04/2017 - 10:30am

Central Library - The Bubbler

Cataclysm has caused conflicts and desolation in the Horn of Africa, resulting in the establishment of terrorist groups, famine, and the collapse and division of governments. The war and hunger that contributed to the collapse of the Somalian government resulted in the persecution of minority groups in Somalia and led those groups of people to flee to Kenya, where the world’s oldest refugee camps would later be established.

 

This is the incredible story of a Kenyan-born teen who later learns about her true identity as a former Somali refugee. She explores her family’s history and learns about their survival in the horrific Somali civil war. As an activist, Zeynab addresses the struggles immigrant and refugee families encounter in the United States, hoping to spread awareness of immigration. In this book, she shares her experience of growing up in the United States and how her own life inspired her to become the decisive, optimistic young activist she is today.

Cataclysm -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 10:30am</span>

03

Nov

Stars Over Clear Lake

Loretta Ellsworth

11/03/2017 - 4:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Lorraine Kindred’s most cherished memories are of the Surf Ballroom, where the young lost themselves to the brassy sounds of big band swing, where boys spent their last nights before shipping off to war, and where Lorraine was swept away by a star-crossed romance.

 

Returning to the ballroom for the first time since the 1940s, Lorraine enters a dazzling world she thought long vanished. But as the sparkling past comes to life, so does the fateful encounter that forced her to choose between her heart and her duty—and she must face the secret she buried. Along the way, she’ll rediscover herself, her passion, and her resilience. This moving novel is inspired by a real-life ballroom and POW camp in Iowa.

Stars Over Clear Lake -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/03/2017 - 4:30pm</span>

04

Nov

Close Enough For The Angels

Paul Madonna

11/04/2017 - 7:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Join the Wisconsin Book Festival as Paul Madonna discusses his two new illustrated novels in conversation with Paul Buhle.

 

About Close Enough For The Angels: Emit Hopper was a one-hit wonder—twice. First as a rock and roller in the 80s, then as a literary darling in the 90s. Now it's twenty years later, and despite his desire to remain a simple laundromat owner, stardom has found him once again. As he’s drawn back into the limelight he meets Julia, a former celebrity chef with an enigmatic past. But when she disappears while hiking with two other women, Emit finds himself chasing down a mystery that promises to leave him forever changed. From the artist and author of All Over Coffee and Everything is its own reward, Paul Madonna uses his signature blend of drawing and storytelling to deliver a beautiful and entertaining novel filled with suspense, surprise, and humor. With over one hundred lush and haunting drawings, this full-length, character-driven story is a fresh and innovative reinvention of the illustrated novel.

 

Close Enough For The Angels -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 7:30pm</span>

27

Oct

Bringing It Home

Gail Simmons

10/27/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms

Bringing It Home is the cookbook that Top Chef fans have been waiting for. Gail Simmons is a beloved figure in the food world who has been a popular judge on Top Chef, the number-one rated food show on cable television. In Bringing It Home, Simmons shares her best recipes and food experiences.

 

In her travels, exploring global flavors and keeping detailed diaries, and her Top Chef culinary adventures with the world's most notable chefs, she is always asking: "How can I bring this dish home to my own kitchen?" Her goal is to make fabulous recipes using accessible ingredients and smart, simple cooking techniques for successful family meals and easy entertaining. From Bloody Mary Eggs to Christmas Brisket Fried Rice, Summer Vegetable Salad with Charred Lime Vinaigrette to Banana-Cardamom Upside Down Cake with Salty Caramel, there is a recipe for everyone in the family. Simmons also shares ingredient tips, cooking techniques, and many informative "Snippets," as well as personal and behind-the-scenes stories that will appeal to fans and food lovers everywhere.

 

Bringing It Home -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/27/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

05

Nov

The Driftless Reader

Curt Meine

11/05/2017 - 1:00pm

Central Library - Local History Room

Editor, Curt Meine, and a panel of contributors read from and discuss of The Driftless Reader.  Ancient glaciers passed by the Driftless Area and waterways vein its interior, forming an enchanting, enigmatic landscape of sharp ridgetops and deep valleys. Across time, this rugged topography has been home to an astonishing variety of people: Sauk, Dakota, and Ho-Chunk villagers, Norwegian farmers and Mexican mercado owners, Dominican nuns and Buddhist monks, river raftsmen and Shakespearean actors, Cornish miners and African American barn builders, organic entrepreneurs and Hmong truck gardeners.

 

The Driftless Reader -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/05/2017 - 1:00pm</span>

03

Nov

Policing the Black Man

Angela J. Davis

11/03/2017 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

A comprehensive analysis of the key issues of the Black Lives Matter movement, this thought-provoking and compelling anthology features essays by some of the nation’s most influential and respected criminal justice experts and legal scholars.

 

Policing the Black Man explores and critiques the many ways the criminal justice system impacts the lives of African American boys and men at every stage of the criminal process, from arrest through sentencing.  Essays range from an explication of the historical roots of racism in the criminal justice system to an examination of modern-day police killings of unarmed black men. The analysis discusses and explains racial profiling, the power and discretion of police and prosecutors, the role of implicit bias, the racial impact of police and prosecutorial decisions, the disproportionate imprisonment of black men, the collateral consequences of mass incarceration, and the Supreme Court’s failure to provide meaningful remedies for the injustices in the criminal justice system. Policing the Black Man is an enlightening must-read for anyone interested in the critical issues of race and justice in America.

Policing the Black Man -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/03/2017 - 7:30pm</span>

03

Nov

Homing Instincts

Sarah Menkedick

11/03/2017 - 4:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Sarah Menkedick spent her twenties trekking alone across South America, teaching English to recalcitrant teenagers on Reunion Island, picking grapes in France and camping on the Mongolian grasslands; for her, meaning and purpose were to be found on the road, in flight from the ordinary. Yet the biggest and most transformative adventure of her life might be one she never anticipated: at 31, she moves into a tiny 19th-century cabin on her family’s Ohio farm and begins the journey into motherhood.

Homing Instincts -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/03/2017 - 4:30pm</span>

04

Nov

Spy Schools

Daniel Golden

11/04/2017 - 4:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

Grounded in extensive research and reporting, Spy Schools reveals how academia has emerged as a frontline in the global spy game. In a knowledge-based economy, universities are repositories of valuable information and research, where brilliant minds of all nationalities mingle freely with few questions asked. Intelligence agencies have always recruited bright undergraduates, but now, in an era when espionage increasingly requires specialized scientific or technological expertise, they’re wooing higher-level academics—not just as analysts, but also for clandestine operations.

 

Spy Schools -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 4:30pm</span>

02

Nov

Death in Cold Water

Patricia Skalka

11/02/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

The Dave Cubiak Door County Mysteries pit a former troubled Chicago cop against a roster of clever killers on the Door County Peninsula in the heart of the Midwest. In the newest installation, a prominent philanthropist disappears on a bracing autumn day in Door County. Is the elderly Gerald Sneider—known as “Mr. Packer” for his legendary support of Green Bay football—suffering from dementia, or just avoiding his greedy son? Is there a connection to threats against the National Football League? As tourists flood the peninsula for the fall colors, Sheriff Dave Cubiak’s search for Sneider is stymied by the FBI. When human bones wash up on the Lake Michigan shore, the sheriff has more than a missing man to worry about. In order to respond to the media's demand for answers and solve the two puzzles on his plate, Cubiak must follow his instincts down a trail of half-remembered rumors and local history to discover the shocking truth.

Death in Cold Water -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/02/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

04

Nov

Crossings

Jon Kerstetter

11/04/2017 - 3:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

As a child living on an Indian reservation, Jon Kerstetter knew the meaning of boundaries. Driven by a desire to break free of society’s expectations, he pushed to graduate from college and earn advance degrees in business and, at the age of thirty-seven, medicine. Those were just the first among the many improbable and dramatic transitions Kerstetter has made in his life. In Crossings: A Doctor-Soldier’s Story, he writes beautifully and thoughtfully about his exceptional life of transformations. Kerstetter goes from civilian to doctor to soldier, trained to heal yet trained to kill, and then to stroke victim, and, eventually, to writer.

 

Crossings -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 3:00pm</span>

03

Nov

Unbranded

Ben Masters

11/03/2017 - 6:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

On an epic 3,000-mile journey through the most pristine backcountry of the American West, four friends rode horseback across an almost contiguous stretch of unspoiled public lands, border to border, from Mexico to Canada. For their trail horses, they adopted wild mustangs from the US Bureau of Land Management that were perfectly adapted to the rocky terrain and harsh conditions of desert and mountain travel.

 

A meticulously planned but sometimes unpredictable route brought them face to face with unrelenting heat, raging rivers, sheer cliffs, sickness, injury, and death. But they also experienced a special camaraderie with each other and with the mustangs. Through it all, they had a constant traveling companion—a cameraman, shooting for the documentary film Unbranded. The trip’s inspiration and architect, Ben Masters, is joined here by the three other riders, Ben Thamer, Thomas Glover, and Jonny Fitzsimons; two memorable teachers and horse trainers; and the film’s producers and intrepid cameramen in the telling of this improbable story of adventure and self-discovery.

Unbranded -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/03/2017 - 6:00pm</span>

02

Nov

The Dark Net

Benjamin Percy

11/02/2017 - 5:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

The Dark Net is real. An anonymous and often criminal arena that exists in the secret far reaches of the web, some use it to manage Bitcoins, pirate movies and music, or traffic in drugs and stolen goods. And in Percy's novel, an ancient darkness is gathering there as well. These demons are threatening to spread virally into the real world unless they can be stopped by members of a ragtag crew: twelve-year-old Hannah, who has been fitted with the Mirage—a high-tech visual prosthetic to combat her blindness—wonders why she sees shadows surrounding some people; Lela, a technophobic journalist, has stumbled upon a story nobody wants her to uncover; Mike Juniper, a one-time child evangelist who suffers from personal and literal demons, has an arsenal of weapons stored in the basement of the homeless shelter he runs; and Derek, a hacker with a cause, believes himself a soldier of the internet, part of a cyber army akin to Anonymous.

 

They have no idea what the Dark Net really contains.

The Dark Net -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/02/2017 - 5:30pm</span>

04

Nov

The Mirror Thief

Martin Seay

11/04/2017 - 1:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

In March of 2003, the days leading up to the invasion of Iraq, a recently-retired U.S. Marine travels to Las Vegas to track down an infamous professional gambler who’s gone missing under suspicious circumstances. In February of 1958, a Brooklyn-born juvenile delinquent arrives in coastal Los Angeles—a hotbed of the nascent Beat scene—to search for an obscure poet with whom he’s become obsessed. In May of 1592, a war-hero physician and alchemist navigates the intrigues of Venetian society as he conspires to steal the secrets of making flat glass mirrors on behalf of a shadowy foreign power. In his debut novel, Martin Seay weaves these strands into a unique literary thriller: an entertaining, puzzling, ultimately moving novel about the ways we are haunted by our own reflections.

The Mirror Thief -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 1:30pm</span>

05

Nov

A Year in the Wilderness

Amy and Dave Freeman

11/05/2017 - 10:30am

Central Library - Community Room 302

From adventurers and educators Amy and Dave Freeman, a passionate and beautifully illustrated account of a year in the Boundary Waters. The Boundary Waters—with over twelve hundred miles of canoe routes—is one of our national treasures, yet their existence has been consistently threatened. When the Freemans learned of copper nickel mining in the area’s watershed, they decided to take action. They would speak on behalf of the Boundary Waters. And they would do it by spending a year in the wilderness.

 

A Year in the Wilderness -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/05/2017 - 10:30am</span>

04

Nov

Janesville: An American Story

Amy Goldstein

11/04/2017 - 6:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

Two days before Christmas of 2008, General Motors’ oldest operating assembly plant, in Paul Ryan’s hometown of Janesville, Wisconsin, shut down in the midst of the Great Recession. After thousands of jobs vanished from this small, proud city, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Amy Goldstein spent years immersed in Janesville to illuminate the human consequences of one of the nation’s biggest political issues. Janesville: An American Story is an intimate account, taking readers deep into the lives of autoworkers, educators, bankers, politicians and job re-trainers to show why it’s so hard in the twenty-first century to recreate a prosperous, healthy working class.

 

Presented in partnership with the Wisconsin Humanities Council as part of its Working Lives Project, which asks Wisconsinites “What does work mean in your life?”  Click here to talk shop and learn more!

Janesville: An American Story -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 6:00pm</span>

04

Nov

One Day We'll All Be Dead And None Of This Will Matter

Scaachi Koul

11/04/2017 - 9:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

In One Day We’ll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter, Scaachi Koul deploys her razor-sharp humor to share all the fears, outrages, and mortifying moments of her life. She learned from an early age what made her miserable, and for Scaachi anything can be cause for despair. Whether it’s a shopping trip gone awry; enduring awkward conversations with her bikini waxer; overcoming her fear of flying while vacationing halfway around the world; dealing with Internet trolls, or navigating the fears and anxieties of her parents. Alongside these personal stories are pointed observations about life as a woman of color: where every aspect of her appearance is open for critique, derision, or outright scorn; where strict gender rules bind in both Western and Indian cultures, leaving little room for a woman not solely focused on marriage and children to have a career (and a life) for herself.

 

With a sharp eye and biting wit, incomparable rising star and cultural observer Scaachi Koul offers a hilarious, scathing, and honest look at modern life.

 

One Day We'll All Be Dead And None Of This Will Matter -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 9:00pm</span>

07

Nov

I & You

Lauren Gunderson

11/07/2017 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room

Lauren Gunderson is currently America's most-produced living playwright.  Her play Silent Sky captivated local audiences when it was produced by Forward Theater Company in 2015.  Forward is bringing Lauren back to Madison in conjunction with their November 2017 production of her prize-winning play I & You.  In this free public talk, Lauren will discuss her playwriting process and career, and her experiences as a woman writer in America.  

 

Presented in partnership between Forward Theater, the UW Arts Institute, and the UW-Madison University Lectures Committee.

I & You -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/07/2017 - 7:30pm</span>

05

Nov

Don't Call Us Dead

Danez Smith

11/05/2017 - 1:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Danez Smith is a groundbreaking force, celebrated for deft lyrics, urgent subjects, and performative power. Don’t Call Us Dead opens with a heartrending sequence that imagines an afterlife for black men shot by police, a place where suspicion, violence, and grief are forgotten and replaced with the safety, love, and longevity they deserved here on earth. Smith turns then to desire, mortality—the dangers experienced in skin, body, and blood—and a diagnosis of HIV positive. “some of us are killed / in pieces,” Smith writes, “some of us all at once.” Don’t Call Us Dead is an astonishing collection, one that confronts America where every day is too often a funeral and not often enough a miracle.  

Don't Call Us Dead -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/05/2017 - 1:30pm</span>

04

Nov

Look Up! and The Magic Rabbit

Annette LeBlanc Cate

11/04/2017 - 10:30am

Central Library - The Children's Section

Presented in partnership with the Wisconsin Historical Museum's Story Saturday, Annette LeBlanc Cate reads from her two celebrated children's books, Look Up! and The Magic Rabbit.

 

About Look Up!: This conversational, humorous introduction to bird-watching encourages kids to get outdoors with a sketchbook and really look around. Quirky full-color illustrations portray dozens of birds chatting about their distinctive characteristics, including color, shape, plumage, and beak and foot types, while tongue-in-cheek cartoons feature banter between birds, characters, and the reader ("Here I am, the noble spruce grouse. In a spruce grove. Eatin’ some spruce. Yep."). Interactive and enjoyable tips bring an age-old hobby to new life for the next generation of bird-watchers.

 

Look Up! and The Magic Rabbit -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 10:30am</span>

02

Nov

It Devours!

Jeffrey Cranor Joseph Fink

11/02/2017 - 8:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

From the authors of Welcome to Night Vale and the creators of the podcast of the same name, comes a noir-esque mystery exploring faith and science.

 

Nilanjana Sikdar is an outsider to the town of Night Vale. Working for Carlos, the town’s top scientist, she relies on fact and logic as her guiding principles. But all of that is put into question when Carlos gives her a special assignment investigating a mysterious rumbling in the desert wasteland outside of town. This investigation leads her to the Joyous Congregation of the Smiling God, and to Darryl, one of its most committed members. Caught between her beliefs in the ultimate power of science and her growing attraction to Darryl, she begins to suspect the Congregation is planning a ritual that could threaten the lives of everyone in town. Nilanjana and Darryl must search for common ground between their very different world views as they are faced with the Congregation’s darkest and most terrible secret.

 

It Devours! -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/02/2017 - 8:30pm</span>

03

Nov

Away With Words

Joe Berkowitz

11/03/2017 - 9:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

In a world where the corny is commended and the punniest reigns supreme, one writer must conquer his fears in order to compete with the greats in the ultimate battle of wit and wordplay. Away with Words: An Irreverent Tour Through the World of Pun Competitions finds entertainment writer Joe Berkowitz narrating his journey into the heart of the competitive punning world, introducing us to a quirky crew of contestants and the riotous tournaments that regularly celebrate the art of the pun. A delightful and witty narrative, Away With Words will elicit laugh after laugh—and, yes, the occasional bad-pun-induced groan—as Joe relates his firsthand experiences with competitive punning and all of the people, the places, and the defiant passion that fuel this thriving comedy scene.

 

Away With Words -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/03/2017 - 9:00pm</span>

04

Nov

Hidden Voices

Fabu Sherry Lucille Catrina Sparkman

11/04/2017 - 3:00pm

Central Library - Local History Room

Three Madison-area African American writers, poet Fabu, novelist Sherry Lucille, and playwright and novelist Catrina Sparkman, discuss their poetry and prose in relation to the work of three African American literary giants who also lived and worked in the Madison area during the 20th century: novelist Jean Toomer, playwright Lorraine Hansberry, and poet Sarah Webster Fabio. Experience poetry, prose, and drama that sheds light on what it means to be African American in Wisconsin today, yesterday, and tomorrow through a multimedia presentation about the work and lives of these literary artists and their interpretations of race in Wisconsin. Learn more and find other program dates at Beyond the Page.

Hidden Voices -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 3:00pm</span>

02

Nov

The Impossible Presidency

Jeremi Suri

11/02/2017 - 5:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

Why have recent presidents failed to bring promised change?

 

In The Impossible Presidency, celebrated historian Jeremi Suri charts the rise and fall of the American presidency, from the limited role envisaged by the Founding Fathers to its current status as the most powerful job in the world. He argues that the presidency is a victim of its own success, such that the vastness of the job makes it almost impossible to fulfill the expectations placed upon it. As managers of the world's largest economy and military, contemporary presidents must react to a truly globalized world in a twenty-four-hour news cycle. There is little room left for bold vision.

 

Suri traces America's disenchantment with our recent presidents to the inevitable mismatch between presidential promises and the structural limitations of the office. A masterful reassessment of presidential history, this book is essential reading for anyone trying to understand America's fraught political climate.

 

Presented in partnership with The Madison Institute.

The Impossible Presidency -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/02/2017 - 5:30pm</span>

04

Nov

Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk

Kathleen Rooney

11/04/2017 - 12:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

She took 1930s New York by storm, working her way up writing copy for R.H. Macy’s to become the highest paid advertising woman in the country. It was a job that, she says, “in some ways saved my life, and in other ways ruined it.” Now it’s the last night of 1984 and Lillian, 85 years old but just as sharp and savvy as ever, is on her way to a party. It’s chilly enough out for her mink coat and Manhattan is grittier now—her son keeps warning her about a subway vigilante on the prowl—but the quick-tongued poetess has never been one to scare easily.

 

Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 12:00pm</span>

04

Nov

The Odyssey of Echo Company

Doug Stanton

11/04/2017 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

The Odyssey of Echo Company: The 1968 Tet Offensive and the Epic Battle of Echo Company to Survive the Vietnam War is the untold and remarkable story of one small platoon of American soldiers and their heroic sixty-day fight for survival during the height of the Vietnam War. Doug Stanton will discuss this story in conversation with David Maraniss.

 

The Odyssey of Echo Company -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 7:30pm</span>

05

Nov

Preservation

Christina Ward

11/05/2017 - 10:30am

Central Library - The Bubbler

More than a cookbook, Preservation: The Art and Science of Canning, Fermentation and Dehydration demystifies the scientific concepts that inform the methods of food preservation in an easy to understand way. Taking Julia Child as her inspiration, certified Master Food Preserver Christina Ward has collected and translated both the scientific and experiential information that has long been the sole domain of academic scientists and elite chefs.

 

Fueled by her mission to correct online misinformation and scientifically outdated materials, Ward guides readers through a comprehensive survey of the methods that will ensure your preservation projects are safe and delicious. Included are highly adaptable recipes that demonstrate every method and technique of preservation.

Preservation -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/05/2017 - 10:30am</span>

05

Nov

Faces of a Fish Empire

Joe Kutchera

11/05/2017 - 12:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

In April of 2016, photographer and curator Naomi Shersty attended the funeral of Tom Kutchera, former owner of Empire Fish Company and amateur photographer. She discovered two albums of portraits by Tom, taken between the 1960s and ‘80s, that captured Empire Fish’s workers who supplied fish to Milwaukee’s many fish fries and restaurants. That discovery led her to turn these portraits of a “work family” into a photo exhibit. And now, Tom’s sons, Joe and Andrew, have turned the exhibit, photos, and a manuscript that Tom left behind into a book – Faces of a Fish Empire – that tell the story behind their father’s portraits as well as the decline of commercial fishing on Lake Michigan.

 

This visual history of Empire Fish and commercial fishing exhibit tell a larger story beyond a single company. It captures the anthropological changes of Milwaukee: its culture, food, religion, and demographics. On a larger scale, it embodies the incredible changes in technology (freezers, transportation, and computers) and the transformation in our relationship to Lake Michigan and the Great Lakes.

Faces of a Fish Empire -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/05/2017 - 12:00pm</span>

05

Nov

100 Things To Do In Madison Before You Die

Katie Vaughn

11/05/2017 - 10:30am

Central Library - Community Room 301

Wondering what to do this winter? Let 100 Things to Do in Madison Before You Die be your guide in making the most of the season. From sledding, hiking and eagle-viewing, to incredible museums, shops and shows, to hearty food and good brews, your local entertainment options seem to heat up when temperatures start to plummet. Load up on inspiration straight from the book, and then create your own winter bucket list that’ll keep the fun going straight till spring.

100 Things To Do In Madison Before You Die -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/05/2017 - 10:30am</span>

17

Nov

The House of Unexpected Sisters

Alexander McCall Smith

11/17/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

Precious Ramotswe learns valuable lessons about first impressions and forgiveness in this latest installment of the No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency series.

 

The House of Unexpected Sisters -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/17/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

05

Oct

Forest Dark

Nicole Krauss

10/05/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms

The award-winning, New York Times bestselling author of The History of Love conjures an achingly beautiful and breathtakingly original novel about personal transformation that interweaves the stories of two disparate individuals—an older lawyer and a young novelist—whose transcendental search leads them to the same Israeli desert.

 

Forest Dark -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/05/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

04

Nov

There Your Heart Lies

Mary Gordon

11/04/2017 - 6:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

From the novelist Mary Gordon, here is a book whose twentieth-century wisdom can help us understand the difficulties we face in the twenty-first: There Your Heart Lies is a deeply moving novel about an American woman's experiences during the Spanish Civil War, the lessons she learned, and how her story will shape her granddaughter's path.

 

There Your Heart Lies -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 6:00pm</span>

04

Nov

Not A Scientist

Dave Levitan

11/04/2017 - 1:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 02

You can be sure of one thing in politics: politicians always have scientific facts on hand—sometimes with their fingers crossed. No matter the complexities of climate change, infectious diseases, pollution, or vaccines—it’s easy to justify almost any position with the help of infallible scientific experts. The recent election season was no exception: every candidate claimed deep expertise on specialized subjects from fisheries to fracking. Trouble is, as journalist Dave Levitan demonstrates in his book Not a Scientist: How Politicians Mistake, Misrepresent, and Utterly Mangle Science, there are many ways to misread the data—and our friends in Washington turn out to be very creative readers indeed. It was Ronald Reagan, the Great Communicator himself, who made famous the disingenuous humblebrag “I’m not a scientist, but…” And thus, a rhetorical monster was born.

 

Not A Scientist -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 1:30pm</span>

03

Nov

The Far Away Brothers

Lauren Markham

11/03/2017 - 6:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Lauren Markham has been reporting on undocumented immigration for a nearly a decade, but it was not as a journalist that she first met seventeen-year-old Ernesto and Raul Flores, who had recently emigrated from El Salvador alone. She was working at Oakland International High School, a school for recent immigrants where she coordinates programs for families, when the Flores twins walked into her office, scared stiff, having just missed their date in immigration court. That meeting grew into the illuminating and harrowing story she tells in The Far Away Brothers: Two Young Migrants and the Making of an American Life.

 

The Far Away Brothers -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/03/2017 - 6:00pm</span>

05

Nov

A House Among the Trees

Julia Glass

11/05/2017 - 1:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

A House Among the Trees is a richly plotted novel of friendship and love, artistic ambition, the perils of celebrity, and the power of an unexpected legacy. When the revered children’s book author Mort Lear dies accidentally at his Connecticut home, he leaves his property and all its contents to his trusted assistant, Tomasina Daulair, who is moved by his generosity but dismayed by the complicated and defiant directives in his will. Tommy knew Morty for more than four decades, since meeting him in a Manhattan playground when she was twelve and he was working on sketches for the book that would make him a star. By the end of his increasingly reclusive life, she found herself living in his house as confidante and helpmeet, witness not just to his daily routines but to the emotional fallout of his strange boyhood and his volatile relationship with a lover who died of AIDS.

 

A House Among the Trees -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/05/2017 - 1:30pm</span>

05

Nov

Montaigne in Barn Boots

Michael Perry

11/05/2017 - 12:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Michael Perry discovered the great French essayist Michel de Montaigne courtesy of a kidney stone. After passing “the Devil’s own gobstopper,” Perry began researching renal calculi and discovered that Montaigne—the 16th century inventor of the essay form—had documented his own kidney stone experience. From this oddball introduction, Perry plunged headlong into the works of Montaigne. The raw, vulnerable, and hilarious result is Montaigne in Barn Boots: An Amateur Ambles through Philosophy.

 

Montaigne in Barn Boots -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/05/2017 - 12:00pm</span>

04

Nov

The Inheritance

Niki Kapsambelis

11/04/2017 - 12:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

Every sixty-nine seconds, someone is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. It is the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States and the only cause of death in the top 10 without a way to prevent, cure, or even slow its progression. Today an estimated 24 to 36 million people worldwide suffer from Alzheimer’s, 5.3 million in the United States alone.  These numbers continue to swell with the “silver tsunami,” a generation of baby boomers whose health demands could wreak devastation on an already burdened system. If science doesn’t find a way to stop or prevent this global health crisis unfolding before our eyes, the population affected by this disease will triple by 2050, with a cost to Americans of $20 trillion in today’s dollars.  

 

The Inheritance -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 12:00pm</span>

16

Oct

How the Right Lost Its Mind

Charles Sykes

10/16/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

Charlie Sykes describes himself as a “contrarian conservative.” After the seismic events of 2016, Sykes is on the outside, politically, wondering what has happened to the Republican party. In How the Right Lost Its Mind he examines how conservatives have strayed so far from their core values and what it will take to recover. It’s also a deeply personal reckoning with Sykes’s own role in his party’s implosion. Sykes has written searing pieces for The New York Times and Politico, among others, on the state of conservatism, propelling him to the forefront of a national debate on political values.

 

How the Right Lost Its Mind -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/16/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

04

Nov

The Hearts of Men

Nickolas Butler

11/04/2017 - 4:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

The Hearts of Men is an evocative, decades-spanning look at intertwining friendships and families that explores the slippery definitions of fidelity, morality, and trust—all played out against a backdrop of a venerable Boy Scout camp in the Wisconsin woods. It begins at Camp Chippewa in 1962. Thirteen-year-old Nelson Doughty, the camp bugler, is at once an overachiever and social outcast. This summer, however, launches a tenuous friendship with a popular boy named Jonathan. Years later, Nelson—irrevocably scarred from the Vietnam War—has become Scoutmaster of Camp Chippewa. Jonathan, meanwhile, has married, divorced, and taken over his father’s highly successful trucking business. When something unthinkable involving Jonathan’s teenage grandson and daughter-in- law happens at the camp, its aftermath test the depths—and the limits—of Nelson's selflessness and bravery. The Hearts of Men is Butler’s astute exploration of what it means to be a good person and whether we have to be intrinsically good or if it’s possible to get there by trying, failing, and trying again.

The Hearts of Men -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 4:30pm</span>

04

Nov

Nomadland

Jessica Bruder

11/04/2017 - 10:30am

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

From the beet fields of North Dakota to the National Forest campgrounds of California to Amazon's CamperForce program in Texas, employers have discovered a new, low-cost labor pool, made up largely of transient older Americans. Finding that social security comes up short, often underwater on mortgages, these invisible casualties of the Great Recession have taken to the road by the tens of thousands in late-model RVs, travel trailers, and vans, forming a growing community of nomads: migrant laborers who call themselves "workampers." On frequently traveled routes between seasonal jobs, Jessica Bruder meets people from all walks of life: a former professor, a McDonald's vice president, a minister, a college administrator, and a motorcycle cop, among many others--including her irrepressible protagonist, a onetime cocktail waitress, Home Depot clerk, and general contractor named Linda May.

 

Nomadland -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 10:30am</span>

10

Aug

Sachiko: a Nagasaki Bomb Survivor's Story

Caren Stelson

08/10/2017 - 10:00am

Central Library - Room 302

This striking work of narrative nonfiction tells the true story of six-year-old Sachiko Yasui’s survival of the Nagasaki atomic bomb on August 9, 1945, and the heartbreaking and lifelong aftermath. Having conducted extensive interviews with Sachiko Yasui, Caren Stelson chronicles Sachiko’s long journey toward peace. This special book offers readers a remarkable new perspective on the final moments of World War II, the fifty years that followed, and the courage it took for one woman to tell her story of nuclear war and peace.

 

Stelson will give a talk about the complicated history surrounding the end of WWII, and her process of meeting with Sachiko to document her life 60 years later. She will also appear at Lanterns for Peace, Wednesday August 9th atTenney Park, 6:00 p.m.

 

Sachiko: a Nagasaki Bomb Survivor's Story -  - <span class="date-display-single">08/10/2017 - 10:00am</span>

20

Jul

Besieged

Kevin Hearne Patrick Rothfuss

07/20/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Madison Room

The ancient gods are alive and well in the modern world in this hilarious, action-packed collection of original short stories featuring Atticus O’Sullivan, the handsome, tattooed, two-thousand-year-old Irishman with extraordinary magic powers from Kevin Hearne’s Iron Druid Chronicles. 

 

Besieged -  - <span class="date-display-single">07/20/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

09

Oct

Dinner at the Center of the Earth

Nathan Englander

10/09/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Presented in partnership with the UW-Madison Center for the Humanities, Nathan Englander reads from his new novel, Dinner At The Center Of The Earth. From the Pulitzer finalist and best-selling author of For the Relief of Unbearable Urges--a political thriller that unfolds in the highly charged territory of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and pivots on the complex relationship between a secret prisoner and his guard.

 

Dinner at the Center of the Earth -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/09/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

14

Jun

Illusion of Justice

Jerome Buting

06/14/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Presented in partnership with Mystery to Me Bookstore, Jerome Buting discusses his new book, Illusion of Justice: Inside Making a Murderer and America's Broken Justice System. Over his career, Jerome F. Buting has spent hundreds of hours in courtrooms representing defendants in criminal trials. When he agreed to join Dean Strang as co-counsel for the defense in Steven A. Avery vs. State of Wisconsin, he knew a hard fight lay ahead. But, as he reveals in Illusion of Justice, no-one could have predicted just how tough and twisted that fight would be—or that it would become the center of the Netflix documentary sensation Making a Murderer, which made Steven Avery and his nephew, Brendan Dassey, household names and thrust America’s criminal justice system into the spotlight. 

 

Illusion of Justice -  - <span class="date-display-single">06/14/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

07

May

Listen to Your Grandmothers

05/07/2017 - 1:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

Join the Wisconsin Book Festival at a gala for the book Listen to Your Grandmothers:  Madison Wisconsin's Raging Grannies Sing for Peace, Social Justice, Public Education, and Environmental Protection. The event will feature the Raging Grannies, directed by Deborah Lofgren, singing some of their original songs, a video of the Raging Grannies recording their CD, a presentation by Raging Granny, Bev Mazur, of Granny portraits and other group pictures. Friends, relatives, and aficionados of the Raging Grannies and political activism are invited to attend.  Refreshments will be served.

 

About Listen to Your Grandmothers:

Listen to Your Grandmothers -  - <span class="date-display-single">05/07/2017 - 1:00pm</span>

07

Jul

The Hour of Land

Terry Tempest Williams

07/07/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

America’s national parks are breathing spaces in a world in which such spaces are steadily disappearing, which is why more than 300 million people visit the parks each year. Now Terry Tempest Williams, the author of the environmental classic Refuge and the beloved memoir When Women Were Birds, returns with The Hour of Land, a literary celebration of our national parks and an exploration of what they mean to us and what we mean to them.

 

From the Grand Tetons in Wyoming to Acadia in Maine to Big Bend in Texas, Williams creates a series of lyrical portraits that illuminate the unique grandeur of each place while delving into what it means to shape a landscape with its own evolutionary history into something of our own making. Part memoir, part natural history, and part social critique, The Hour of Land is a meditation and a manifesto on why wild lands matter to the soul of America.

 

The Hour of Land -  - <span class="date-display-single">07/07/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

28

Apr

What Do We Do Now?: America in the Age of Trump

Kevin Powell

04/28/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

THIS EVENT WAS CANCELED ON APRIL 26 DUE TO PRESENTER ILLNESS. INFORMATION WILL BE ADDED TO THE WEB SITE IF THIS EVENT CAN BE RESCHEDULED.

 

Join Kevin Powell for a community conversation about state of the America seen through the lens of his experiences traveling the country and engaging with people.

 

About The Education of Kevin Powell: A Boy’s Journey into Manhood:

 

What Do We Do Now?: America in the Age of Trump -  - <span class="date-display-single">04/28/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

03

Jun

Testimony

Scott Turow

06/03/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

Bill ten Boom has walked out on everything he thought was important to him: his career, his wife, Kindle County, even his country. Still, when he is tapped to examine the disappearance of an entire Gypsy refugee camp – unsolved for ten years – he feels drawn to what will become the most elusive case of his career. In order to uncover what happened during the apocalyptic chaos after the Bosnian War, Boom must navigate a host of suspects ranging from Serb paramilitaries to organized crime gangs to the U.S. government, while also maneuvering among the alliances and treacheries of those connected to the case: Morgan Merriwell, a disgraced U.S. Major General; Ferko Rincic, the massacre's sole survivor; and Esma Czarni an alluring barrister with secrets to protect. As the story stretches across continents, Bill ten Boom finds himself based in a new country, far from home, starting over. As questions of responsibility, patriotism, and possible corruption within the U.S. Military converge, Boom’s once quiet life is upended in both alarming and exciting ways. 

 

Testimony -  - <span class="date-display-single">06/03/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

13

Apr

Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing Fellows Reading

04/13/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Presented in partnership with the Program in Creative Writing, poetry and fiction from the 2016-17 Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing Fellows.  This event will feature the work of Derrick Austin, Jamel Brinkley, Natalie Eilbert, Sarah Fuchs, Marcela Fuentes, and Barrett Swanson.

Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing Fellows Reading -  - <span class="date-display-single">04/13/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

03

Apr

UW Poetry MFA Graduates Reading

04/03/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Presented in partnership with the Program in Creative Writing, a reading from the MFA cohort in poetry.  This event will feature the work of graduating poets: Alisha Dietzman, Sean Patrick Mulroy, Thiahera Nurse, Carolyn Orosz, and Leslie Sainz.

UW Poetry MFA Graduates Reading -  - <span class="date-display-single">04/03/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

18

Apr

Everybody's Fool

Richard Russo

04/18/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

Everybody’s Fool picks up roughly a decade since we were last with Miss Beryl and Sully on New Year's Eve 1984. The irresistible Sully, who in the intervening years has come by some unexpected good fortune, is staring down a VA cardiologist’s estimate that he has only a year or two left, and it’s hard work trying to keep this news from the most important people in his life: Ruth, the married woman he carried on with for years . . . the ultra-hapless Rub Squeers, who worries that he and Sully aren’t still best friends . . . Sully’s son and grandson, for whom he was mostly an absentee figure (and now a regretful one). We also enjoy the company of Doug Raymer, the chief of police who’s obsessing primarily over the identity of the man his wife might’ve been about to run off with, before dying in a freak accident . . . Bath’s mayor, the former academic Gus Moynihan, whose wife problems are, if anything, even more pressing . . . and then there’s Carl Roebuck, whose lifelong run of failing upward might now come to ruin.

Everybody's Fool -  - <span class="date-display-single">04/18/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

08

Apr

The Collapsing Empire

John Scalzi

04/08/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

One of the most popular and acclaimed science fiction authors to emerge in the last decade, New York Times bestselling author John Scalzi returns with the beginning of an exciting new saga: ​The Collapsing Empire. Entertaining, hilarious, and creative both in his books and his online musings, Scalzi continues to cement his well-deserved prominent place in the literary world. Our universe is ruled by physics and faster than light travel is not possible—until the discovery of The Flow, an extra-dimensional field  we can access at certain points in space-time that transport us to other  worlds, around other stars. Humanity flows away from Earth, into space, and in time forgets our home world and creates a new empire, the Interdependency, whose ethos requires that no one human outpost can survive without the others. It’s a hedge against interstellar war—and a system of control for the rulers of the empire. The Flow is eternal—but it is not static. Just as a river changes course, The Flow changes as well, cutting off worlds from the rest of humanity.

The Collapsing Empire -  - <span class="date-display-single">04/08/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

02

Mar

Night At The Fiestas

Kirstin Valdez Quade

03/02/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Presented in partneship with the Program in Creative Writing at the UW-Madison, the Wisconsin Book Festival welcomes Kristin Valdez Quade. With intensity and emotional precision, Kirstin Valdez Quade's unforgettable stories plunge us into the fierce, troubled hearts of characters defined by the desire to escape the past or else to plumb its depths. The deadbeat father of a pregnant teenager tries to transform his life by playing the role of Jesus in a bloody penitential Passion. A young man discovers that his estranged father and a boa constrictor have been squatting in his grandmother’s empty house. A lonely retiree new to Santa Fe becomes obsessed with her housekeeper. One girl attempts to uncover the mystery of her cousin's violent past, while another young woman finds herself at an impasse when she is asked to hear her priest's confession.

 

Always hopeful, these stories chart the passions and obligations of family life, exploring themes of race, class, and coming-of-age, as Quade's characters protect, betray, wound, undermine, bolster, define, and, ultimately, save each other.

Night At The Fiestas -  - <span class="date-display-single">03/02/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

13

Feb

Spiral Staircase

Sho Sugita

02/13/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

In partnership with The Bubbler and Oscar Presents, the Wisconsin Book Festival welcomes Sho Sugita for his translation of Hirato Renkichi's Spiral Staircase.  Renkichi produced a unique brand of Futurism from the late 1910s and early 1920s through poetry, criticism, and guerrilla performance. Contributing to the earliest productions of Japanese avant-garde poetry, his aggressive experimentation with speed, spatialization, and performability would later influence what became a lively community of Dadaist and Surrealist writers in pre-war Japan. Spiral Staircase is the first definitive volume of Renkichi’s poems to appear in English.

 

Spiral Staircase -  - <span class="date-display-single">02/13/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

18

May

Chuck Klosterman X

Chuck Klosterman

05/18/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

Chuck Klosterman X collects Chuck's most intriguing pieces along with fresh introductions and new footnotes throughout. Klosterman presents many of the articles in their original form, featuring previously unpublished structures, passages, and digressions. Subjects include Breaking Bad, Lou Reed, zombies, KISS, Jimmy Page, Stephen Malkmus, steroids, Mountain Dew, Chinese Democracy, The Beatles, Jonathan Franzen, Taylor Swift, Tim Tebow, Kobe Bryant, Usain Bolt, Eddie Van Halen, Charlie Brown, the Cleveland Browns, and many more cultural figures and pop phenomena. This is a tour of the past decade from one of the sharpest and most prolific observers of our unusual times.

 

The line can begin forming on the third floor at 6:00 PM.  Doors will open at 6:45 PM.  The event is free and open to the public.

Chuck Klosterman X -  - <span class="date-display-single">05/18/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

04

May

Imagine Wanting Only This

Kristen Radtke Jamel Brinkley

05/04/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

 

When Kristen Radtke was in college, the sudden death of a beloved uncle and, not long after his funeral, the sight of an abandoned mining town marked the beginning moments of a lifelong fascination with ruins and with people and places left behind. Over time, this fascination deepened until it triggered a journey around the world in search of ruined places. Now, in this genre-smashing graphic memoir, she leads us through deserted towns in the American Midwest, Italian villas, islands in the Philippines, New York City, and the delicate passageways of the human heart. At once narrative and factual, historical and personal, Radtke's stunning illustrations and piercing text never shy away from the big questions: Why are we here, and what will we leave behind?

Kristen Radtke will appear in conversation with Jamel Brinkely.

Imagine Wanting Only This -  - <span class="date-display-single">05/04/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

08

Mar

The Evolution of Ivanpah Solar

Jamey Stillings

03/08/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

In this new monograph, Jamey Stillings synthesizes environmental interests with his longstanding fascination with the intersections of nature and human activity. In October 2010, Stillings began a three-and-a-half-year aerial exploration over what has become the world's largest concentrated solar power plant, the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in the Mojave Desert of California. From the simple and stark terrain of the preconstruction landscape to the angular forms of the completed solar plant producing 392 megawatts of electricity on 14 square kilometers of public land, Stillings explores dynamic interactions between raw organic forms of nature and those defined by the project's precise geometric lines. Shot from a helicopter during first and last light, Stillings' black-and-white images intrigue with tight abstractions, oblique views of geologic and geometric forms, and broad open views of the dramatic desert basin.

The Evolution of Ivanpah Solar -  - <span class="date-display-single">03/08/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

09

Mar

Harmless Like You

Rowan Hisayo Buchanan

03/09/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Written in startlingly beautiful prose, Harmless Like You is set across New York, Connecticut, and Berlin, following Yuki Oyama, a Japanese girl fighting to make it as an artist, and Yuki’s son Jay who, as an adult in the present day, is forced to confront his mother’s abandonment of him when he was only two years old.

 

The novel opens when Yuki is sixteen and her father is posted back to Japan. Though she and her family have been living as outsiders in New York City, Yuki opts to stay, intoxicated by her friendship with the beautiful aspiring model Odile, the energy of the city, and her desire to become an artist. But when she becomes involved with an older man and the relationship turns destructive, Yuki’s life is unmoored. Harmless Like You is a suspenseful novel about the complexities of identity, art, adolescent friendships, and familial bonds that asks—and ultimately answers—how does a mother desert her son?

Harmless Like You -  - <span class="date-display-single">03/09/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

16

Feb

Learning to Stay

Erin Celello James Devita

02/16/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

How do you turn a novel into a theatrical play? Join us at the Madison Public Library for a conversation between author Erin Celello and playwright James DeVita as they discuss the process of adapting Celello’s novel, Learning to Stay, for the stage. Forward Theater Company presents the world premiere of Learning to Stay at Overture Center for the Arts, March 23rd through April 9th. Forward Artistic Director Jennifer Uphoff Gray will facilitate the discussion. For more information about the Forward Theater production, visit http://forwardtheater.com/show/learningtostay

Learning to Stay -  - <span class="date-display-single">02/16/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

14

Apr

Known and Strange Things

Teju Cole

04/14/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301-302

Presented in partnership with the UW Department of African Cultural Studies, Teju Cole's newest collection of essays. With this collection of more than fifty pieces on politics, photography, travel, history, and literature, Teju Cole solidifies his place as one of today’s most powerful and original voices. On page after page, deploying prose dense with beauty and ideas, he finds fresh and potent ways to interpret art, people, and historical moments, taking in subjects from Virginia Woolf, Shakespeare, and W. G. Sebald to Instagram, Barack Obama, and Boko Haram. Cole brings us new considerations of James Baldwin in the age of Black Lives Matter; the African American photographer Roy DeCarava, who, forced to shoot with film calibrated exclusively for white skin tones, found his way to a startling and true depiction of black subjects; and (in an essay that inspired both praise and pushback when it first appeared) the White Savior Industrial Complex, the system by which African nations are sentimentally aided by an America “developed on pillage.”

 

Known and Strange Things -  - <span class="date-display-single">04/14/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

19

Nov

Empire of Imagination

Michael Witwer

11/19/2016 - 4:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

The pioneering biography of geek and gaming culture's mythic icon, Gary Gygax, and the complete story behind the invention of Dungeons & Dragons. Empire of Imagination is the dynamic life story of Gary Gygax, from his childhood in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, to his untimely death in 2008. Gygax's magnum opus, Dungeons & Dragons, would explode in popularity throughout the 1970s and '80s and irreversibly alter the world of gaming. D&D is the best-known, bestselling role-playing game of all time. Gygax's involvement in the gaming industry lasted long after his dramatic and involuntary departure from D&D's parent company, TSR, and his footprint can still be seen in the genre of gaming that he is largely responsible for creating. But as Witwer shows, perhaps the most compelling facet of Gygax's life and work was his unwavering commitment to the power of creativity in the face of myriad sources of adversity—cultural, economic, and personal. With a narrative-driven style that elegantly captures the drama of those early days of D&D, Witwer has written an engaging chronicle of the life and legacy of this emperor of the imagination.

Empire of Imagination -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/19/2016 - 4:00pm</span>

16

Mar

In the Kitchen with a Good Appetite

Melissa Clark

03/16/2017 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Madison Room

Presented in partnership with the UW-Madison Center for the Humanities, food writer and cookbook author Melissa Clark discusses being a staff reporter for the New York Times Food section, where she writes the popular column “A Good Appetite” and appears in a weekly cooking video series. Melissa has written thirty-eight cookbooks, including her latest, DinnerChanging the Game, to be published in March 2017.

In the Kitchen with a Good Appetite -  - <span class="date-display-single">03/16/2017 - 7:30pm</span>

13

Mar

The Confessions of Young Nero

Margaret George

03/13/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Behind each Roman Emperor’s climb to power lie the grand ambitions and chilling machinations of those closest to him. And none match the spectacularly theatrical and fraught sequences that carried the sixteen-year-old Nero from the periphery of the royal family directly into the palace and then placed him on its throne.

 

The Confessions of Young Nero -  - <span class="date-display-single">03/13/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

20

Oct

You Can't Touch My Hair

Phoebe Robinson

10/20/2016 - 9:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

You Can't Touch My Hair: And Other Things I Still Have to Explain is a keenly observed, humorous essay collection from the celebrated stand-up comedian and WNYC podcaster (2 Dope Queens, Sooo Many White Guys), in which she discusses what it's like to be the black friend or labeled the angry black woman, how to cope with those who have white guilt, and, of course, why you can't touch her hair. Phoebe also comments on controversial topics and expresses the ugly truths in race, gender and pop culture such as:
 
#femalepresident: “When you get sworn into office, yell, “I’m a feminist,” and then throw your fist in the air like you’re Judd Nelson at the end of The Breakfast Club.
 
#staywoke: “If you want to know what a quintessential stay woke person is, then you don’t have to look any further than Janet Jackson’s character in Poetic Justice.”
 
#goodhair: “Black women will, through the course of a lifetime, spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on styling; black women clutch shower caps in their hands with the same fervor priests do rosary beads in an exorcism movie.”
 

You Can't Touch My Hair -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/20/2016 - 9:00pm</span>

17

Jan

If Our Bodies Could Talk

James Hamblin

01/17/2017 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

Presented in Partnership with the UW-Madison Center for the Humanities, an enlightening book about how bodies work—and how to keep them working in a world full of myths and misinformation.
 
In 2014, James Hamblin launched a series of videos for The Atlantic called "If Our Bodies Could Talk."  With it, the doctor-turned-journalist established himself as a seriously entertaining authority in the field of health. Now, in illuminating and genuinely funny prose, Hamblin explores the human stories behind health questions that never seem to go away—and which tend to be mischaracterized and oversimplified by marketing and news media.  He covers topics such as sleep, aging, diet, and much more: 
 
• Can I “boost” my immune system?
• Does caffeine make me live longer?
• Do we still not know if cell phones cause cancer?
• How much sleep do I actually need?
• Is there any harm in taking a multivitamin?
• Is life long enough?
 

If Our Bodies Could Talk -  - <span class="date-display-single">01/17/2017 - 7:00pm</span>

20

Oct

Examples of Anything

Will Santino

10/20/2016 - 9:00am

Central Library

Examples of Anything is unlike anything you've ever read. It's a novel. It's a poem. It's a painting. It's a portrait, composed of moments and memories, of what it's like to be alive. From the mind of artist Will Kiley Santino, Examples of Anything is a radically new style of storytelling. Open up to any page or start at the beginning. Read in any direction. Follow signs or forge your own path. Get lost in these pages and you're guaranteed to make it out more alive than before.​ For this year's Wisconsin Book Festival, Will is bringing the pages of Examples of Anything to life in a flowing exhibit spread throughout Madison Central Library.  

Examples of Anything -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/20/2016 - 9:00am</span>

05

Oct

Celebrate Dyslexia Awareness Month

Children's Dyslexia Center-Madison

10/05/2016 - 5:30pm

Central Library - Children's Program Room

An estimated 60 million Americans are dyslexic, roughly 1 of every 5 people! But how much do we know about this invisible disability? Join staff, students, and families from Madison's Children's Dyslexia Center to learn more about dyslexia and how we can all support our kids, students, friends, and neighbors who struggle to read printed words.
 
A light dinner will be served before a short film screening and a brief panel discussion highlighting local resources. Young people ages 8 and up especially welcome! RSVPs to youth@madisonpubliclibrary.org or 266-6345 are appreciated but not required.

Celebrate Dyslexia Awareness Month -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/05/2016 - 5:30pm</span>

20

Oct

Friends of the Madison Public Library Fall Book Sale

Friends of Madison Public Library

10/20/2016 - 9:00am

Central Library

Find great bargains for your home library and support the library!  This sale features books, DVDs and other materials of all types.  Most items are $2 or less.  Hosted by the Friends of the Madison Public Library in conjunction with the Wisconsin Book Festival.  Sale runs November 2-5. Sale hours: Thursday, November 2, 9 am - 9 pm, Friday, November 3, 9 am - 9 pm, Saturday, November 4, 9 am - 9 pm; Sunday, November 5, 11 am - 2 pm.

Friends of the Madison Public Library Fall Book Sale -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/20/2016 - 9:00am</span>

21

Oct

High School Friday 2016

10/21/2016 - 9:00am

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

This is a great opportunity for high school students in Madison to experience a wide-range of book-related programming and see many of the exciting programs offered by Madison Public Library. A program-rich schedule is designed to engage students in the Wisconsin Common Core Standards within a dynamic learning environment. Through meaningful interaction with authors, poets, and peers, students will see themselves as active members of the Madison community. They will gain confidence, exposure, and insight while applying skills in reading, writing, language, speaking, and listening in the real world.  The focus of this year’s High School Friday is to highlight the diverse ways cultural programs encourage students to edify, educate, and explore.
 
Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis and will be limited to 200 students. Register by emailing Conor Moran at cmoran@mplfoundation.org.
 
Giving Voice: First Wave Performance
 

High School Friday 2016 -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/21/2016 - 9:00am</span>

02

Sep

Ten Ways Not To Commit Suicide

Darryl "DMC" McDaniels

09/02/2016 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

Legendary artist Darryl DMC McDaniels had it all—public adulation, the respect of his peers, money, and celebrity status. But, it all imploded when, overwhelmed by such success at a young age, he sank into a world of depression, alcoholism, and regular thoughts of suicide. In his brutally frank memoir, TEN WAYS NOT TO COMMIT SUICIDE, McDaniels recounts his slide into emotional darkness and the ways he worked to rise out of his depression and embrace the gift of life. McDaniels’s story has particular resonance in our time, with a rising epidemic of suicide among black men. Indeed, suicide is the #3 leading cause of death among African Americans.
 

Ten Ways Not To Commit Suicide -  - <span class="date-display-single">09/02/2016 - 7:00pm</span>

22

Oct

Finding an Agent Workshop

Chloe Benjamin

10/22/2016 - 3:00pm

Central Library - First Floor Conference Room

During the publication process, literary agents act as middlemen, matching manuscripts with publishing houses—but how does an author find an agent? In this seminar, we’ll explore each step of the process, from effectively targeting agents to writing query letters to crafting synopses and writing samples. This two-hour course is suitable for writers who would like to learn more about the agenting process, but it is ideal for those with book projects, as there will be opportunities to develop query materials based on a specific project. Capacity has been met.

Finding an Agent Workshop -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 3:00pm</span>

08

Sep

Wisconsin Storytime

09/08/2016 - 6:00pm

Central Library - Diane Endres Ballweg Gallery

For the month of September only, the Bubbler is delighted to host Wisconsin Storytime from Project Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Book Festival. In 2014, Project Wisconsin created a weekly collaboration with 52 different Wisconsin designers and artists. Each week a different designer presented their take on a different story from Wisconsin’s glorious past. With everything from Camp Randall, to Chris Farley, to the Apostle Islands, and Ringling Brothers, these incredible designs encompass the diversity of talent in this pool of artists as well as the diversity of Wisconsin stories. will open September 8th in the Diane Endres Ballweg Gallery on the 3rd floor of Madison’s Central Library. Join Wisconsin Storytime at the opening reception with drinks by Forequarter and a chance to meet many of Wisconsin Storytime’s designers. Limited edition books of each of the designs will also be available for purchase.

Wisconsin Storytime -  - <span class="date-display-single">09/08/2016 - 6:00pm</span>

22

Oct

The Politics of Resentment

Kathy Cramer

10/22/2016 - 6:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

Since the election of Scott Walker, Wisconsin has been seen as ground zero for debates about the appropriate role of government. In a time of rising inequality, Walker not only survived a bitterly contested recall that brought thousands of protesters to Capitol Square, he was subsequently reelected. How could this happen? How is it that the very people who stand to benefit from strong government services not only vote against the candidates who support those services but are vehemently against the very idea of big government?
 

The Politics of Resentment -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 6:00pm</span>

22

Oct

The Millionaire and The Bard

Andrea Mays

10/22/2016 - 4:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

Presented as part of the Year of Shakespeare in Wisconsin, Andrea Mays tells the miraculous and romantic story of Shakespeare’s First Folio, and of the American industrialist whose thrilling pursuit of the book became a lifelong obsession.  When Shakespeare died in 1616, half of his plays died with him. No one—not even their author—believed that his writings would last. In 1623, seven years after his death, Shakespeare’s business partners, companions, and fellow actors gathered copies of his plays and manuscripts and published thirty-six of them. This massive book, the First Folio, was intended as a memorial to their deceased friend. They could not have known that it would become one of the most important books ever published in the English language.
 

The Millionaire and The Bard -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 4:30pm</span>

22

Oct

Finding the Flavors We Lost

Patric Kuh

10/22/2016 - 8:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

The multiple-James Beard Award–winning restaurant critic for Los Angeles Magazine delivers an arresting exploration of our cultural demand for “artisanal” foods in a world dominated by corporate agribusiness. We hear the word “artisanal” all the time—attached to cheese, chocolate, coffee, even fast-food chain sandwiches—but what does it actually mean? We take “farm to table” and “handcrafted food” for granted now but how did we get here? In Finding the Flavors We Lost, acclaimed food writer Patric Kuh profiles major figures in the so-called “artisanal” food movement who brought exceptional taste back to food and inspired chefs and restaurateurs to redefine and rethink the way we eat.
 

Finding the Flavors We Lost -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 8:00pm</span>

22

Oct

Lions

Bonnie Nadzam

10/22/2016 - 6:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

From the winner of the Center for Fiction Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize, an elegiac and arresting novel about a young couple whose love—and everything they know to be true—is threatened by the arrival of an unwelcome stranger in their collapsing east Colorado town.
 
Lions is set on the high plains of Colorado, a nearly deserted place, steeped in local legends and sparse in population. Built to be a glorious western city upon a hill, it was never fit for farming, mining, trading, or any of the illusory sources of wealth its pioneers imagined. The Walkers have been settled on its barren terrain for generations—a simple family in a town otherwise still chasing dreams of bigger, better, brighter. 
 

Lions -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 6:00pm</span>

22

Oct

The Matchmakers of Minnow Bay

Kelly Harms

10/22/2016 - 12:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

In The Matchmakers of Minnow Bay, Madison author Kelly Harms trains her eye on the love lives of Lily Stewart and Ben Hutchinson. Lily, at a crossroads in her life, is ready to throw in the towel and abandon her beloved apartment in the city for cheaper pastures. But, in the process of packing away her possessions, she finds—oops!—a letter in her junk drawer requiring further action to finalize the annulment of a long-forgotten Vegas wedding from…10 years ago!  Meanwhile, recently having left a lucrative career in app development behind to return to his hometown of Minnow Bay, WI, Ben is enjoying a quiet life off the grid…when, Lily, the wife he didn’t know he had, shows up on his doorstep.

The Matchmakers of Minnow Bay -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 12:00pm</span>

22

Oct

Against Everything

Mark Greif

10/22/2016 - 4:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Presented in partnership with the UW-Madison Center for the Humanities, from n+1 founding editor Mark Greif, a young writer who is already a star in the intellectual firmament, comes Against Everything, a brilliant collection of critical essays—a book of scope and acuity worthy to be mentioned in the same breath as Susan Sontag's Against Interpretation and Joan Didion's Slouching Towards Bethlehem.
 

Against Everything -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 4:30pm</span>

22

Oct

Atlas Obscura

Ella Morton

10/22/2016 - 9:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

It's time to get off the beaten path. Inspiring equal parts wonder and wanderlust, Atlas Obscura celebrates over 700 of the strangest and most curious places in the world.
 
Talk about a bucket list: here are natural wonders—the dazzling glowworm caves in New Zealand, or a baobob tree in South Africa that's so large it has a pub inside where 15 people can drink comfortably. Architectural marvels, including the M.C. Escher-like stepwells in India. Mind-boggling events, like the Baby Jumping Festival in Spain, where men dressed as devils literally vault over rows of squirming infants. Not to mention the Great Stalacpipe Organ in Virginia, Turkmenistan's 40-year hole of fire called the Gates of Hell, a graveyard for decommissioned ships on the coast of Bangladesh, eccentric bone museums in Italy, or a weather-forecasting invention that was powered by leeches, still on display in Devon, England.
 

Atlas Obscura -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 9:00pm</span>

22

Oct

The Way to the Spring

Ben Ehrenreich

10/22/2016 - 12:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

Ben Ehrenreich first started reporting from the West Bank in 2011, on an assignment for Harper’s magazine.  He went back again for the New York Times the following year, which resulted in a powerful, much talked-about cover-story for the magazine.  Palestine, it seemed, had gotten under Ehrenreich’s skin.   
 
Eventually he moved to Ramallah, and started writing what would become The Way to The Spring: Life and Death in Palestine. Ehrenreich was moved by the injustices that he witnessed, and by the general silence about them in most U.S. media.  As well informed as he was on the Arab-Israeli conflict, he nonetheless was consistently shocked by what he saw, and by how little the vast majority of people in the U.S. (and even in Israel, just few miles away) understood about the lived realities of the occupation.  He felt strongly that he wanted to write to break through those silences.
 

The Way to the Spring -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 12:00pm</span>

20

Oct

Writing Professionals Panel

Amy Hassinger Michelle Wildgen Susan Gloss

10/20/2016 - 5:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

The Day Job: How To Make Money And Write And Not Lose Your Mind. There's a reason writers obsess about money: it's hard to come by in the literary business. All three panelists are accomplished novelists who also work other jobs: Amy Hassinger teaches at the University of Nebraska MFA in Writing Program and works as a freelance editor, Michelle Wildgen is a cofounder of the Madison Writers’ Studio and editor at Tin House Magazine, and Susan Gloss Parsons is an attorney and Etsy shop owner. The three will discuss their own successes and failures at making a living and making art, and how the two might even work together. We'll welcome questions and contributions from the audience. 

Writing Professionals Panel -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/20/2016 - 5:30pm</span>

20

Oct

The Making of a Book: Writing, Editing, and Small Press Publication

Jeremiah Lewis

10/20/2016 - 5:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Snow Creek Press co-founder Jeremiah Lewis will discuss the long journey Snow Creek took publishing their first book, including writing Capernaum and how the book evolved from nearly 1,000 pages long to the lean novel it is today. Lewis will discuss honing the book through editing, from addressing tense issues throughout the stream-of-consciousness narrative to reworking scenes and lines to make a more cohesive structure. Jeremiah will describe how Snow Creek Press emerged as a direct result of his collaboration with Louis Lo Praeste on Capernaum and what the plans for the press are in the future.
 
About Capernaum:
 

The Making of a Book: Writing, Editing, and Small Press Publication -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/20/2016 - 5:30pm</span>

23

Oct

All the Little Liars

Charlaine Harris

10/23/2016 - 1:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

After a thirteen year hiatus, Harris triumphantly returns to the series which began her successful career. All The Little Liars picks up where we left off, with Aurora Teagarden just married to her true love, crime writer Robin Crusoe, and the couple is basking in the news of her pregnancy.
 
But then disaster strikes the small Georgia town: four kids vanish from the school soccer field in an afternoon. Aurora’s 15-year-old brother Phillip is one of them. Also gone are two of his friends, and an 11-year-old girl who was just hoping to get a ride home from soccer practice.  And then there’s an even worse discovery—at the kids’ last known destination, a dead body.

All the Little Liars -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/23/2016 - 1:30pm</span>

20

Oct

America Invertida

Jesse Lee Kercheval

10/20/2016 - 5:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

América Invertida: An Anthology of Emerging Uruguayan Poets introduces twenty-two Uruguayan poets under the age of forty to English-speaking audiences for the first time. Editor Jesse Lee Kercheval paired poets and translators to produce a rich, bilingual volume based on a multicultural dialogue about poetry and the written word. América Invertida presents Spanish poems and their English translations side by side to give readers an introduction to Uruguay’s vibrant literary scene. Poet Joyelle McSweeney says of América Invertida, “the poets are mystic, down-to-earth, demanding, reserved, ecstatic, intimate, and prophetic, turn by turn by turn.” National Poetry Series winner Eduardo C. Corral calls América Invertida “a gorgeous bridge into Uruguay.”

America Invertida -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/20/2016 - 5:30pm</span>

22

Oct

The Hopefuls

Jennifer Close

10/22/2016 - 3:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

From the best­selling author of Girls in White Dresses, a glorious send­up of young D.C. and a blazingly honest portrait of a marriage­­. When Beth arrives in Washington, D.C., she hates everything about it: the confusing traffic circles, the ubiquitous Ann Taylor suits, the humidity that descends each summer. At dinner parties, guests compare their security clearance levels. They leave their BlackBerrys on the table. They speak in acronyms. And once they realize Beth doesn't work in politics, they smile blandly and turn away. But when Beth and her husband, Matt, meet a charismatic White House staffer named Jimmy, and his wife, Ashleigh, the four become inseparable, coordinating brunch, birthdays, and long weekends away. Then: as Jimmy's star rises higher and higher, their friendship­­ and Beth's relationship with Matt­­ is threatened by jealousy, competition, and the inevitable rumors.

The Hopefuls -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 3:00pm</span>

22

Oct

On Fourth Lake: A Social History of Lake Mendota

Don Sanford

10/22/2016 - 10:30am

Central Library - Local History Room

On Fourth Lake: A Social History of Lake Mendota is the story of the people, places, and events that have shaped the shoreline of Lake Mendota, Madison’s greatest lake. It is the story of Native people, settlers, iceboaters, sailors, fishers, hunters, explorers, politicians, entertainers, lifeguards, boat captains, inventors, scientists, and Olympians, much of it in their own words. Don spent over a decade preparing this social history of Lake Mendota. His work combines the personal experiences of people who lived, worked, and played on the lake with the events that shaped Madison, the Badger State, and the nation.
 
The first book of its kind, On Fourth Lake takes the reader on a guided tour around Lake Mendota, looking at the lakeshore from the water. It is richly illustrated with more than 500 maps, newspaper articles, and photographs. Many of the images were sourced from private collections and have never before been available to the public. This book is a must-have for anyone who spends time on Lake Mendota or has an interest in the history of Madison and Dane County.

On Fourth Lake: A Social History of Lake Mendota -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 10:30am</span>

22

Oct

We Gon' Be Alright

Jeff Chang

10/22/2016 - 3:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

In these provocative, powerful essays acclaimed writer/journalist Jeff Chang, author of Can’t Stop Won’t Stop and Who We Be, takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, passionately personal writing, and distinguished cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. He argues that resegregation is the unexamined condition of our time, the undoing of which is key to moving the nation forward to racial justice and cultural equity.

We Gon' Be Alright -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 3:00pm</span>

22

Oct

Utopia is Creepy

Nicholas Carr

10/22/2016 - 1:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

A freewheeling, sharp-shooting indictment of a tech-besotted culture.  With a razor wit, Nicholas Carr cuts through Silicon Valley’s unsettlingly cheery vision of the technological future to ask a hard question: Have we been seduced by a lie? Gathering a decade’s worth of posts from his blog, Rough Type, as well as his seminal essays, Utopia Is Creepy offers an alternative history of the digital age, chronicling its roller-coaster crazes and crashes, its blind triumphs, and its unintended consequences.
 
Carr’s favorite targets are those zealots who believe so fervently in computers and data that they abandon common sense. Cheap digital tools do not make us all the next Fellini or Dylan. Social networks, diverting as they may be, are not vehicles for self-enlightenment. And “likes” and retweets are not going to elevate political discourse. When we expect technologies—designed for profit—to deliver a paradise of prosperity and convenience, we have forgotten ourselves. In response, Carr offers searching assessments of the future of work, the fate of reading, and the rise of artificial intelligence, challenging us to see our world anew.
 

Utopia is Creepy -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 1:30pm</span>

21

Oct

A Perfect Score

Craig Hall

10/21/2016 - 7:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Craig and Kathryn Hall recount their twenty-year climb from amateur winemakers to recipients of an elusive perfect score from Robert Parker's Wine Advocate. The Halls launched themselves head first into Napa Valley 20 years ago with the purchase of their first vineyard and never looked back. Since then, their critically acclaimed HALL Wines and WALT Wines have become fixtures of the California wine industry, winning numerous accolades including now, two coveted 100-point "perfect scores."
 
A Perfect Score weaves a vibrant tale of the HALL brand's rise to success, Napa Valley's tug-of-war between localism and tourism, and the evolving nature of the wine industry as a whole. Readers who love a good glass of wine will find much to savor in the Halls' expert account of the art, soul, and business of a modern winery.  Samples of wine will be offered.

A Perfect Score -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/21/2016 - 7:30pm</span>

22

Oct

The Song Poet

Kao Kalia Yang

10/22/2016 - 10:30am

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

In the Hmong tradition, the song poet is the keeper of the stories of his people: their history, tragedies, joys and losses; it is he who invokes the spirits and the homeland. The Song Poet introduces a young Bee, orphaned as a child, and we watch as he grows into his art—collecting the whispers and words of the people around him and giving them voice. His songs follow as he grows into manhood in a Laos ruined by war, as he is forced into a Thai refugee camp, and then into exile. They follow him all the way to a St. Paul housing project where crushing work and poverty, and the death of Bee’s mother, eventually drive them away, though not before Bee has forged a better way for his children. In Yang’s deft hands, The Song Poet is, at once, the story of a father’s legacy—both the beauty of his poetry and the stories born in his children—as well as a profound look at the realities of the refugee experience, the before and the after.
 
Like Yang’s earlier book, The Song Poet is a love story—of a daughter for her father, a father for his children, a people for their land, their traditions, and all that they have lost.

The Song Poet -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 10:30am</span>

22

Oct

I Will Send Rain

Rae Meadows

10/22/2016 - 10:30am

Central Library - The Bubbler

From its first page, I Will Send Rain is a story you feel, as the family at its center—and more broadly, their town—comes undone by the relentless waves of grit and dust that marked the Dust Bowl years. In the Bells, Meadows delivers an uncommon family portrait. Untethered by daily drought and storms that leave layers of dirt on counters, pies, in hair, eyes and throats, each in the family harbors a secret dream of escape: through a first love, through faith, by way of a far-away city and a man who will take you there. And for Fred, the youngest Bell, in a rich world of his own creation. Neighbors leave, secrets accrue, and finally tragedy strikes, leaving the Bells fighting for their footing, fumbling for mercy and meaning in the face of the incomprehensible.
 
Meadows’s singular gift as a writer makes this novel sing. I Will Send Rain is a piercing story of motherhood and family, resilience, longing, fierce love, and in the end, hope. It’s story that will stay with you long after you turn the last page.

I Will Send Rain -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 10:30am</span>

21

Oct

American Panic

Mark Stein

10/21/2016 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

On some level, nearly every American falls victim to political panic, and the hype, intensity and propaganda that come with it. Such panics have been occurring among Americans since the 1692 Salem witch hunt, and they have continued in a number of forms, and with various targets. Mark Stein, author of the wildly popular How the States Got Their Shapes, traces this fascinating, frightening, and recurring by-product of the American psyche in his new book, American Panic: A History of Who Scares Us and Why. By tracing the history, consequences, and recurring patterns that exist in American political panics, Stein sheds new light on what it is that causes Americans to succumb to these fears generation after generation.
 

American Panic -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/21/2016 - 7:30pm</span>

21

Oct

Last Night's Reading

Kate Gavino

10/21/2016 - 9:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

Why do we go to book readings? For a chance to see the authors we love come to life off the page, answering our questions and proving to be the brilliant, witty people we catch glimpses of through their work. Illustrator Kate Gavino captures the wonder of this experience firsthand. At every reading she attends, Kate hand-letters the event’s most memorable quote alongside a charming portrait of the author. In Last Night’s Reading, Kate takes us on her journey through the literary world, sharing illustrated insight from more than one hundred of today’s greatest writers—including Zadie Smith, Junot Diaz, Lev Grossman, Elizabeth Gilbert, and many more—on topics ranging from friendship and humor to creativity and identity. A celebration of authors, reading, and bookstores, this delightful collection is an advice book like no other and a love letter to the joy of seeing your favorite author up close and personal.

Last Night's Reading -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/21/2016 - 9:00pm</span>

22

Oct

Be A Friend / Penguin's Christmas Wish

Salina Yoon

10/22/2016 - 10:30am

Central Library - Children's Section

Salina Yoon presents her two latest children's books.
 
About Be A Friend:
 
What’s black, white, and red all over? Dennis! But everyone calls him mime boy because he expresses himself in extraordinary ways. Some children do show-and- tell, but Dennis mimes his. Some kids like to climb a tree, Dennis is happy to be a tree. But being a mime can be lonely. And it isn’t until Dennis meets a girl named Joy that he discovers the power of friendship—and how special he truly is! Countless readers have already fallen in love with Salina Yoon’s gorgeous art and familiar and loveable characters, like Penguin and Bear. Now in Be a Friend, Yoon showcases her talent in a brand new way, wrapping a simple yet emotionally rich story in a beautiful package. A heartwarming story of self-acceptance, courage, and unbreakable friendship for anyone who has ever felt different.
 
About Penguin's Christmas Wish:
 

Be A Friend / Penguin's Christmas Wish -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 10:30am</span>

23

Oct

North of Dixie

Mark Speltz

10/23/2016 - 10:30am

Central Library - Community Room 302

The history of the civil rights movement is commonly illustrated with well-known photographs from Birmingham, Montgomery, and Selma—leaving the visual story of the movement outside the South remaining to be told. In North of Dixie, historian Mark Speltz shines a light past the most iconic photographs of the era to focus on images of everyday activists who fought campaigns against segregation, police brutality, and job discrimination in Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, and many other cities.
 

North of Dixie -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/23/2016 - 10:30am</span>

23

Oct

Performing New Lives

Jonathan Shailor

10/23/2016 - 12:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

Presented as part of the Year of Shakespeare in Wisconsin, Jonathan Shailor will discuss his book, and will share the most recent chapter of his remarkable journey, as revealed in the writings of the prisoners who were a part of it.
 

Performing New Lives -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/23/2016 - 12:00pm</span>

09

Nov

I Must Be Living Twice

Eileen Myles

11/09/2016 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Bubbler

Presented in partnership with the FELIX Series of New Writing, Eileen Myles will discuss their latest book of poetry I Must Be Living Twice and their 1994 novel Chelsea Girls.
 
About I Must Be Living Twice: New & Selected Poems:
A collection of thrilling verse, including both new poems and beloved favorites, from the celebrated poet, modern cult icon, and author of Chelsea Girls. Eileen Myles’ work is known for its blend of reality and fiction, the sublime and the ephemeral. Their work opens readers to astonishing new considerations of familiar places, like the East Village in their iconic Chelsea Girls, and invites them into lush—and sometimes horrid—dream worlds, imbuing the landscapes of their writing with the vividness and energy of fantasy. I Must Be Living Twice brings together selections from the poet’s previous work with a set of bold new poems that reflect their sardonic, unapologetic, and fiercely intellectual literary voice. Steeped in the culture of New York City, Myles’ milieu, I Must Be Living Twice is a prism refracting a radical world and a compelling life.
 
About Chelsea Girls:

I Must Be Living Twice -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/09/2016 - 7:00pm</span>

19

Sep

The Assassination Complex

Jeremy Scahill

09/19/2016 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

Presented in partnership with WORT, bestselling author Jeremy Scahill and his colleagues at the investigative website The Intercept expose major revelations about the US government’s drone program and stunning new details about America’s secret assassination policy.
 

When the US government discusses drone strikes publicly, it offers assurances that such operations are a more precise alternative to troops on the ground and are authorized only when an “imminent” threat is present and there is “near certainty” that the intended target will be killed. The implicit message on drone strikes from the Obama administration has been trust, but don’t verify.  The online magazine The Intercept exploded this secrecy when it obtained a cache of secret slides that provide a window into the inner workings of the US military’s kill/capture operations in Afghanistan, Yemen, and Somalia. Whether through the use of drones, night raids, or new platforms yet to be employed, these documents show assassination to be central to US counterterrorism policy.
 

The Assassination Complex -  - <span class="date-display-single">09/19/2016 - 7:00pm</span>

22

Oct

The Sympathizer & Nothing Ever Dies

Viet Thanh Nguyen

10/22/2016 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

Presented in partnership with the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Pulitzer Prize winning author Viet Thanh Nguyen will discuss his two latest books.
 
About The Sympathizer:
 

The Sympathizer & Nothing Ever Dies -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 7:30pm</span>

21

Oct

Murder on the Quai

Cara Black

10/21/2016 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

The world knows Aimée Leduc, heroine of 15 mysteries in this New York Times bestselling series, as a très chic, no-nonsense private investigator—the toughest and most relentless in Paris. Now, author Cara Black dips back in time to reveal how Aimée first became a detective . . .
 
November 1989: Aimée Leduc is in her first year of college at Paris’s preeminent medical school. She lives in a 17th-century apartment that overlooks the Seine with her father, who runs the family detective agency.
 

Murder on the Quai -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/21/2016 - 7:30pm</span>

21

Oct

Wisconsin on the Air

Jack Mitchell

10/21/2016 - 6:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

Peek behind the microphones in this history of Wisconsin Public Radio. The new Wisconsin Historical Society Press broadcasting biography deftly maps the nation's 100-year public broadcasting journey, begun in 1917, by charting the transmissions and transitions of the Wisconsin broadcasters who invented and transformed the media.
 
Author Jack Mitchell, who developed National Public Radio's All Things Considered before becoming the head of Wisconsin Public Radio, centers this public broadcasting history around the implementation of the "Wisconsin Idea" philosophy that drove its development and still sets its course. Along the way, Mitchell introduces readers to the personalities and philosophies, funding challenges and legislation, and original programming and pioneering technology that gave us public broadcasting.

Wisconsin on the Air -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/21/2016 - 6:00pm</span>

23

Oct

The History and Uncertain Future of Handwriting

Anne Trubek

10/23/2016 - 12:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Today, our grocery and to-do lists live on our smart phones, and it’s rare that we pick up a pen except to sign a check. Signatures—far from John Hancock’s elegant model—have become mere scribble. Fewer and fewer schoolchildren are being taught how to write in cursive. In The History and Uncertain Future of Handwriting, Anne Trubek argues that the decline and even elimination of handwriting from daily life does not signal a decline in civilization, but rather the next stage in the evolution of communication.
 

The History and Uncertain Future of Handwriting -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/23/2016 - 12:00pm</span>

20

Oct

Scriptorium: Poems

Melissa Range

10/20/2016 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Bubbler

A National Poetry Series winner, selected and with a foreword by Tracy K. Smith. The poems in Scriptorium are primarily concerned with questions of religious authority. The medieval scriptorium, the central image of the collection, stands for that authority but also for its subversion; it is both a place where religious ideas are codified in writing and a place where an individual scribe might, with a sly movement of the pen, express unorthodox religious thoughts and experiences. In addition to exploring the ways language is used, or abused, to claim religious authority, Scriptorium also addresses the authority of the vernacular in various time periods and places, particularly in the Appalachian slang of the author’s East Tennessee upbringing. Throughout Scriptorium, the historical mingles with the personal: poems about medieval art, theology, and verse share space with poems that chronicle personal struggles with faith and doubt.

Scriptorium: Poems -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/20/2016 - 7:00pm</span>

23

Oct

Much Ado: A Summer with a Repertory Theater Company

Michael Lenehan

10/23/2016 - 10:30am

Central Library - Community Room 301

Presented in partnership with the Year of Shakespeare in Wisconsin, Much Ado provides readers with an intimate, behind-the-scenes look at the lauded American Players Theatre, focusing on its 2014 production of William Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing.
 
Regional repertory theater is a wellspring of American cultural life. Not beholden to the pressures of Broadway, far-flung companies are able to put on productions of impressive size, scope, and quality—inspiring Time to declare that regional theater proves “all the country’s a stage.” The American Players Theatre, founded in 1979 in the very small town of Spring Green, Wisconsin, is no exception. The Wall Street Journal’s Terry Teachout has called the APT “the best classical theater company in America.” It’s also one of the must successful, with an annual budget of $6 million and a total of more than 100,000 tickets sold each season.
 

Much Ado: A Summer with a Repertory Theater Company  -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/23/2016 - 10:30am</span>

22

Oct

The Midnight Star

Marie Lu

10/22/2016 - 1:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

The thrilling finale to the New York Times bestselling Young Elites series from "hit factory" Marie Lu. There was once a time when darkness shrouded the world, and the darkness had a queen. Adelina Amouteru is done suffering. She's turned her back on those who have betrayed her and achieved the ultimate revenge: victory. Her reign as the White Wolf has been a triumphant one, but with each conquest her cruelty only grows. The darkness within her has begun to spiral out of control, threatening to destroy what she's achieved. When a new danger appears, Adelina's forced to revisit old wounds, putting not only herself at risk, but every Elite. In order to preserve her empire, Adelina and her Roses must join the Daggers on a perilous quest--though this uneasy alliance may prove to be the real danger.  New York Times #1 bestselling author Marie Lu concludes Adelina's story with this haunting and hypnotizing final installment to the Young Elites series.

The Midnight Star -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 1:30pm</span>

20

Oct

The Excellent Lombards

Jane Hamilton

10/20/2016 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

Mary Francis “Frankie” Lombard is deeply in love with her family’s sprawling apple orchard and the tangled web of family members who inhabit it.  Content to spend her days planning capers with her brother William, one-upping her bratty cousin Amanda, and expertly tending the orchard, Frankie desires nothing more than for the rhythm of life to continue undisturbed. But change is inevitable, and threats of urbanization, disinheritance, and college applications shake the foundation of Frankie’s roots.  As Frankie is forced to shed her childhood fantasies and face the possibility of losing the idyllic future she had envisioned for her family, she must decide whether loving something means clinging tightly or letting go.

The Excellent Lombards -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/20/2016 - 7:30pm</span>

23

Oct

Book of Hulga

Rita Mae Reese

10/23/2016 - 12:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Part fan fiction, part hagiography, part graphic poetry, The Book of Hulga wrestles with the long shadow of Flannery O’Connor, a Southern Catholic writer who wrote about roadside killers, racists, and wooden legs. The poems ask what use can be made of suffering and in what ways are we defined by absence, and they look to the same sources that O’Connor looked to for answers, ranging from Edgar Allan Poe to the French philosopher Simone Weil. The Book of Hulga allows the reader to get closer to O’Connor while also acknowledging that each of us has an inner Hulga, a self that rigidly refuses joy, but who just might find it anyway.
 
Nine original illustrations by Julie Franki further illuminate this verse biography of an imagined modern-day hillbilly saint.

Book of Hulga -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/23/2016 - 12:00pm</span>

03

Oct

Perfume River

Robert Olen Butler

10/03/2016 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

From one of America’s most important writers, Perfume River is an exquisite novel that examines family ties and the legacy of the Vietnam War through the portrait of a single North Florida family.
 

Perfume River -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/03/2016 - 7:00pm</span>

21

Oct

Under the Harrow

Flynn Berry

10/21/2016 - 6:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Flynn Berry’s debut novel is a chilling story with a slow-burning feeling of dread, a sophisticated psychological edge, and a sharpness that Gillian Flynn fans will love. Beneath the mystery of Under the Harrow is a heartbreakingly honest portrait of sisterhood’s contradictions and complexities: jealousy, rivalry, long-held grudges, devotion, unspoken understanding, and forgiveness. Berry’s spare, elegant writing is thrilling, dominated by emotion yet subtly anchored by details that stick in your head as vividly as your own memories. Her gift for capturing the extraordinary emotions of trauma recalls many of her favorite contemporary writers: Kate Atkinson, Tessa Hadley, and Paula Hawkins. Under the Harrow is a thrilling and heartbreaking novel that will stay with readers long after they discover its surprising resolution.

Under the Harrow -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/21/2016 - 6:00pm</span>

23

Sep

Lithium Jesus: A Memoir of Mania

Charles Monroe-Kane

09/23/2016 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

Charles Monroe-Kane is a natural raconteur, and boy, does he have stories to tell. Born into an eccentric Ohio clan of modern hunter-gatherers, he grew up hearing voices in his head. Over a dizzying two decades, he was many things—teenage faith healer, world traveler, smuggler, liberation theologian, ladder-maker, squatter, halibut hanger, grifter, environmental warrior, and circus manager—all the while wrestling with schizophrenia and self-medication.
 
From Baby Doc’s Haiti to the Czech Velvet Revolution, and from sex, drugs, and a stabbing to public humiliation by the leader of the free world, Monroe-Kane burns through his twenties and several bridges of youthful idealism before finally saying: enough. In a memoir that blends engaging charm with unflinching frankness, Monroe-Kane gives his testimony of mental illness, drug abuse, faith, and love. By the end of Lithium Jesus there may be a voice in your head, too, saying “Do more, be more, live more. And fear less.”

Lithium Jesus: A Memoir of Mania -  - <span class="date-display-single">09/23/2016 - 7:00pm</span>

02

Aug

Going for Wisconsin Gold

Jessie Garcia

08/02/2016 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Third Floor

U-S-A! U-S-A! That familiar refrain is heard in every Olympics, but truly it could be "Wis-con-sin! Wis-con-sin!" Since pioneering hurdler Alvin Kraenzlein got his Olympic start in the Badger State in the 1890s, Wisconsin has nurtured, trained, or schooled more than 400 Olympic athletes in a vast array of sports—from weightlifter Oscar Osthoff to gymnast Paul Hamm; from Jesse Owen’s relay-mate Ralph Metcalfe to sailor Buddy Melges; and from hockey’s Mark Johnson and Karyn Bye to speed skaters Dan Jansen, Eric Heiden, Bonnie Blair, Casey FitzRandolph, and more! In Going for Wisconsin Gold, author and sportscaster Jesse Garcia provides insights into the lives of athletes who grew up or spent time in Wisconsin on their journey to the Olympic Games. She shares some of their most captivating tales—from those that have become legend such as Dan Jansen’s heartbreaking falls and subsequent gold, to unlikely brushes with glory.

Going for Wisconsin Gold -  - <span class="date-display-single">08/02/2016 - 7:00pm</span>

24

Jun

Women Street Artists of Latin America

Lauren Gucik & Rachel Cassandra

06/24/2016 - 7:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Join the authors Lauren Gucik and Rachel Cassandra, as they share stories from their travels, read excerpts from interviews they conducted, and present portraits of women they met and their artwork.  Gucik and Cassandra will discuss artist practices, art as a tool for social change, and women’s empowerment through the lens of women making street art in Latin America. Directly following the presentation, Gucik and Cassandra will teach simple stencil making. Stenciling is a popular form of guerilla art but it is also a fun and quick way to make art for the home or on clothing. Optional: Bring a t-shirt, tote bag or a wacky item like an old toaster or broken record, and we’ll decorate them! Stencils, paper and fabric will be available for experimentation and to make take- home art. Younger participants can make stamps! 
 

Women Street Artists of Latin America -  - <span class="date-display-single">06/24/2016 - 7:00pm</span>

23

Oct

Braving It

James Campbell

10/23/2016 - 10:30am

Central Library - The Bubbler

Braving It is the story of these three journeys to Alaska, and how they change a father, his teenage daughter, and their relationship. In addition to being a profoundly personal and philosophical exploration of life’s fundamental questions, the book also addresses universal themes such as: the importance of nature as a basic human need in an increasingly disconnected and artificial world, the meaning of home, the father-daughter bond, the search for ways to live more fully, how we, as parents, can guide our adolescents with a light but steady hand, and the pain—and joy—of letting go.

Braving It -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/23/2016 - 10:30am</span>

28

Apr

Humanities Without Boundaries

Agnès B.

04/28/2016 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

Presented in partnership with the UW-Madison Center for the Humanities, the Wisconsin Book Festival is delighted to host an evening with agnès b. In 1997, she cofounded Point d’Ironie, a periodical published about six times a year, each edition designed by a different artist and circulated in a scattered fashion to museums, galleries, schools, cinemas, and other locations to be made available to anyone, free of charge. Her artistic ethic has been praised for its resistance to the exclusiveness of high fashion and its dedication to the stylistic qualities of everyday people.

Humanities Without Boundaries -  - <span class="date-display-single">04/28/2016 - 7:30pm</span>

03

Mar

L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Poetry

Bruce Andrews

03/03/2016 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

In partnership with FELIX: A Series of New Writing, the Wisconsin Book Festival presents Bruce Andrews. From 1978 to 1981, Bruce Andrews, along with poet and scholar Charles Bernstein, edited the magazine L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E, galvanizing a new and politically engaged literary avant-garde that would be known as "Language poetry." Language poets turned their attention to language itself and the politics of form. However, Andrews's work has never been limited by disciplinary boundaries. His work as a sound designer, music director, multimedia writer, literary theorist, and political scientist are all integrated into a continued interrogation of the connections between art, politics, and social life. 
 
Scholar Jerome McGann writes of Andrews's work: "order or chaos, truth or its disastrous consequences? That is the question perpetually raised by Andrews's texts." Bruce Andrews reads from his influential body of work, engaging his audience with these exciting and important questions.

L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Poetry -  - <span class="date-display-single">03/03/2016 - 7:00pm</span>

05

May

The Last Bookaneer

Matthew Pearl

05/05/2016 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

London, 1890—Pen Davenport is the most infamous bookaneer in Europe. A master of disguise, he makes his living stalking harbors, coffeehouses, and print shops for the latest manuscript to steal. But this golden age of publishing is on the verge of collapse. For a hundred years, loose copyright laws and a hungry reading public created a unique opportunity: books could easily be published abroad without an author’s permission. Authors gained fame but suffered financially—Charles Dickens, Mark Twain, Robert Louis Stevenson, to name a few—but publishers reaped enormous profits while readers bought books inexpensively. Yet on the eve of the twentieth century, a new international treaty is signed to grind this literary underground to a sharp halt. The bookaneers are on the verge of extinction.
 

The Last Bookaneer -  - <span class="date-display-single">05/05/2016 - 7:00pm</span>

21

Mar

Two If By Sea

Jacquelyn Mitchard

03/21/2016 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 302

Just hours after his wife and her entire family perish in the Christmas Eve tsunami in Brisbane, American expat and former police officer Frank Mercy goes out to join his volunteer rescue unit. While on patrol, he pulls a little boy from a submerged car, saving the child’s life with only seconds to spare. In that moment, Frank’s own life is transformed. Not quite knowing why, Frank sidesteps the law, when, instead of turning Ian over to the Red Cross, he takes the boy home to the Midwestern farm where he grew up. Not long into their journey, Frank begins to believe that Ian has an extraordinary, impossible telepathic gift, and his only wish is to protect the deeply frightened child. As Frank struggles to start over, training horses as his father and grandfather did before him, he meets Claudia, a champion equestrian and someone with whom he can share his life—and his fears for Ian.
 

Two If By Sea -  - <span class="date-display-single">03/21/2016 - 7:00pm</span>

19

Feb

People Get Ready

John Nichols Robert McChesney

02/19/2016 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

In partnership with WORT, the Wisconsin Book Festival presents Bob McChasney & John Nichols for a publication celebration of their newest book, People Get Ready.  The consequence of the technological revolution is about to hit hard: employment opportunities will collapse across the board as new technologies replace labor. Moribund capitalism and talk of market solutions won't answer this crisis. In this brave new world, the power of the people to demand a smarter and more humane economic and environmental policy will be diminished as fear trumps reason and surrender replaces hope.
 

People Get Ready -  - <span class="date-display-single">02/19/2016 - 7:00pm</span>

13

Apr

H Is For Hawk & Shaler's Fish

Helen MacDonald

04/13/2016 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

Literary phenomenon Helen MacDonald visits the Wisconsin Book Festival to celebrate the paperback release of her sensational memoir, H Is For Hawk, and her marvelous debut poetry collection, Shaler's Fish.
 
About H Is For Hawk:

H Is For Hawk & Shaler's Fish -  - <span class="date-display-single">04/13/2016 - 7:00pm</span>

12

Apr

Summerlost

Ally Condie

04/12/2016 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

Ally Condie’s debut middle grade novel SUMMERLOST is a tender and poignant exploration of family, loss, and the healing power of friendship. Last year twelve-year-old Cedar’s family was whole, and then her father and youngest brother, Ben, were killed in a devastating accident.  Life wasn’t uncomplicated before—Ben was different from most kids, and much of the family’s world revolved around accommodating his need--but now everything has changed for Cedar’s family, left broken and struggling to come to terms with their loss.
 
It’s their first summer as just three, and Cedar, her mother, and her brother Miles have moved to the small town of Iron Creek. They're just settling into their new house when a boy named Leo, dressed in costume, rides by on his bike. Intrigued, Cedar follows him to the renowned Summerlost theatre festival. Soon, she not only has a new friend in Leo and a job working concessions at the festival, she finds herself surrounded by mystery. The mystery of the tragic, too-short life of the Hollywood actress who haunts the halls of Summerlost. And the mystery of the strange gifts that keep appearing on Cedar’s windowsill.

Summerlost -  - <span class="date-display-single">04/12/2016 - 7:00pm</span>

26

Feb

Why The Right Went Wrong

EJ Dionne

02/26/2016 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

From one of our most engaging and influential political journalists, the story behind today’s headlines. In an absorbing narrative, E. J. Dionne illuminates the recent history of Republican politics from the Barry Goldwater era through the Reagan Revolution and up to the present crisis. Joining his shrewd and eye-opening look at past with contemporary reporting, he explains the unrest and discontent on the Right and the Republican Party’s bitter civil war while illustrating why a radicalized conservatism has made governing our country so difficult.
 
“The history of contemporary American conservatism is a story of disappointment and betrayal,” Dionne writes. Since the 1960s, when Barry Goldwater’s movement rejected the conservatism Dwight D. Eisenhower represented, Republican Presidents -- from Richard Nixon to Reagan and both Presidents Bush—have had to make promises they could not keep and set loose a cycle of disillusionment that pushed the GOP steadily rightward. The result is chaos in Congress and the strange contours of the GOP’s 2016 presidential race.
 

Why The Right Went Wrong  -  - <span class="date-display-single">02/26/2016 - 7:00pm</span>

17

Mar

Circling the Sun

Paula McLain

03/17/2016 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

The New York Times bestselling author of the critically acclaimed novel The Paris Wife, returns with her highly anticipated historical novel, Circling the Sun. The world is 1920s Kenya, where a glamorous and decadent circle of British expats have carved out a toe-hold of civilization at the edge of the boundless frontier. Abandoned by her mother and inspired by the dangerous beauty around her, Beryl grows into a fierce young woman driven to prove her courage and win independence at any cost. She becomes the first woman to earn her license as a professional racehorse trainer (at eighteen!); one of the very first people in Africa, and the world, to have a commercial pilot’s license; she was the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic east to west (the hard way) in 1936; and the first bush pilot to successfully scout game from the air for safari hunters under impossibly dangerous conditions.
 

Circling the Sun -  - <span class="date-display-single">03/17/2016 - 7:00pm</span>

21

Nov

Gustafer Yellowgold

Gustafer Yellowgold

11/21/2015 - 1:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

The New York Times describes Gustafer Yellowgold as "a cross between Yellow Submarine and Dr Seuss." Join us in the Central Library Community Room for this very special performance for children of all ages.

Gustafer Yellowgold -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/21/2015 - 1:30pm</span>

28

Oct

Bream Gives Me Hiccups

Jesse Eisenberg

10/28/2015 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

In his whip-smart fiction debut Bream Gives Me Hiccups, Eisenberg delivers a collection of forty-four hilarious, moving, and inventive stories that explore the various insanities of the modern world. Bream Gives Me Hiccups gets its unusual title from the set of stories that begin the book, restaurant reviews written by a nine-year-old child who is taken out for expensive meals by his newly divorced mother. The stories then move from contemporary L.A. to the dorm rooms of an American college to ancient Pompeii, throwing the reader into a universe of social misfits, reimagined scenes from history, and ridiculous overreactions. In one piece, a tense email exchange between a young man and his girlfriend is taken over by the man’s sister, who is obsessed with the Bosnian genocide (The situation reminds me of a little historical blip called the Karađorđevo agreement); in another, a college freshman forced to live with a roommate is stunned when one of her ramen packets goes missing (She didn’t have “one” of my ramens.

Bream Gives Me Hiccups -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/28/2015 - 7:30pm</span>

07

Oct

Celebrate Dyslexia Awareness Month

Children's Dyslexia Center-Madison

10/07/2015 - 5:30pm

Central Library - Children's Room

Join staff, students, and families from Madison's Children's Dyslexia Center to learn more about dyslexia and how we can support our kids, students, friends, and neighbors who struggle to read printed words. A light dinner will be served before a screening of the short documentary, The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia (2012). The evening will close with a brief panel discussion highlighting community resources. Young people ages 8 and up are especially welcome!

RSVPs to youth@madisonpubliclibrary.org  or 266-6345 are appreciated but not required.

Celebrate Dyslexia Awareness Month -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/07/2015 - 5:30pm</span>

25

Oct

Poetry and Social Justice

Ruben Medina Peggy Rogza Thomas Smith Sarah Busse Wendy Vardaman

10/25/2015 - 12:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Madison’s Poets Laureate host a reading and conversation featuring three Wisconsin writer-activist-scholars, Rubén Medina, Margaret Rozga, and Thomas R. Smith. In visionary writing that emerges from lives at the front lines of progressive social movements, Medina, Rozga and Smith explore intersections of personal and political, protest and poetry, local and global, migrations and immigrations, silence and speech. They will read from newly published books, followed by hosted conversation. What does poetry have to say in these times? How does poetry answer the political moment? What do poems add to the conversation that other language does not? Explore these and other questions together.

Poetry and Social Justice -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/25/2015 - 12:30pm</span>

25

Oct

The Unmapped Sea

Maryrose Wood

10/25/2015 - 1:30pm

Central Library - Children's Room

For fans of Lemony Snicket's Series of Unfortunate Events and Trenton Lee Stewart's Mysterious Benedict Society, here comes the fifth book in the Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place, the acclaimed and hilarious Victorian mystery series by Maryrose Wood.  
 
Lord Fredrick Ashton may not feel ready to be a father, but with a little Ashton on the way, he's sure about one thing: The wolfish curse on his family must end soon, before the child is born. Penelope willingly takes on the challenge. When Lady Constance's doctor prescribes a seaside holiday, Penelope jumps at the chance to take the three Incorrigible children to Brighton, where she hopes to persuade the old sailor Pudge to reveal what he knows about the Ashton curse.  But the Ashtons are not the only ones at the beach in January. The passionately temperamental Babushkinov family is also taking the winter waters. The Incorrigible children may have been raised by wolves, but the Babushkinov children are the wildest creatures they've ever seen. Is it more than mere coincidence that these untamed children have turned up in Brighton just as Penelope and the Incorrigibles arrive?

The Unmapped Sea -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/25/2015 - 1:30pm</span>

22

Oct

Mayakovsky's Revolver

Matthew Dickman

10/22/2015 - 4:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Presented in partnership with the UW Department of Creative Writing, a collection, from a dazzling, award-winning young poet, that paints life as a celebration in the dark.
 
At the center of Mayakovsky’s Revolver is the suicide of Matthew Dickman’s older brother. “Known for poems of universality of feeling, expressive lyricism of reflection, and heartrending allure” (Major Jackson), Dickman is a powerful poet whose new collection explores how to persevere in the wake of grief.

Mayakovsky's Revolver -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2015 - 4:00pm</span>

04

Dec

Of Beards and Men

Christopher Oldstone-Moore

12/04/2015 - 8:00pm

Central Library - Third Floor

Don’t shave those early-winter beards, Gentlemen! On Friday, December 4, 8-11pm, Wisconsin Book Festival is joining The Bubbler to celebrate the end of Movember and all things facial-hair for The Bubbler's December NIGHT LIGHT event!
 

Of Beards and Men -  - <span class="date-display-single">12/04/2015 - 8:00pm</span>

25

Oct

Future Perfect

Jen Larsen

10/25/2015 - 2:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Every year on her birthday, Ashley Perkins gets a card from her grandmother. Pretty standard, right? But like clockwork, every year, Ashley's card also contains a promise: lose enough weight, and I will buy your happiness. Ashley doesn't think there's anything wrong with the way she looks. She knows exactly how she fits into her life, wide hips and all. But no amount of arguing can persuade her grandmother that "fat" isn't a dirty word—that Ashley is happy with her life, and her body, as it is. But Ashley wasn't counting on having her dreams served up on a silver platter at her latest birthday party. She falters when Grandmother offers the one thing she's always wanted: tuition to attend Harvard University.
 

Future Perfect -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/25/2015 - 2:00pm</span>

24

Oct

Another Time and Place

Jennifer Chiaverini Mary McNear

10/24/2015 - 12:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Authors Jennifer Chiaverini and Mary McNear will read form their latest novels -- books that transport the reader to worlds with a particularly deep sense of place.  
 
About Mrs. Grant and Madame Jule: 

Another Time and Place -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 12:00pm</span>

24

Oct

Bird

Crystal Chan

10/24/2015 - 1:30pm

Central Library - Children's Room

Nothing matters. Only Bird matters. And he flew away.
 
Jewel never knew her brother Bird, but all her life she has lived in his shadow. Her parents blame Grandpa for the tragedy of their family’s past: they say that Grandpa attracted a malevolent spirit—a duppy—into their home. Grandpa hasn’t spoken a word since. Now Jewel is twelve, and she lives in a house full of secrets and impenetrable silence.  Jewel is sure that no one will ever love her like they loved Bird, until the night that she meets a mysterious boy in a tree. Grandpa is convinced that the boy is a duppy, but Jewel knows that he is something more. And that maybe—just maybe—the time has come to break through the stagnant silence of the past.  As the thick layers of silence in her family begin to unravel, Jewel needs to choose whether to stay loyal to the person her family wants her to be or to claim her own identity, no matter the cost.
 
Bird has been published in ten countries around the world and is available in audiobook in the U.S. Amandla Stenberg, who played Rue in The Hunger Games, is the narrator.

Bird -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 1:30pm</span>

23

Oct

High School Friday 2015

First Wave David Crabb Anthony Breznican

10/23/2015 - 9:00am

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

A program-rich schedule is designed to engage students in the Wisconsin Common Core Standards within a dynamic learning environment. Through meaningful interaction with authors, performers, storytellers, and peers, students become active members of the Madison community. They will gain confidence, exposure, and insight while applying skills in reading, writing, language, speaking and listening in the real world.  The focus of this year’s High School Friday is to highlight the ability of telling personal stories to change who we are and how we see the world, showcasing multiple creative avenues that can be pursued through college and career preparedness.
 
Lunch provided in partnership with Ian's Pizza.

High School Friday 2015 -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/23/2015 - 9:00am</span>

24

Oct

Secular Faith: How Culture Has Trumped Religion in American Politics

Mark Smith

10/24/2015 - 6:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

When Pope Francis recently answered “Who am I to judge?” when asked about homosexuality, he ushered in a new era for the Catholic church. A decade ago, it would have been unthinkable for a pope to express tolerance for homosexuality. Yet shifts of this kind are actually common in the history of Christian groups. Within the United States, Christian leaders have regularly revised their teachings to match the beliefs and opinions gaining support among their members and in the larger society.
 

Secular Faith: How Culture Has Trumped Religion in American Politics -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 6:00pm</span>

24

Oct

Part of Our Lives: A People's History of the American Public Library

Wayne Wiegand

10/24/2015 - 10:30am

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

Despite dire predictions in the late twentieth century that public libraries would not survive the turn of the millennium, their numbers have only increased. Two of three Americans frequent a public library at least once a year, and nearly that many are registered borrowers. Although library authorities have argued that the public library functions primarily as a civic institution necessary for maintaining democracy, generations of library patrons tell a different story.
 
In Part of Our Lives, Wayne A. Wiegand delves into the heart of why Americans love their libraries. The book traces the history of the public library, featuring records and testimonies from as early as 1850. Rather than analyzing the words of library founders and managers, Wiegand listens to the voices of everyday patrons who cherished libraries. Drawing on newspaper articles, memoirs, and biographies, Part of Our Lives paints a clear and engaging picture of Americans who value libraries not only as civic institutions, but also as social spaces for promoting and maintaining community.
 

Part of Our Lives: A People's History of the American Public Library -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 10:30am</span>

23

Oct

Seven Bad Ideas

Jeff Madrick

10/23/2015 - 5:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Presented in partnership with the Madison Institute, the author of the widely praised Age of Greed gives us a bold indictment of some of our most accepted economic theories-why they’re wrong, the harm they’ve done, and the theories that would vastly improve on them.
 
Jeff Madrick—TCF fellow, former New York Times business columnist, and now Harper’s economics columnist—amounts a comprehensive case against prevailing mainstream economic thinking, illustrating how it has damaged markets, infrastructure, and individual livelihoods, causing hundreds of billions of dollars of wasted investment; financial crisis after financial crisis; poor public education and public transportation; gross inequality of income and wealth, and stagnating wages; uncontrolled military spending; and a failed healthcare system that delivers far less than it costs.

Seven Bad Ideas -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/23/2015 - 5:30pm</span>

25

Oct

The Republic of Imagination: America in Three Books

Azar Nafisi

10/25/2015 - 11:00am

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

Ten years ago, Azar Nafisi electrified readers with her million-copy bestseller, Reading Lolita in Tehran, which told the story of how, against the backdrop of morality squads and executions, she taught The Great Gatsby and other classics to her eager students in Iran. In this exhilarating followup, Nafisi has written the book her fans have been waiting for: an impassioned, beguiling, and utterly original tribute to the vital importance of fiction in a democratic society. What Reading Lolita in Tehran was for Iran, The Republic of Imagination is for America.
 

 The Republic of Imagination: America in Three Books -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/25/2015 - 11:00am</span>

24

Oct

This Wonderful Year: The Adventures of Mr. Edward Pamprill

Mark Benno

10/24/2015 - 10:30am

Central Library - The Bubbler

Introducing Mr. Edward Pamprill, profligate son of a dissolute English Baron.  When his father arranges for his kidnapping and impressment into a British man-of-war to fight Napoleon, Mr. Pamprill is forced to leave behind fashionable London and experience the lot of the common sailor.  Young Mr. Pamprill receives his education at sea as he trades Mayfair’s drawing rooms for desperate encounters against the Spanish, raging storms, a secret mission to Naples, and a host of other adventures quite outside the realm of his previous experience.  With hand on sword and tongue firmly in cheek, the plucky hero navigates these treacherous waters with admirable aplomb.  The culture, philosophy, and political climate of the period are recounted in vivid detail.

This Wonderful Year: The Adventures of Mr. Edward Pamprill -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 10:30am</span>

25

Oct

The Little Free Library Book

Margret Aldrich

10/25/2015 - 11:00am

Central Library - The Bubbler

"Take a book. Return a book." In 2009, Todd Bol built the first Little Free Library as a memorial to his mom. Five years later, this simple idea to promote literacy and encourage community has become a global movement. Little Free Libraries—freestanding front-yard book exchanges—now number twenty-five thousand in eighty countries. 
 
The Little Free Library Book tells the history of these charming libraries, gathers quirky and poignant firsthand stories from owners, provides a resource guide for how to best use your Little Free Library, and delights readers with color images of the most creative and inspired Little Free Libraries around.

The Little Free Library Book -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/25/2015 - 11:00am</span>

25

Oct

Dreams of the Hmong Kingdom: The Quest for Legitimation in French Indochina, 1850-1960

Mai Na M. Lee

10/25/2015 - 12:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

Countering notions that Hmong history begins and ends with the “Secret War” in Laos of the 1960s and 1970s, Dreams of the Hmong Kingdom reveals how the Hmong experience of modernity is grounded in their sense of their own ancient past, when this now-stateless people had their own king and kingdom, and illuminates their political choices over the course of a century in a highly contested region of Asia.
 

Dreams of the Hmong Kingdom: The Quest for Legitimation in French Indochina, 1850-1960 -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/25/2015 - 12:30pm</span>

24

Oct

Unfair: The New Science of Criminal Injustice

Adam Benforado

10/24/2015 - 3:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

Several years ago, Adam Benforado came across a photograph—a lineup that had sent an innocent man to prison with a life sentence. As a criminal law professor who studies injustice, he’d become aware of a lot of cases like this. But this particular photograph shook him because standing just to the right of the wrongly accused man was the real perpetrator. By pure coincidence, detectives had pulled him into the lineup as a filler. The victim had looked at the person who had brutally attacked her, whom she’d been face-to-face with, and picked out the guy next to him. The police closed the case; the rapist went on to rape again; and nearly three decades passed before the truth was revealed.  
 
 

Unfair: The New Science of Criminal Injustice -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 3:00pm</span>

24

Oct

Cold War on Maplewood Street

Gayle Rosengren

10/24/2015 - 3:00pm

Central Library - Children's Room

Cold War on Maplewood Street is a novel for ages 8-12 set against the backdrop of a little known time in our past, the week-long Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962.  The main character, 12 year old Joanna, is going through a difficult adjustment even before the crisis begins.  Her adored brother Sam recently joined the Navy and is far away on a ship somewhere in the Atlantic.  With Mom working and going to night school, Joanna is alone in their basement apartment far more than she's comfortable with. She feels abandoned and vulnerable in ways she's never felt before. Then President Kennedy comes on TV with frightening news about Soviet missiles in Cuba and how the U.S.

Cold War on Maplewood Street -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 3:00pm</span>

23

Oct

Baddawi

Leila Abdelrazaq

10/23/2015 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

Baddawi is the story of a young boy named Ahmad struggling to find his place in the world. Raised in a refugee camp called Baddawi in northern Lebanon, Ahmad is just one of the many thousands of refugee children born to Palestinians who fled their homeland after the war in 1948 established the state of Israel.
 
 
Ahmad grows up in a crowded yet vibrant community amidst mounting unrest and violence in his host country, experiencing joys such as holidays and adventures with his friends, and facing heavy burdens, from a schoolyard bully to separation from his family during the Lebanese civil war. Ahmad's dogged pursuit of education and opportunity echoes the journey of the Palestinian people, as they make the best of their present circumstances while remaining steadfast in their determination to one day return to their homeland.
 
 

Baddawi -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/23/2015 - 7:30pm</span>

27

Sep

Self-Publishing Basics Workshop

09/27/2015 - 2:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

Join a panel of librarians, media specialists, and local authors to learn the basics of self-publishing – from creation to distribution of your work. These experts will share their experiences and answer questions about eBook publishing tools, copyright rules, marketing and promotion, writing tips and more.
 
 
Panel experts include: Dorothea Salo, Faculty Associate at the UW-Madison School of Library and Information Sciences; Molly Warren, Madison Public Library Collection Development Coordinator; Nate Clark, Madison Public Library Media Lab Instructor; Nichole Fromm, co-author of the new book Madison Food: A History of Capital Cuisine and co-founder of the blog Eating in Madison A to Z; Linda Abbott, author of Ten Days in Paradise, and Michelle Wildgen, author of Bread & Butter, You’re Not You, But Not For Long and Executive Editor of the literary magazine Tin House and co-founder of the Madison Writer’s Studio.
 
 
Light refreshments from Chocolaterian Café will be served.
 
 

Self-Publishing Basics Workshop -  - <span class="date-display-single">09/27/2015 - 2:00pm</span>

24

Oct

The Brewer's Tale : A History of the World According to Beer

William Bostwick

10/24/2015 - 8:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Taste 5,000 years of brewing history as a time-traveling homebrewer rediscovers and re-creates the great beers of the past.
 
The Brewer’s Tale is a beer-filled journey into the past: the story of brewers gone by and one brave writer’s quest to bring them—and their ancient, forgotten beers—back to life, one taste at a time. This is the story of the world according to beer, a toast to flavors born of necessity and place—in Belgian monasteries, rundown farmhouses, and the basement nanobrewery next door. So pull up a barstool and raise a glass to 5,000 years of fermented magic.
 

The Brewer's Tale : A History of the World According to Beer -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 8:00pm</span>

24

Oct

Music for Wartime

Rebecca Makkai

10/24/2015 - 3:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

In Music for Wartime, Makkai brings together a collection of sweeping, powerful, spellbinding stories, three of which under the “legends” section are based on her own family’s history in 1930’s Hungary. A reality show producer manipulates two contestants into falling in love, while her own relationship is falling apart. Just after the fall of the Berlin Wall, a young boy has a revelation about his father's past when a renowned Romanian violinist who survived a brutal pogrom only to be incarcerated for twenty years by the 'liberating' Communists plays a concert in their home. In an unnamed country, a composer records the folk songs of two women in a village on the brink of utter destruction. In these transporting, wide-ranging, and deeply moving stories, Rebecca Makkai brings to bear the signature mix of intelligence, imagination, and heart for which her novels are so beloved.

Music for Wartime -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 3:00pm</span>

22

Oct

What We're Writing Now

Richard Keller Caroline Levine Scott Straus

10/22/2015 - 5:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

Presented in partnership with the UW-Madison Center for the Humanities, UW-Madison faculty in the fields of Medical History and Bioethics, Political Science, and Literary Studies convene to talk about their recently released, field-shaping publications. Richard Keller, Scott Straus, and Caroline Levine will discuss their work on the Paris heat wave of 2003, nation-making in postcolonial Africa, and the patterns and arrangements that shape both art and political life.

What We're Writing Now -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2015 - 5:30pm</span>

24

Oct

Between You & Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen

Mary Norris

10/24/2015 - 12:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

Mary Norris began her professional career as a foot checker—dutifully checking patrons’ toes for athlete’s foot as they entered a Cleveland city pool—before working at a costume company and driving a milk truck. Humble beginnings for a woman who would come to spend more than three decades as a copy editor (or “prose goddess”) at The New Yorker, where she’s worked with such celebrated writers as Philip Roth, Pauline Kael, and George Saunders. Norris’s love of language, and her wish to help “all of you who want to feel better about your grammar,” led her to write Betweeen You & Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen, a hilarious, down-to-earth manual for untangling the most vexing spelling, punctuation, and usage quandaries in English. With her vivacity and singular wit, Norris clearly addresses the most ubiquitous issues in modern usage: Is it “who” or “whom”? “That” or “which”? Is it “traveler” or “traveller,” and which dictionary authority should you trust? When is it OK to use the F-word in print? Why is the semicolon considered “upper-crust”? And are we losing the apostrophe?
 

Between You & Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 12:00pm</span>

24

Oct

We Are Not Ourselves

Matthew Thomas

10/24/2015 - 6:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Born in 1941, Eileen Tumulty is raised by her Irish immigrant parents in Woodside, Queens, in an apartment where the mood swings between heartbreak and hilarity, depending on whether guests are over and how much alcohol has been consumed.
 
When Eileen meets Ed Leary, a scientist whose bearing is nothing like those of the men she grew up with, she thinks she’s found the perfect partner to deliver her to the cosmopolitan world she longs to inhabit. They marry, and Eileen quickly discovers Ed doesn’t aspire to the same, ever bigger, stakes in the American Dream.
 
Eileen encourages her husband to want more: a better job, better friends, a better house, but as years pass it becomes clear that his growing reluctance is part of a deeper psychological shift. An inescapable darkness enters their lives, and Eileen and Ed and their son Connell try desperately to hold together a semblance of the reality they have known, and to preserve, against long odds, an idea they have cherished of the future.
 

We Are Not Ourselves -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 6:00pm</span>

25

Oct

Strong Inside: Perry Wallace and the Collision of Race and Sports in the South

Andrew Maraniss

10/25/2015 - 12:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

The New York Times bestselling book Strong Inside is the untold story of Perry Wallace, who in 1966 enrolled at Vanderbilt University and became the first African-American basketball player in the Southeastern Conference. Strong Inside is not just the story of a trailblazing athlete, but of civil rights, race in America, a campus in transition during the tumultuous 1960s, the mental toll of pioneering, decades of ostracism, and eventual reconciliation and healing.
 
This fast-paced, richly detailed and meticulously researched biography digs deep beneath the surface to reveal a more complicated, illuminating and rewarding story of sports pioneering than we’ve come to expect from the genre. First-time author Andrew Maraniss masterfully unfolds the unique life story of Wallace, the rare slam-dunking basketball star who was also a valedictorian, engineering double-major, law school graduate, and university professor. Wallace’s unusually insightful and honest introspection reveals his inner thoughts throughout his journey.

Strong Inside: Perry Wallace and the Collision of Race and Sports in the South -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/25/2015 - 12:30pm</span>

23

Oct

Scrapper

Matt Bell

10/23/2015 - 7:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Detroit has descended into ruin. Kelly scavenges for scrap metal from the hundred thousand abandoned buildings in a part of the city known as “the zone,” an increasingly wild landscape where one day he finds something far more valuable than the copper he’s come to steal: a kidnapped boy, crying out for rescue. Briefly celebrated as a hero, Kelly secretly avenges the boy’s unsolved kidnapping, a task that will take him deeper into the zone and into a confrontation with his own past and long-buried traumas.
 
The second novel from the acclaimed author of In the House upon the Dirt between the Lake and the Woods, Scrapper is a devastating reimagining of one of America’s greatest cities, its beautiful architecture, its lost houses, shuttered factories, boxing gyms, and storefront churches. With precise, powerful prose, it asks: What do we owe for our crimes, even those we’ve committed to protect the people we love?
 

Scrapper -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/23/2015 - 7:30pm</span>

24

Oct

Being Nixon: A Man Divided

Evan Thomas David Maraniss

10/24/2015 - 4:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

Everyone thinks they know Richard Nixon. His “Tricky Dick,” persona has come to define his perception. Evan Thomas, former Editor at Large of Newsweek and bestselling author of Ike's Bluff and Sea of Thunder, disposes of this cartoonish version of Nixon and creates a three dimensional portrait of a complex man filled with both light and darkness in his new book, Being Nixon: A Man Divided. This wonderfully composed character study of the United States' most infamous president dispels the common myths associated with Nixon while providing an intimate and evenhanded look at him in all his strangeness (Nixon’s chief of staff H.R. Haldeman called him “the weirdest man he ever met.”) Thomas interviewed 35 Nixon aides and went through recently released tapes and archives in order to piece together this carefully composed biography. 
 

Being Nixon: A Man Divided -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 4:30pm</span>

23

Oct

Time Salvager

Wesley Chu

10/23/2015 - 5:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Convicted criminal James Griffin-Mars is no one’s hero. In his century, Earth is a toxic, abandoned world and humans have fled into the outer solar system to survive, eking out a fragile, doomed existence among the other planets and their moons. Those responsible for delaying humanity’s demise believe time travel holds the key, and they have identified James, troubled though he is, as one of a select and expendable few ideally suited for the most dangerous job in history.
 
James is a chronman, undertaking missions into Earth's past to recover resources and treasure without altering the timeline. The laws governing the use of time travel are absolute; break any one of them and, one way or another, your life is over. Most chronmen never reach old age; the stress of each jump through time, compounded by the risk to themselves and to the future, means that many chronmen rapidly reach their breaking point, and James Griffin-Mars is nearing his.
 

Time Salvager -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/23/2015 - 5:30pm</span>

24

Oct

Once in a Great City: A Detroit Story

David Maraniss

10/24/2015 - 1:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

It’s 1963 and Detroit is on top of the world. The city’s leaders are among the most visionary in America: Grandson of the first Ford; Henry Ford II; influential labor leader Walter Reuther; Motown’s founder Berry Gordy; the Reverend C.L. Franklin and his daughter, the amazing Aretha; Governor George Romney, Mormon and Civil Rights advocate; super car salesman Lee Iacocca; Mayor Jerome Cavanagh, a Kennedy acolyte; Police Commissioner George Edwards; Martin Luther King, Jr. It was the American auto makers’ best year; the revolution in music and politics was underway. Reuther’s United Auto Workers had helped lift the middle class.
 

Once in a Great City: A Detroit Story -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 1:30pm</span>

24

Oct

Kate Walden Directs: Bride of Slug Man

Julie Mata

10/24/2015 - 12:00pm

Central Library - Children's Room

Join author Julie Mata for her workshop, "Tips from Kate Walden: Four Easy Steps to Make a Movi"e. This one-hour hands-on presentation will reveal how Kate Walden makes movies. Participants will learn the basics of writing a script, pre-production (props and wardrobe), shooting - volunteers can act and handle equipment as they learn how to create different kinds of shots and the purpose of each one, and editing.
 
About Kate Walden Directs: Bride of Slug Man

Kate Walden Directs: Bride of Slug Man -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 12:00pm</span>

23

Oct

Strange Tools: Art and Human Nature

Alva Noë

10/23/2015 - 5:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

In his new book, Strange Tools: Art and Human Nature, the philosopher and cognitive scientist Alva Noë raises a number of profound questions: What is art? Why do we value art as we do? What does art reveal about our nature? Drawing on philosophy, art history, and cognitive science, and making provocative use of examples from all three of these fields, Noë offers new answers to such questions. He also shows why recent efforts to frame questions about art in terms of neuroscience and evolutionary biology alone have been and will continue to be unsuccessful.

Strange Tools: Art and Human Nature -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/23/2015 - 5:30pm</span>

24

Oct

The Limits of Truth

Matthew Gavin Frank B. J. Hollars

10/24/2015 - 4:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Nonfiction is a funny genre.  It’s the only genre defined by what it’s not.  It’s not fiction, but what is it then? How far can a writer stretch a fact before it becomes a fiction?  And what are one’s reasons for doing so?  Join nonfiction writers Matthew Gavin Frank and B.J. Hollars as they read from their newly released genre-bending books, as well as discuss their attempts and obligations to reach toward the always-nebulous limits of truth.
 

The Limits of Truth -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 4:30pm</span>

23

Oct

Bon Appétempt: A Coming-of-Age Story (With Recipes!)

Amelia Morris

10/23/2015 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

When Amelia Morris found a beautiful chocolate cake in Bon Appétit and took the recipe home to recreate it for a Christmas day brunch, it collapsed into a terrible (but delicious) mess that had to be served in an oversized bowl. It also paralleled the never-quite-predictable situations she's gotten herself into throughout her life, from her one-day career as a six-year-old lady wrestler to her ill-fated job at the School of Rock in Los Angeles. Now author of a blog named one of the best of 2012 by TIME magazine and awarded “Best Food Humor Blog” 2012 by Saveur magazine, Amelia has woven those stories into Bon Appétempt: A Coming-of-Age Story (with Recipes!) – a funny and poignant memoir about collapsing cakes and coming of age in your twenties and thirties.

Bon Appétempt: A Coming-of-Age Story (With Recipes!) -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/23/2015 - 7:30pm</span>

23

Oct

Bad Kid

David Crabb

10/23/2015 - 9:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

Filled with the music and popular culture of the late-eighties and early-nineties, this refreshingly honest and hilarious coming-of-age memoir from comedian, storyteller, and The Moth host David Crabb tells a universally resonant story about growing up gay and Goth in San Antonio, Texas. 
 

Bad Kid -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/23/2015 - 9:00pm</span>

24

Oct

Waiting

Kevin Henkes

10/24/2015 - 10:30am

Central Library - Children's Room

What are you waiting for? An owl, a puppy, a bear, a rabbit, and a pig—all toys arranged on a child's windowsill—wait for marvelous things to happen in this irresistible picture book by the New York Times–bestselling and Caldecott Medalist Kevin Henkes.
 
Five friends sit happily on a windowsill, waiting for something amazing to happen. The owl is waiting for the moon. The pig is waiting for the rain. The bear is waiting for the wind. The puppy is waiting for the snow. And the rabbit is just looking out the window because he likes to wait! What will happen? Will patience win in the end? Or someday will the friends stop waiting and do something unexpected?
 
Waiting is a big part of childhood—waiting in line, waiting to grow up, waiting for something special to happen—but in this book, a child sets the stage and pulls the strings. Timeless, beautiful, and deeply heartfelt, this picture book about imaginative play, the seasons, friendship, and surprises marks a new pinnacle in Caldecott Medalist Kevin Henkes's extraordinary career.

Waiting -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 10:30am</span>

22

Oct

The Cherry Harvest

Lucy Sanna

10/22/2015 - 5:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

The Cherry Harvest illumines the American mid-west during World War II, and the largely unknown phenomenon of German prisoners of war being used as plantation laborers, as farmers faced potentially catastrophic forfeitures due to wartime shortages of man power. 
 
In Sanna’s tale, the presence of the POWs in Door County, Wisconsin, acts as a slow simmering backdrop to stresses visited upon the Christiansen family.  Charlotte’s beloved son Ben is away fighting in the war, and she struggles to pay bills and put food on the table for herself, her husband Thomas, and their teenage daughter, Kate.
 

The Cherry Harvest -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2015 - 5:30pm</span>

22

Oct

Homemade for Sale: How to Set Up and Market a Food Business from Your Home Kitchen

Lisa Kivirist & John D. Ivanko

10/22/2015 - 7:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

From pies to preserves, wedding cakes to granola, pickles to decorated cookies, fledgling food entrepreneurs now have the freedom to earn, producing non-hazardous foods in their home kitchen. Finally, “homemade” and “fresh from the oven” on the package means exactly what it reads. Homemade for Sale provides a clear roadmap as the first authoritative guide to go from idea and recipe to final product.
 
Widely known as “cottage food legislation,” over 42 states and various Canadian provinces currently have varying forms of laws that encourage home-cooks to create and sell to the public specific, “non-hazardous” food items, often defined as those that are high-acid, like pickles, or low moisture, like breads.
 
Key topics covered in Homemade for Sale include:

• Product development and testing

• Organizing your kitchen

• Marketing and developing your niche

• Packaging and labeling

• Advertising and public relations

• Structuring your business

• Bookkeeping for your enterprise

• Managing liability, risk and government regulations

Homemade for Sale: How to Set Up and Market a Food Business from Your Home Kitchen -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2015 - 7:00pm</span>

25

Oct

Turning Inward

Blake Bailey Kate Christensen

10/25/2015 - 2:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

Blake Bailey and Kate Christensen are award-winning authors in the realms of biography and fiction.  In their newest works, they've turned their attentions on themselves and have produced incredible works of personal memoir.  With The Splendid Things We Planned and How To Cook A Moose, Bailey and Christensen bring us into their lives in intimate, touching, and important ways.  These brilliant authors will read and discuss why they were moved to write memoir after their successes in other genres.
 
About The Splendid Things We Planned:

Turning Inward -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/25/2015 - 2:00pm</span>

24

Oct

Beneath the Bonfire

Nickolas Butler

10/24/2015 - 1:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Young couples gather to participate in an annual "chainsaw party," cutting down trees for firewood in anticipation of the winter. A group of men spend a weekend hunting for mushrooms in the wilderness where they grew up and where some still find themselves trapped. An aging environmentalist takes out his frustration and anger on a singular, unsuspecting target. One woman helps another get revenge against a man whose crime extends far beyond him to an entire community. Together, the ten stories in this dazzling, surprising collection evoke a landscape that will be instantly recognizable to anyone who has traveled the back roads and blue highways of America, and they completely capture the memorable characters who call it home.

Beneath the Bonfire -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 1:30pm</span>

24

Oct

Friends of the Madison Public Library Book Sale

Friends of Madison Public Library

10/24/2015 - 9:00am

Central Library - The Friends Book Store

If you're planning on attending Wisconsin Book Festival events, swing by the Friends Book Store for a great bargains on gently used books.  Find books, DVDs, CDs and other items at low prices!  Proceeds support Madison Public Library.
 
Sale hours:
Thursday, October 22, 9 am - 8 pm
Friday, October 23, 9 am - 8 pm
Saturday, October 24, 9 am - 7:30 pm
Sunday, October 25, 1-5 pm

Friends of the Madison Public Library Book Sale  -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 9:00am</span>

22

Oct

Fortune Smiles

Adam Johnson

10/22/2015 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for his acclaimed novel The Orphan Master’s Son, Adam Johnson is one of America’s most provocative and powerful authors. Critics have compared him to Kurt Vonnegut, David Mitchell, and George Saunders, but Johnson’s new book will only further his reputation as one of our most original writers. Subtly surreal and darkly comic, Fortune Smiles is a major collection of stories that gives voice to the perspectives we don’t often hear. In six masterful stories, Johnson delves deep into love and loss, natural disasters, the influence of technology, and how the political shapes the personal. 

 

Fortune Smiles -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2015 - 7:30pm</span>

24

Oct

Hand Drawn Jokes for Smart Attractive People

Matthew Diffee

10/24/2015 - 9:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

Matthew Diffee is a star cartoonist at The New Yorker, heralded as “the de facto leader of a young generation of cartoonists” by the Wall Street Journal, and editor of the acclaimed volumes of The Rejection Collection. He often jokes that the people who “don’t get” his cartoons are universally ugly and dumb. Hand Drawn Jokes for Smart Attractive People will only appeal to those who get him—aka, those who are smart and attractive—which makes it the perfect gift! Hand Drawn Jokes for Smart Attractive People—the first solo collection of Diffee’s work—will keep readers entertained and laughing on the beach. The one-panel cartoons are sorted into types: smart, attractive religious people; smart, attractive lumberjacks; smart, attractive sports fans; smart, attractive pet owners; smart, attractive people who love (or hate) children. These ingeniously designed sequences contain Diffee’s funniest drawings and writings from the past decade as well as new cartoons and sketches (which always cater to the ridiculously handsome and brilliant, natch). 

Hand Drawn Jokes for Smart Attractive People  -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 9:00pm</span>

30

Oct

Lafayette in the Somewhat United States

Sarah Vowell

10/30/2015 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

From the bestselling author of Assassination Vacation and Unfamiliar Fishes, a humorous and insightful account of the Revolutionary War hero Marquis de Lafayette–the one Frenchman we could all agree on–and an insightful portrait of a nation’s idealism and its reality.  
 
On August 16, 1824, an elderly French gentlemen sailed into New York Harbor and giddy Americans were there to welcome him. Or, rather, to welcome him back. It had been thirty years since the Revolutionary War hero the Marquis de Lafayette had last set foot in the United States, and he was so beloved that 80,000 people showed up to cheer for him.
 

Lafayette in the Somewhat United States -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/30/2015 - 7:00pm</span>

11

Sep

Barbara the Slut and Other People

Lauren Holmes

09/11/2015 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Fearless, candid, and incredibly funny, Lauren Holmes is a newcomer who writes like a master. A literary star on the rise, her work has appeared in Guernica and Granta, where she was a 2014 New Voice. Her debut, Barbara the Slut: And Other People, is a head-turning collection of wry, intelligent, and sharply observed stories that tackle sex, family, and relationships with a deceptively light touch and a genius for revealing our most vulnerable selves.
 

Barbara the Slut and Other People -  - <span class="date-display-single">09/11/2015 - 7:00pm</span>

16

Jul

The Distance Between Us

Reyna Grande

07/16/2015 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

From an award-winning novelist and sought-after public speaker, an eye-opening memoir about life before and after illegally immigrating from Mexico to the United States.
 
Born in Mexico and raised by her grandparents after her parents left to find work in the U.S., at nine years old, Reyna enters the U.S. as an undocumented immigrant to live with her father. Filled with hope, she quickly realizes that life in America is far from perfect. Her father isn’t the man she dreamed about all those years in Mexico. His big dreams for his children are what gets them across the border, but his alcoholism and rage undermine all his hard work and good intentions. Reyna finds solace from a violent home in books and writing, inspired by the Latina voices she reads. After an explosive altercation, Reyna breaks away, going on to become the first person in her family to obtain a higher education, earning a college degree and then an M.F.A. in Creative Writing.
 

The Distance Between Us -  - <span class="date-display-single">07/16/2015 - 7:00pm</span>

24

Oct

Saving Capitalism: For the Many, Not the Few

Robert Reich

10/24/2015 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

Presented in partnership with the Middleton Action Team, the Madison Institute, and a collection of grassroots organizations, the author of Aftershock and The Work of Nations, discusses his most important book to date—a myth-shattering breakdown of how the economic system that helped make America so strong is now failing us, and what it will take to fix it.
 
Perhaps no one is better acquainted with the intersection of economics and politics than Robert B. Reich, and now he reveals how power and influence have created a new American oligarchy, a shrinking middle class, and the greatest income inequality and wealth disparity in eighty years. He makes clear how centrally problematic our veneration of the “free market” is, and how it has masked the power of moneyed interests to tilt the market to their benefit. 
 

Saving Capitalism: For the Many, Not the Few -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 7:30pm</span>

29

Jul

Summer Library Carnival

07/29/2015 - 10:30am

Central Library

Celebrate reading at this event co-sponsored by Overture Center for the Arts and Madison Public Library. Enjoy a performance by Miller and Mike at 10:30 am or 1:30 pm at the Overture Center. Then, stop by the Central Library for carnival games, literacy-rich crafts, and more!

Summer Library Carnival -  - <span class="date-display-single">07/29/2015 - 10:30am</span>

17

Aug

The End of All Things

John Scalzi

08/17/2015 - 7:00pm

Central Library

Hugo-award winning author, John Scalzi returns to his best-selling Old Man's War universe with The End of All Things, the direct sequel to 2013's The Human Division, book six of the Old Man’s War series.
 
Humans expanded into space...only to find a universe populated with multiple alien species bent on their destruction. Thus was the Colonial Union formed, to help protect us from a hostile universe. The Colonial Union used the Earth and its excess population for colonists and soldiers. It was a good arrangement...for the Colonial Union. Then the Earth said: no more.
 
Now the Colonial Union is living on borrowed time-a couple of decades at most, before the ranks of the Colonial Defense Forces are depleted and the struggling human colonies are vulnerable to the alien species who have been waiting for the first sign of weakness, to drive humanity to ruin. And there's another problem: A group, lurking in the darkness of space, playing human and alien against each other-and against their own kind -for their own unknown reasons.
 

The End of All Things -  - <span class="date-display-single">08/17/2015 - 7:00pm</span>

10

Jul

The Horror Of It All

Adam Rockoff

07/10/2015 - 8:00pm

Central Library - Third Floor

All is not right at Camp Bubbler… legend has it after the incident with a top heavy card catalog and tragic death of the Librarian all those years ago, mysterious things have started happening on the anniversary of the gruesome event each July. Campers take heed Night Light is about to go Dark…  July 10th from 8-11pm at Central Library, Join (Camp) Bubbler and the Wisconsin Book Festival for a thrilling night of horror, camp, and crafts. 
 

The Horror Of It All -  - <span class="date-display-single">07/10/2015 - 8:00pm</span>

28

May

Startupland

Mikkel Svane

05/28/2015 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Conventional wisdom says most startups need to be in Silicon Valley, started by young engineers around a sexy new idea, and backed by VC funding. But as Mikkel Svane reveals in Startupland, the story of founding Zendesk was anything but conventional.
 
Founded in a Copenhagen loft by three thirty-something friends looking to break free from corporate doldrums, Zendesk Inc. is now one of the hottest enterprise software companies, still rapidly growing with customers in 150 countries. But its success was anything but predestined. With revealing stories both funny and frank, Mikkel shares how he and his friends bravely left secure jobs to start something on their own, how he almost went broke several times, how they picked up themselves and their families to travel across the world to California and the unknown, and how the three friends were miraculously still together for Zendesk's IPO and (still growing) success.
 
Mikkel Svane will also be attending Gener8tor's Meetup and High Tech Happy Hour while in Madison on May 28.

Startupland -  - <span class="date-display-single">05/28/2015 - 7:30pm</span>

10

Jun

The Jesus Cow

Michael Perry

06/10/2015 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

For the first time, beloved Wisconsin author, Michael Perry, turns to fiction with The Jesus Cow, an affectionately skewed and big-hearted depiction of one miraculous bovine and the chaos it unleashes. “A wildly comic and deeply felt examination of faith, combining politics, scandal, farming, love, environmentalism and rural philosophy,” says Julie Schumacher, author of Dear Committee Members.

 

The uneventful world of Harley Jackson, low-key Wisconsin farmer, is about to change forever: 

 

“On Christmas Eve itself, the bachelor Harley Jackson stepped into his barn and beheld there illuminated in the straw a smallish newborn bull calf upon whose flank was borne the very image of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. “Well,” said Harley, “that’s trouble.”

 

The Jesus Cow -  - <span class="date-display-single">06/10/2015 - 7:00pm</span>

08

May

Beer for All Seasons

Randy Mosher

05/08/2015 - 5:30pm

Central Library - 3rd Floor

Celebrate Madison Craft Beer Week with the Wisconsin Book Festival and Wisconsin Brewing Company.  Best-selling beer author Randy Mosher leads you on a delicious tour of beer-tasting opportunities through the year. Organized by season, the book guides you through all the best summer fests and seasonal beer releases and helps you make the most of Craft Beer Week, Oktoberfest, and much more. It also describes the best beers to drink in each season -- the ones that are perfect for lazy summer Saturdays, barbecues with friends, traditional Thanksgiving dinners, and icy winter nights. Fun, fresh, and full of inside information, A Beer for All Seasons will be on every beer lover’s wish list.

 

This unique event includes a free tasting of seasonal beers from Wisconsin Brewing Company, as well as an author talk and book signing.

 

Beer for All Seasons -  - <span class="date-display-single">05/08/2015 - 5:30pm</span>

21

Apr

Novel Publication Celebration

Quan Barry Judith Claire Mitchell

04/21/2015 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

The Wisconsin Book Festival is proud to present an event for the publication of novels by two University of Wisconsin-Madison Creative Writing Professors.  Quan Barry's She Weeps Each Time You're Born and Judith Claire Mitchell's A Reunion of Ghosts are both magical achievements and incredible additions to the Wisconsin literary culture. 

 

About Quan Barry's She Weeps Each Time You're Born

Quan Barry’s luminous fiction debut brings us the tumultuous history of modern Vietnam as experienced by a young girl born under mysterious circumstances a few years before the country’s reunification, a child gifted with the otherworldly ability to hear the voices of the dead.  

 

Novel Publication Celebration -  - <span class="date-display-single">04/21/2015 - 7:00pm</span>

04

Jun

The Rainy Season

Maggie Messitt

06/04/2015 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Step across the border of a former, apartheid-era homeland and into a community in the midst of change, caught between a traditional past and a western future, a racially charged history and a pseudo-democratic present. THE RAINY SEASON—a work of narrative nonfiction resulting from ten months of intense immersion and six years of reporting—introduces readers to the remote bushveld community of Rooiboklaagte and opens a window into the beautifully complicated reality of daily life in South Africa.

 

The Rainy Season tells the stories of three generations in the Rainbow Nation one decade after its first democratic elections. This multi-threaded narrative follows Regina, a tapestry weaver in her sixties, standing at the crossroads where her Catholic faith and the AIDS pandemic crash; Thoko, a middle-aged sangoma (traditional healer) taking steps to turn her shebeen into a fully licensed tavern; and Dankie, a young man taking his matriculation exams, coming of age as one of Mandela's Children, the first academic class educated entirely under democratic governance.

 

The Rainy Season -  - <span class="date-display-single">06/04/2015 - 7:00pm</span>

13

Apr

Poetry Month Celebration

Joan Murray Cynthia Marie Hoffman

04/13/2015 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

The Wisconsin Book Festival celebrates National Poetry month with a joint reading by poets, Joan Murray and Cynthia Hoffman, reading from their newest works.

 

About Joan Murray's Swimming for the Ark:

Swimming for the Ark demonstrates why Joan Murray is praised as one of the leading narrative poets of our time.  This career-defining book offers twenty-two new poems along with generous selections from her previous works: The Same Water (winner of the Wesleyan New Poets Series), Looking for the Parade (winner of the National Poetry Series Open Competition), Queen of the Mist (the Niagara narrative which won her a Broadway commission), and Dancing on the Edge.This highly engaging book vividly dramatizes an urban youth and a rural life, along with deeper concerns about history, art, and injustice.

 

About Cynthia Marie Hoffman's Paper Doll Fetus

Poetry Month Celebration -  - <span class="date-display-single">04/13/2015 - 7:00pm</span>

11

Mar

What Burns Away

Melissa Falcon Field

03/11/2015 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

Melissa Falcon Field alights on the literary fiction scene with her debut novel, What Burns Away, a sizzling and compelling story about new mom Claire Spruce, whose high school sweetheart resurfaces via social media at a vulnerable time in Claire’s life. With Dean’s reappearance, Claire must approach a crossroads in her life that she wasn’t aware she’d reached.

 

What Burns Away -  - <span class="date-display-single">03/11/2015 - 7:00pm</span>

10

Feb

Regina Anderson Andrews, Harlem Renaissance Librarian

02/10/2015 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

Celebrate a slice of African American history with local author and UW-Madison School of Library and Information Studies Professor Ethelene Whitmire as she shares her biography of Regina Anderson Andrews. Regina Andrews was the first African American to head a branch of the New York Public Library. Whitmire's new biography offers the first full-length study of Andrews' activism and pioneering work with the NYPL. Want to learn more? Watch a 26-minute YouTube video overview of her research and findings.

Regina Anderson Andrews, Harlem Renaissance Librarian -  - <span class="date-display-single">02/10/2015 - 7:00pm</span>

02

Jun

Delicious!

Ruth Reichl

06/02/2015 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room

Billie Breslin has traveled far from her home in California to take a job at Delicious!, New York’s most iconic food magazine. Away from her family, particularly her older sister, Genie, Billie feels like a fish out of water—until she is welcomed by the magazine’s colorful staff. She is also seduced by the vibrant downtown food scene, especially by Fontanari’s, the famous Italian food shop where she works on weekends. Then Delicious! is abruptly shut down, but Billie agrees to stay on in the empty office, maintaining the hotline for reader complaints in order to pay her bills.
 
To Billie’s surprise, the lonely job becomes the portal to a miraculous discovery. In a hidden room in the magazine’s library, Billie finds a cache of letters written during World War II by Lulu Swan, a plucky twelve-year-old, to the legendary chef James Beard. Lulu’s letters provide Billie with a richer understanding of history, and a feeling of deep connection to the young writer whose courage in the face of hardship inspires Billie to comes to terms with her fears, her big sister and her ability to open her heart to love.

Delicious! -  - <span class="date-display-single">06/02/2015 - 7:30pm</span>

06

Feb

The Owls Are Not What They Seem

Brad Dukes

02/06/2015 - 8:00pm

Central Library - Third Floor

The Wisconsin Book Festival and The Bubbler present this Twin Peaks themed Night LIght event with Brad Dukes, author of Reflections: An Oral History of Twin Peaks.  Reflections examines David Lynch and Mark Frost's legendary television series that aired on the ABC network from 1990-91. As the mystery of "Who Killed Laura Palmer?" played out on television sets across the world, another compelling drama was unfolding in the everyday lives of the show's cast and crew.  Twenty-five years later, Reflections goes behind the curtain of Twin Peaks and documents the series unlikely beginnings, widespread success, and peculiar collapse. Featuring first-hand accounts from series cocreator Mark Frost and cast members including Kyle MacLachlan, Joan Chen, Sherilyn Fenn, Piper Laurie, Michael Ontkean, Ray Wise, Billy Zane, and many more - Reflections explores the magic and mystique of a true television phenomenon, Twin Peaks.

 

Come dressed as your favorite Twin Peaks character for a night filled with music, coffee, pie, and donuts.  Doors open at 8.  The conversation with Brad about Reflections begins at 9.

The Owls Are Not What They Seem -  - <span class="date-display-single">02/06/2015 - 8:00pm</span>

29

Nov

The Slow Regard of Silent Things

Patrick Rothfuss

11/29/2014 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

In partnership with A Room of One's Own Bookstore, the Wisconsin Book Festival presents Patrick Rothfuss for The Slow Regard of Silent Things.  Deep below the University, there is a dark place. Few people know of it: a broken web of ancient passageways and abandoned rooms. A young woman lives there, tucked among the sprawling tunnels of the Underthing, snug in the heart of this forgotten place.  Her name is Auri, and she is full of mysteries.  

 

The Slow Regard of Silent Things is a brief, bittersweet glimpse of Auri’s life, a small adventure all her own. At once joyous and haunting, this story offers a chance to see the world through Auri’s eyes. And it gives the reader a chance to learn things that only Auri knows....

 

In this book, Patrick Rothfuss brings us into the world of one of The Kingkiller Chronicle’s most enigmatic characters. Full of secrets and mysteries, The Slow Regard of Silent Things is the story of a broken girl trying to live in a broken world.

The Slow Regard of Silent Things -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/29/2014 - 7:00pm</span>

01

Nov

2014 Madison Print & Resist

11/01/2014 - 11:00am

Central Library - Third Floor

Madison Print & Resist is a one-day show of printed matter, including posters, stickers, zines, journals, and books. The roster of exhibitors is drawn from the world of experimental publishers, visual artists, artisanal bookmakers and printers, radical imprints, grassroots zine authors, and activist designers. The exhibitors hail from across Wisconsin and from around the United States. They include an array of subversively creative print media artists and publishers.  For a full list of exhibitors, visit the Madison Print & Resist website.

2014 Madison Print & Resist -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/01/2014 - 11:00am</span>

18

Nov

Committee of One

Patricia Holt

11/18/2014 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

The Wisconsin Book Festival, in partnership with the Madison-Rafah Sister City Project presents Patricia Holt to discuss her book, Committee of One.

Committee of One -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/18/2014 - 7:00pm</span>

20

Nov

Edges

Leora Skolkin-Smith

11/20/2014 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

As the death toll mounts in the Gaza Strip, the world is again focused on a conflict reinforced by the border between Israel and Palestine. That border and its toll on Jerusalem, the city where her mother was born, haunted Leora Skolkin-Smith throughout her childhood. Decades later, she drew on memories of her mother and their visits to her homeland to create a richly atmospheric, deeply personal novel. “The first scenes I came up with were just about sitting around a dinner table in Jerusalem as a child,” Leora recalls. “They made the people I loved laugh but also feel an intimacy with a place so terrifying.” That novel, Edges: O Israel, O Palestine, was published by Glad Day Books in 2005 and nominated for a PEN/Faulkner Award by its first and most influential champion—the late, great Grace Paley, writer, poet, teacher, and social activist.

 

Edges -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/20/2014 - 7:00pm</span>

17

Oct

High School Friday 2014

First Wave Jordan Ellenberg

10/17/2014 - 9:00am

Central Library

A program-rich schedule is designed to engage students in the Wisconsin Common Core Standards within a dynamic learning environment. Through meaningful interaction with authors, poets, and peers, students will see themselves as active members of the Madison community. They will gain confidence, exposure, and insight while applying skills in reading, writing, language, speaking and listening in the real world.  The focus of this year’s High School Friday is to highlight the varied nature of work, showcasing multiple creative avenues that can be pursued through college and career preparedness.

High School Friday 2014 -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/17/2014 - 9:00am</span>

16

Oct

Elementary School Thursday

Gustafer Yellowgold Susan Apps-Bodilly Julie Mata

10/16/2014 - 9:00am

Central Library

Elementary School Thursday has been postponed.  We will reschedule this event for later in the year.

 

This year, the Wisconsin Book Festival is expanding its school-age programming to include Elementary School Thursday. This event is the first event dedicated to author programming for the elementary age group.  We are planning programming for grade-school students that combines performance, author programming, and workshops. In the same way that High School Friday has successfully created a venue and opportunity for older teens to interact at and with the festival, “Elementary School Thursday” will generate new programs and attractions for both authors and students to enjoy the festival events.  Pre-registration by middle grade school groups is required.  Events at this year's Elementary School Thursday will include:

 

A performance by Gustafer Yellowgold: (45 min)

 

Elementary School Thursday -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/16/2014 - 9:00am</span>

19

Oct

2014 Friends of the Madison Public Library Book Sale

Friends of Madison Public Library

10/19/2014 - 1:00pm

Central Library - Friends Book Store

As part of the Wisconsin Book Festival, the Friends of the Madison Public Library will be hosting a book sale at our Book Store on the first floor of the Central Library! Stop by for some great deals on used books and other materials!
 

  • Thursday, October 16, 9-7
  • Friday, October 17, 9-6
  • Saturday, October 18, 9-5
  • Sunday, October 19, 1-5

All proceeds will support the Friends of the Madison Public Library's efforts to provide volunteer support and recognition, advocacy, and supplemental funds for special projects and collections that the Library could otherwise not afford.

2014 Friends of the Madison Public Library Book Sale -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2014 - 1:00pm</span>

18

Oct

Wisconsin Book Festival Arts Reception

Andy Adams Laura Damon-Moore Filter Photo Festival

10/18/2014 - 6:30pm

Central Library - Third Floor

Spend the early evening on the third floor of Central Library celebrating photography, art, and library programs, including:

Wisconsin Book Festival Arts Reception -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 6:30pm</span>

19

Oct

The FlakPhoto Booklist

Andy Adams

10/19/2014 - 9:00am

Central Library - 2nd Floor

We've teamed up with FlakPhoto creator Andy Adams to feature a selection of photography books drawn from the Madison Public Library collection. The FlakPhoto Booklist installation is on view September 26 - October 30 on the 2nd floor of the Central Library.

The FlakPhoto Booklist  -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2014 - 9:00am</span>

16

Oct

Devil's Lake Reading

Danielle Evans Rebecca Dunham

10/16/2014 - 6:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Devil’s Lake, an online literary journal out of UW-Madison’s MFA program, publishes necessary work—poems, stories, and essays that speak to the human issues of our contemporary moment. This year, we proudly present Wisconsin-based writers Rebecca Dunham and Danielle Evans.  Dunham and Evans are the 2014 Devil’s Lake Driftless Prize judges, and they will read from their poetry and fiction.  

 

About Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self:

Devil's Lake Reading -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/16/2014 - 6:30pm</span>

19

Oct

PhotoBook Exhibition

Filter Photo Festival

10/19/2014 - 9:00am

Central Library - Madison Room & Art Gallery

In recognition of the increasing importance of the photo book, Filter Photo held its first ever photo book call for entries and juror Gregory Harris, Assistant Curator of the DePaul Art Museum, selected 29 well-thought-out, original, and compelling books for the exhibition. The selected entries comprise a survey of the contemporary photo book, with diverse styles of design, publication, aesthetic, and country of origin represented. The exhibition is a partnership between the Filter Photo,  FlakPhoto, the Wisconsin Book Festival,  and The BUBBLER @ Madison Public Library and will run October 13th – October 27th. Please join us for a reception on Saturday, October 18th from 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm at the Madison Public Library.

PhotoBook Exhibition -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2014 - 9:00am</span>

24

Oct

Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End

Atul Gawande

10/24/2014 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

In Being Mortal, bestselling author Atul Gawande tackles the hardest challenge of his profession: how medicine can not only improve life but also the process of its ending.

 

Medicine has triumphed in modern times, transforming birth, injury, and infectious disease from harrowing to manageable. But in the inevitable condition of aging and death, the goals of medicine seem too frequently to run counter to the interest of the human spirit. Nursing homes, preoccupied with safety, pin patients into railed beds and wheelchairs. Hospitals isolate the dying, checking for vital signs long after the goals of cure have become moot. Doctors, committed to extending life, continue to carry out devastating procedures that in the end extend suffering.

 

Gawande, a practicing surgeon, addresses his profession’s ultimate limitation, arguing that quality of life is the desired goal for patients and families. Gawande offers examples of freer, more socially fulfilling models for assisting the infirm and dependent elderly, and he explores the varieties of hospice care to demonstrate that a person's last weeks or months may be rich and dignified.

 

Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2014 - 7:00pm</span>

18

Oct

A Christmas Wish for Corduroy

B. G. Hennessy

10/18/2014 - 11:00am

Central Library - Children's Program Room

It’s almost Christmas and Corduroy wishes he could be a child’s holiday gift—but he’s a plain bear, and nobody seems to notice him. He sets out across the store to ask Santa Claus for help, but he can’t visit without wearing a special outfit! After stopping to try on hats, boots, and even baby clothes, Corduroy finally arrives at the North Pole. Can Santa help Corduroy find a new home in time for Christmas?

 

With warm humor and classic art, A Christmas Wish for Corduroy takes readers back to the beginning and shows how Corduroy became the beloved bear we know today. This is a heartwarming story about the power of hope, perseverance, and friendship--an important addition to any Corduroy collection.

A Christmas Wish for Corduroy -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 11:00am</span>

21

Aug

Read-a-Romance Month Book Discussions

08/21/2014 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Madison Room

August is Read-A-Romance Month and the Central Library is getting in on the fun. On Thursday evenings in the month of August we'll be talking about romance novels. Each week we're covering a different sub-genre. 

  • August 7th: One Foot on the Floor - Gentle Romance  
  • August 14th: Things That Go Bump in the Night - Urban Fantasy Romance
  • August 21st: Hot & Now - Contemporary Romance
  • August 28th: Drama Queens - Young Adult Romance

You don't have to read a specific title. Just read any book for each category and come and tell us and your fellow romance readers about it. We'll have treats and other surprises. Join us for one or all of the nights. And come prepared to tell us about your latest reads.

Visit the Read-A-Romance Month website where 93 writers explore the theme "Celebrate Romance" throughout the month.

Read-a-Romance Month Book Discussions -  - <span class="date-display-single">08/21/2014 - 7:00pm</span>

18

Oct

101 Two-Letter Words

Stephin Merritt

10/18/2014 - 9:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

From Stephin Merritt of The Magnetic Fields comes this unique, witty book - a celebration of two-letter words, focusing on the 101 such words that count in Scrabble. Featuring original four-line poems by Merritt and color illustrations by Roz Chast, 101 Two-letter Words covers familiar words (go, hi, no, ox) as well as obscure ones (ka, oe, qi, xu).  With the dark wit and clever wordplay of Edward Gorey and Shel Silverstein, this book is sure to delight not just Scrabble players and crossword puzzle fanatics but anyone in thrall to the weirdest corners of the English language.

101 Two-Letter Words -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 9:00pm</span>

18

Oct

The Sleeve Waves

Angela Sorby

10/18/2014 - 12:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Inspired by thrift store knit sleeves, punk rock record sleeves, and, of course, print book sleeves, Angela Sorby explores how the concrete world hails us in waves of color and sound. She asks implicitly, “What makes the sleeve wave? Is it the body or some force larger than the self?” As Sorby’s tough, ironic, and subtly political voice repeatedly insists, we apprehend, use, and release more energy than we can possibly control. This collection includes two main parts—one visual, one aural—flanking a central pastoral poem sung by Virgilian sheep. Meant to be read both silently and aloud, the poems in The Sleeve Waves meditate on how almost everything—like light and sound—comes to us in waves that break and vanish and yet continue.

The Sleeve Waves -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 12:00pm</span>

18

Oct

Further Joy

John Brandon

10/18/2014 - 2:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

In eleven expertly crafted stories, John Brandon gives us a stunning assortment of men and women at the edge of possibility—gamblers and psychics, wanderers and priests, all of them on the verge of finding out what they can get away with, and what they can’t. Ranging from haunted deserts to alligator-filled swamps, these are stories of foul luck and strange visitations, delivered with deadpan humor by an unforgettable voice.

 

The New York Times praised Brandon’s last novel for a style that combined Elmore Leonard and Charles Portis, and now Brandon brings that same darkly American artistry to his very first story collection, demonstrating once again that he belongs in the top ranks of contemporary writers.

Further Joy -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 2:30pm</span>

18

Oct

Painted Cities

Alexai Galaviz-Budziszewski

10/18/2014 - 1:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

To those outside it, Pilsen is a vast barrio on the south side of Chicago. To Alexai Galaviz-Budziszewski, it is a world of violence and decay and beauty, of nuance and pure chance. It is a place where the smell of cooking frijoles is washed away by that of dead fish in the river, where vendettas are a daily routine, and where a fourteen-year-old immigrant might hold the ability bring people back from the dead.

 

Simultaneously tough and tender, these stories mark the debut of a writer poised to represent his city's literature for decades to come.

Painted Cities -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 1:30pm</span>

18

Oct

Eyes Wide Open

Paul Fleischman

10/18/2014 - 10:00am

Central Library - Community Room

Eyes Wide Open: Going Behind the Environmental Headlines is the briefing every high school reader needs to comprehend our riveting historical moment.  Using history, sociology, and psychology for altitude, the book points out the principles driving events, showing readers how to see the global in the local. 

Eyes Wide Open -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 10:00am</span>

19

Oct

It's an Orange Aardvark

Michael Hall

10/19/2014 - 1:00pm

Central Library - Children's

Five carpenter ants at home in their tree stump hear a noise. What is it? One ant thinks it is a hungry aardvark lurking outside the stump, just waiting to eat them. One ant makes a hole in the stump to see. Orange light floods the stump—it’s not an aardvark, proclaims the ant chorus. It’s orange! So what is lurking outside the stump? This very funny picture book features die-cut holes on almost every page, suspenseful page turns, a wonderful surprise ending, and an introduction to a rainbow of colors.

It's an Orange Aardvark -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2014 - 1:00pm</span>

18

Oct

Feminism Unfinished: A Short, Surprising History of American Women's Movements

Linda Gordon Astrid Henry

10/18/2014 - 3:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

In partnership with the UW-Madison Center for the Humanities, the Wisconsin Book Festival presents Linda Gordon and Astrid Henry. The American women’s movement has been shrouded in myths, argue three leading scholars in this bold and revisionist history.

 

Feminism Unfinished: A Short, Surprising History of American Women's Movements -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 3:00pm</span>

19

Oct

The Great Sand Fracas of Ames County

Jerry Apps

10/19/2014 - 12:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

When the Alstage Mining Company proposes a frac sand mine in the small Ames County village of Link Lake, events quickly escalate to a crisis. Business leader Marilyn Jones of the Link Lake Economic Development Council heads the promine forces, citing needed jobs and income for the county. Octogenarian Emily Higgins and other Link Lake Historical Society members are aghast at the proposed mine location in the community park, where a huge and ancient bur oak—the historic Trail Marker Oak—has stood since it pointed the way along an old Menominee trail. Reluctantly caught in the middle of the fray is Ambrose Adler, a reclusive, retired farmer with a secret.

 

Soon the fracas over frac sand attracts some national attention, including that of Stony Field, the pen name of a nationally syndicated columnist. Will the village board vote to solve their budget problems with a cut of the mining profits? Will the mine create real jobs for local folks? Will Stony Field come to the village to lead protests against the mine? And will defenders of the Trail Marker Oak literally draw a battle line in the sand?

The Great Sand Fracas of Ames County -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2014 - 12:30pm</span>

18

Oct

The Innovative State: How New Technologies Can Transform Government

Aneesh Chopra

10/18/2014 - 1:30pm

Central Library - Community Room

In Innovative State, America's first Chief Technology Officer, Aneesh Chopra, tells the story of a new revolution in America. Over the course of our history, America has had a pioneering government matched to the challenges of the day. But over the past twenty years, as our economy and our society have been completely changed by technology, and the private sector has innovated, government has stalled, trapped in models that were designed for the America of the past. Aneesh Chopra, tasked with leading the charge for a more open, tech-savvy government, here shows how we can reshape our government and tackle our most vexing problems, from economic development to affordable healthcare. Drawing on interviews with leaders and building on his firsthand experience, Chopra's Innovative State is a fascinating look at how to be smart, do more with less, and reshape American government for the twenty-first century.

 

This event is being held in partnership with the Wisconsin Science Festival.

The Innovative State: How New Technologies Can Transform Government -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 1:30pm</span>

16

Oct

How Not to Be Wrong

Jordan Ellenberg

10/16/2014 - 5:30pm

Central Library - Community Room

In partnership with the UW-Madison Center for the Humanities, the Wisconsin Book Festival presents Jordan Ellenberg.  The math we learn in school can seem like a dull set of rules, laid down by the ancients and not to be questioned. In How Not to Be Wrong, Jordan Ellenberg shows us how wrong this view is: Math touches everything we do, allowing us to see the hidden structures beneath the messy and chaotic surface of our daily lives. It’s a science of not being wrong, worked out through centuries of hard work and argument.

 

How Not to Be Wrong -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/16/2014 - 5:30pm</span>

18

Oct

How to Sell Your Novel

Chloe Benjamin Ashley Ream Judith Claire Mitchell

10/18/2014 - 3:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Madison authors Chloe Benjamin (The Anatomy of Dreams), Judith Claire Mitchell (author of The Last Day of the War and the forthcoming A Reunion of Ghosts), and Ashley Ream (Losing Clementine), discuss the path to publication, from drafting to securing an agent, submitting to publishers, and revising with an editor. The panel will also include brief readings by each author and a Q&A."

 

 

Chloe Benjamin's The Anatomy of Dreams:

How to Sell Your Novel -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 3:30pm</span>

18

Oct

Vintage

Susan Gloss

10/18/2014 - 10:30am

Central Library - The Bubbler

At Hourglass Vintage in Madison, Wisconsin, every item in the boutique has a story to tell . . . and so do the women whose lives the store touches.

 

A small-town girl with a flair for fashion, Violet Turner had always dreamed of owning a shop like Hourglass Vintage. But while she values the personal history behind each beautiful item she sells, Violet is running from her own past. Faced with the possibility of losing the store to an unscrupulous developer, she realizes that despite her usual self-reliance she cannot save it alone.

 

Eighteen-year-old April Morgan is nearly five months along in an unplanned pregnancy when her hasty engagement is broken. When she returns the perfect vintage wedding dress to Violet's shop, she discovers a world of new possibilities, and an unexpected sisterhood with women who won't let her give up on her dreams.

 

Vintage -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 10:30am</span>

18

Oct

Sisterland and the Madison Writers' Studio Conversation

Curtis Sittenfeld Susanna Daniel Michelle Wildgen Mary Kay Zuravleff

10/18/2014 - 11:30am

Central Library - Community Room

SISTERLAND tells the story of twins, Kate and Violet, who grow up extremely close—sharing a room, weathering the eccentricities of their parents, and delighting in the music and movies of their 1980s childhood. But in junior high, Kate makes a fateful decision that drives the sisters apart. Years later, Vi is living on the fringes of society while Kate, a devoted wife and mother, is doing everything she can to fit into suburban life. After a chance occurrence in the middle of the night, the sisters find themselves drawn together once again, forced to face the secrets of the past. As the sense of order Kate has worked so hard to create in her adult life begins to falter, it’s not clear whether Vi, the one person who knows her best, will save Kate—or be her undoing. Funny, haunting, and written with deep empathy and wisdom, SISTERLAND is a novel about the obligation we have towards others and the responsibility we take for our own actions.

 

Sisterland and the Madison Writers' Studio Conversation -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 11:30am</span>

19

Oct

Perimeter: A Contemporary Portrait of Lake Michigan

Kevin Miyazaki

10/19/2014 - 9:30am

Central Library - Community Room

Commissioned by the Haggerty Museum of Art at Marquette University to create an artwork reflecting on the importance of freshwater, Milwaukee-based photographer Kevin J. Miyazaki embarked on a two-week, 1,800-mile drive around Lake Michigan. He traveled its perimeter, through Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan, to produce what he calls "a contemporary portrait of Lake Michigan." Miyazaki set up his portable studio on beaches, in parks, on boat docks, and in backyards, photographing those he met along the way. From residents, environmental scientists, and artists to a Native American water rights advocate, surfers, and commercial fishermen, Lake Michigan holds a powerful place in the life of each. Many shared their thoughts with him on why this body of water is important to all. Miyazaki also photographed the water as he went, creating waterscapes of the ever-changing lake affected by weather and time. Perimeter gathers these images together, creating a diverse portrait of both people and a place, encapsulating Lake Michigan's significance to those who are drawn to it.

 Perimeter: A Contemporary Portrait of Lake Michigan -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2014 - 9:30am</span>

17

Oct

A Good Year

Andrea Potos Evie Robillard Katrin Talbot Rosemary Zurlo-Cuva

10/17/2014 - 5:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Andrea Potos, Evie Robillard, Katrin Talbot, and Rosemary Zurlo-Cuva are Madison poets whose widely different styles and sensibilities have not kept them from nurturing each other's work in a poetry group every other week for more than a decade. This year, all four have new chapbooks to celebrate. Potos will read from New Girl (Anchor & Plume Press); Robillard from The Willowslip (Finishing Line Press); Talbot from noun'd, verb (dancing girl press); and Zurlo-Cuva from The Beauty of This World (Parallel Press).

A Good Year -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/17/2014 - 5:00pm</span>

19

Oct

The Dog Year

Ann Garvin

10/19/2014 - 12:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Dr. Lucy Peterman was not built for a messy life. A well-respected surgeon whose patients rely on her warmth, compassion and fierce support, Lucy has always worked hard and trusted in the system. She’s not the sort of person who ends up in a Twelve-Step program after being caught stealing supplies from her hospital.

 

But that was Lucy before the accident -- before her husband and unborn baby were ripped away from her in an instant, before her future felt like a broken promise.  Caught red-handed in a senseless act that kept her demons atbay, she's faced with a choice: get some help, or lose her medical license.

 

Now, she’s reluctantly sharing her deepest fears with a bunch of strangers, avoiding her loneliness by befriending a troubled girl, pinning her hopes on her husband’s last gift, and getting involved with a rugged cop from her past. It’s only when she is adopted by a stray mutt and moves her group to the dog park that she begins to truly bond with the rag-tag dog-loving addicts—and discovers that a chaotic, unplanned life might be the sweetest of all.

The Dog Year -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2014 - 12:30pm</span>

18

Oct

Man Alive!

Mary Kay Zuravleff

10/18/2014 - 4:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

All it takes is a quarter to change Owen Lerner’s life. When lightning strikes the coin he’s feeding into the parking meter, the pediatric psychiatrist survives, except that now he only wants to barbecue. The bolt of lightning that lifts Dr. Lerner into the air sends the entire Lerner clan into free fall, and Man Alive! follows along at that speed, capturing family-on-family pain with devastating humor and a rare generosity. This novel explores how much we are each allowed to change within a family—and without. 

Man Alive! -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 4:30pm</span>

17

Oct

Missing Class: How Seeing Class Cultures Can Strengthen Social Movement Groups

Betsy Leondar-Wright

10/17/2014 - 5:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Many activists worry about the same few problems in their groups: low turnout, inactive members, conflicting views on racism, overtalking, and offensive violations of group norms. But in searching for solutions to these predictable and intractable troubles, progressive social movement groups overlook class culture differences. In Missing Class, Betsy Leondar-Wright uses a class-focused lens to show that members with different class life experiences tend to approach these problems differently. This perspective enables readers to envision new solutions that draw on the strengths of all class cultures to form the basis of stronger cross-class and multiracial movements.

 

Missing Class: How Seeing Class Cultures Can Strengthen Social Movement Groups -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/17/2014 - 5:30pm</span>

17

Oct

Daring: My Passages

Gail Sheehy

10/17/2014 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room

The author of the classic New York Times bestseller Passages returns with her inspiring memoir—a chronicle of her trials and triumphs as a groundbreaking “girl” journalist in the 1960s, to iconic guide for women and men seeking to have it all, to one of the premier political profilers of modern times.

 

Candid, insightful, and powerful, Daring: My Passages is the story of the unconventional life of a writer who dared . . . to walk New York City streets with hookers and pimps to expose violent prostitution; to march with civil rights protesters in Northern Ireland as British paratroopers opened fire; to seek out Egypt’s president Anwar Sadat when he was targeted for death after making peace with Israel.

 

Daring: My Passages -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/17/2014 - 7:30pm</span>

18

Oct

2014 South Asia Book Award for Children's and Young Adult Literature Ceremony

Elizabeth Suneby Jennifer Bradbury Farhana Zia

10/18/2014 - 3:00pm

Central Library - Children's Program Room

Please join us for the 2014 South Asia Book Award Ceremony honoring Elizabeth Suneby, author of Razia's Ray of Hope: One Girl's Dream of an Education, with the 2014 SABA Award Book for Children, Jennifer Bradbury, author of A Moment Comes, with the 2014 SABA Award Book for Young Adults, and Farhana Zia, author of The Garden of My Imaan, with the 2014 SABA Honor.

 

After remarks from committee members and presentations by Ms. Suneby, Ms. Bradbury, and Ms. Zia, the event will close with a book signing. Award books will be on sale at the event. In recent years an increasing number of high-quality children's and young adult fiction books have appeared that portray South Asia or South Asians living abroad. To encourage and commend authors and publishers who produce such books, and to provide teachers with recommendations for classroom use, since 2011 the South Asia National Outreach Consortium (SANOC) has offered up to two outstanding works of literature, from early childhood to secondary reading levels, which accurately and skillfully portrays South Asia or South Asians in the diasporas.

 

2014 South Asia Book Award for Children's and Young Adult Literature Ceremony     -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 3:00pm</span>

18

Oct

The Liar's Wife

Mary Gordon

10/18/2014 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room

The beloved author at her storytelling best: four wonderful novellas of Americans abroad and Europeans in America.

 

In these absorbing and exquisitely made novellas of relationships at home and abroad, both historical and contemporary, we meet the ferocious Simone Weil during her final days as a transplant to New York City; a vulnerable American grad student who escapes to Italy after her first, compromising love affair; the charming Irish liar of the title novella, who gets more out of life than most of us; and Thomas Mann, opening the heart of a high-school kid in America. These stories dazzle on the surface, with beautifully rendered settings and vistas, and dig deep psychologically. At every turn Gordon reveals in her characters' interactions those crucial flashes of understanding that change lives forever. So richly developed it is hard to believe they tales fit into novella-sized packages, these tales carry us away both as individual stories and as a larger, book-length experience of Gordon's mastery and human sympathy.

The Liar's Wife -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 7:30pm</span>

24

Sep

Take It Off the Shelf!

Forward Theater Company

09/24/2014 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

Celebrate Banned Books Week (September 21-27) at the Central Library with the kickoff event of an eight performance run of Forward Theatre’s Take It Off the Shelf!  This event will feature Forward Theatre actors performing monologues reflecting on banned books throughout the ages from various points of view.  The first performance will occur at the Central Library on September 24 at 7 pm.  Take It Off the Shelf! is funded by a grant from Beyond the Page, a joint effort of the Dane County Library Service and the Madison Community Foundation to create a permanent endowment that will support humanities programming in Dane County libraries.   This series compliments Forward Theater’s Out of the Fire: The Banned Books Monologue Festival on February 26-28, 2015.

 

For more information, more performances, and other similar events in Dane County libraries, see beyondthepage.info  For more about Out of the Fire, see www.forwardtheater.com

Take It Off the Shelf! -  - <span class="date-display-single">09/24/2014 - 7:00pm</span>

16

Oct

Barracuda in the Attic

Kipp Friedman

10/16/2014 - 5:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Whether shooting pool with the mobster Crazy Joey Gallo, attending a dinner party hosted by an aged but remarkably spry Groucho Marx, or simply playing doctor with a classmate in the former estate of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Kipp Friedman led a colorful childhood. The youngest son of celebrated writer and satirist Bruce Jay Friedman, Kipp looks back fondly on the amusing and sometimes confusing events and encounters that helped shape his early life in this moving tribute to growing up among a family of creative artists swept up in the whirlwind of the New York arts scene of the 1960s and 70s.

 

Barracuda in the Attic -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/16/2014 - 5:00pm</span>

17

Oct

Underground: New and Selected Poems

Jim Moore

10/17/2014 - 7:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Underground: New and Selected Poems is the long overdue career retrospective of Jim Moore, a poet of great depth and generosity who has steadily been building a devoted following over the course of three decades and seven books. This definitive volume gathers the best of his previous work as well as twenty new poems that showcase a poet whose work should appeal to fans of Mary Oliver and Billy Collins. In poems that are frank and accessible, Moore is a generous and keen observer of the world and people around him, one who, like the best of friends, is not afraid to risk sentimentality to get at deeper emotional truths that lie beneath the surface of daily life.

Underground: New and Selected Poems -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/17/2014 - 7:00pm</span>

19

Oct

The Scavengers

Michael Perry

10/19/2014 - 11:00am

Central Library - Community Room

Life outside the Bubble Cities is rough. Electricity is history. The weather can change at a moment's notice. And the world is short on food but full of trouble.

 

After her family chose to take their chances OutBubble, Maggie decided it was time to grow up and grow tough. Rechristening herself Ford Falcon, she spends her days scavenging in a junkyard near her family's makeshift house, fending off the occasional solar bear attack and keeping her eyes peeled for any GreyDevils that might be lurking around the corner.

 

Although times are tough, Ford, her parents, and her little brother, Dookie, have been making do. But when Ford comes home from a bartering trip to find the place ransacked and her family missing, she must prove she is brave enough to make it in this wild world alone and face whatever obstacles stand in the way of rescuing her loved ones.

The Scavengers -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2014 - 11:00am</span>

17

Oct

Snow in May

Kseniya Melnik

10/17/2014 - 5:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

A remote Siberian town with a darkly fascinating history teems with life in this luminous linked debut collection of short stories.

 

Kseniya Melnik's Snow in May introduces a cast of characters bound by their relationship to the port town of Magadan in Russia's Far East, a former gateway for prisoners assigned to Stalin’s forced-labor camps. Comprised of a surprising mix of newly minted professionals, ex-prisoners, intellectuals, musicians, and faithful Party workers, the community is vibrant and resilient and life in Magadan thrives even under the cover of near-perpetual snow. By blending history and fable, each of Melnik's stories transports us somewhere completely new: a married Magadan woman considers a proposition from an Italian footballer in '70s Moscow; an ailing young girl visits a witch doctor’s house where nothing is as it seems; a middle-aged dance teacher is entranced by a new student’s raw talent; a former Soviet boss tells his granddaughter the story of a thorny friendship; and a woman in 1958 jumps into a marriage with an army officer far too soon.

 

Snow in May -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/17/2014 - 5:30pm</span>

17

Oct

Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory

Caitlin Doughty

10/17/2014 - 9:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

Death. The universal equalizer. It doesn’t care how smart, attractive, wealthy, loved, or well-liked you are. To death, it doesn’t matter, he’ll take us all. From the moment of birth, we begin dying and no one knows when, where, or how. We’re all future corpses, and after cremation, we’re all four to seven pounds of greyish ash and bone.

 

In Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory, Caitlin Doughty reveals life’s terrifying secret—we all die. It’s not thought about or spoken of. We systematically deny it until it happens, and when it does, the industry shrouds the preparations, perpetuating more fear. By keeping it hidden, however, the funeral industry isn’t cheating us out of dollars, but death itself. There is no law or religious reason that requires embalming, yet it is a billion-dollar industry in North America.

 

Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/17/2014 - 9:00pm</span>

18

Oct

House of Coates Revisited: Lester B. Morrison, Little Brown Mushroom, and Other Lost Broken Men

Brad Zellar

10/18/2014 - 5:30pm

Central Library - Community Room

In partnership with the UW Arts Institute and FlakPhoto, the Wisconsin Book Festival brings you an event with Brad Zellar.

 

Longtime Alec Soth collaborator Brad Zellar will talk about the unusual genesis of House of Coates (recently reissued by Coffee House Press), his relationship with the book's reclusive protagonist (Lester B. Morrison), and how a full-immersion study of lonely men and isolation eventually inspired the LBM Dispatch team to go out into America in search of social life and community.

House of Coates Revisited: Lester B. Morrison, Little Brown Mushroom, and Other Lost Broken Men -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 5:30pm</span>

19

Oct

How Many Words is a Picture Really Worth? Writing From Photographs

Brad Zellar

10/19/2014 - 11:00am

Central Library - The Bubbler

In partnership with the UW Arts Institute and FlakPhoto, the Wisconsin Book Festival presents a workshop with author Brad Zellar.

 

Photographs are spectacular crutches for writers, and excellent tools for summoning (or inventing) memories, exploring points of views, and collecting descriptive details. We'll talk about different approaches and strategies for poetry, documentary non-fiction, fiction, and memoir. Working from a collection of photos -- and participants are encouraged to bring one or two of their own -- we'll do a few quick exercises and work together to create a communal picture book composed of words and photographs.

 

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER ONLINE for this class. Registration will be capped at 20 people.  Each person should bring three photographs --snapshots (personal or found photos, but preferable smallish and things that can be passed around)-- to work with. 

How Many Words is a Picture Really Worth? Writing From Photographs -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2014 - 11:00am</span>

16

Oct

To Dwell in Darkness

Deborah Crombie

10/16/2014 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room

In the tradition of Elizabeth George, Louise Penny, and P. D. James, New York Times bestselling author Deborah Crombie delivers a powerful tale of intrigue, betrayal, and lies that will plunge married London detectives Duncan Kincaid and Gemma James into the unspeakable darkness that lies at the heart of murder. Recently transferred to the London borough of Camden from Scotland Yard headquarters, Superintendent Duncan Kincaid and his new murder investigation team are called to a deadly bombing at historic St. Pancras Station. By fortunate coincidence, Melody Talbot, Gemma's trusted colleague, witnesses the explosion. The victim was taking part in an organized protest, yet the other group members swear the young man only meant to set off a smoke bomb. As Kincaid begins to gather the facts, he finds every piece of the puzzle yields an unexpected pattern, including the disappearance of a mysterious bystander.The bombing isn't the only mystery troubling Kincaid. He's still questioning the reasons behind his transfer, and when his former boss—who's been avoiding him—is attacked, those suspicions deepen.

To Dwell in Darkness -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/16/2014 - 7:30pm</span>

03

Oct

A Sudden Light

Garth Stein

10/03/2014 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room

When a boy tries to save his parents’ marriage, he uncovers a legacy of family secrets in a coming-of-age ghost story by the author of the internationally bestselling phenomenon, The Art of Racing in the Rain.

 

A Sudden Light -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/03/2014 - 7:30pm</span>

27

Sep

The Quirks in Circus Quirkus

Erin Soderberg

09/27/2014 - 10:30am

Central Library - Children's Program Room

Just as the Quirk family was settling into Normal... Ta da! The circus comes to town! The three Quirk children—Molly, Penelope, and Finn—are learning circus skills in gym class. But true to their quirky nature, they bring what they’ve learned at school back home with them. Except who has time to practice circus acts when their nosey neighbor won’t stay out of their business? Molly, Penelope and Finn need to keep Mrs. DeVille from finding out their family secrets, or else they might have move away from Normal and onto town number 28.  This event is part of the Library's one-year anniversary in conjunction with Overture Center for the Arts's 10fest celebration.

The Quirks in Circus Quirkus -  - <span class="date-display-single">09/27/2014 - 10:30am</span>

19

Jul

Going Somewhere Ride & Read

Brian Benson

07/19/2014 - 1:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

The Wisconsin Book Festival, in partnership with the Wisconsin Bike Federation, presents a guided bike ride and reading with Brian Benson for his new bicycle memoir, GOING SOMEWHERE.  Join us at Pinney library at 1:00 pm for a ride with the author to Central Library where Brian Benson will read from his book and talk about his remarkable journey by bicycle from Wisconsin across the American West at 2:00 pm.

 

Going Somewhere Ride & Read -  - <span class="date-display-single">07/19/2014 - 1:00pm</span>

19

May

Madison Authors Reading

Kara Candito Chloe Benjamin

05/19/2014 - 7:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Join Madisonites Chloe Krug Benjamin and Kara Candito for readings from their new books. Benjamin will read from her first novel, The Anatomy of Dreams, forthcoming from Simon & Schuster (September 2014). Candito will read from her second collection of poetry, Spectator (May 2014), winner of the 2013 Agha Shahid Ali Poetry Prize. Copies of Spectator will be available for purchase at the event.

Madison Authors Reading -  - <span class="date-display-single">05/19/2014 - 7:00pm</span>

16

May

The Artist's Library

Erinn Batykefer Laura Damon-Moore

05/16/2014 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Madison Room

Creativity, like information, is free to everyone who steps into a library. An offshoot of the Library as Incubator Project, The Artist’s Library offers that an artist is any person who uses creative tools to make new things, and provides the guidance and resources to make libraries come alive as spaces for art-making and cultural engagement. The book draws attention to the physical and digital collections and resources that may be of particular use to artists and writers, provides ideas for art education opportunities within libraries, and offers practical how-tos for artists and libraries alike. From the crafty (pop-up books) to the community-minded (library galleries); the documentary (photo projects) to the technically complex (“listening” to libraries via Dewey decimal frequencies), the case studies included in the book feature artists, writers, performers, and libraries that embody the “library as incubator” spirit.

 

Join 2014 Library Journal Movers & Shakers Erinn Batykefer and Laura Damon-Moore for an evening of artistic creation, drinks by Forequarter, and a short talk and book signing.

 

The Artist's Library -  - <span class="date-display-single">05/16/2014 - 7:30pm</span>

06

May

Shotgun Lovesongs

Nickolas Butler

05/06/2014 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

A blue collar guy from the Midwest, Butler spent October and November driving to bookstores in the Heartland: Michigan, Minnesota, Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, Ohio and Kentucky—at least 80 stores—giving out copies of the galley and spending time with booksellers. They all connected to the same thing: the idea (or idealization) of small town America, which is so beautifully realized in the book.

 

The novel tells a “Big Chill”-like story of four friends who come home to a small town in rural Wisconsin to find that their relationships have altered in ways they couldn’t have predicted. There is a musician who shot to indie rock fame after recording an album in a chicken coop (he’s based on the lead singer from Bon Iver), a financier who uses his wealth to upgrade the place, a rodeo star, and a farmer who married the girl they all loved. If it sounds like an old-fashioned story—it is. But it’s one that stays with the reader, if only for the beauty of the prose, the evocation of Wisconsin farmland and the way Butler explores the complexity of longtime friendships.

Shotgun Lovesongs -  - <span class="date-display-single">05/06/2014 - 7:00pm</span>

04

Apr

Praying Drunk

Kyle Minor

04/04/2014 - 8:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

Join the Wisconsin Book Festival and The Bubbler for a Night Light event as author, Kyle Minor, reads from his new collection of short stories Praying Drunk

 

Praying Drunk -  - <span class="date-display-single">04/04/2014 - 8:00pm</span>

28

Apr

Struck By Genius

Jason Padgett

04/28/2014 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

No one else sees the world the way Jason Padgett does. Water pours from the faucet in crystalline patterns, numbers call to mind distinct geometric shapes, and intricate fractal patterns emerge from the leaves and branches of trees, revealing the intrinsic mathematical designs hidden in the objects around us.

 

Amazingly, Jason wasn’t born this way. Twelve years ago, he was a party-loving jock and a college dropout who’d never made it past pre-algebra. But a violent mugging permanently and profoundly altered the way his brain works, giving him unique gifts. His ability to understand math and physics skyrocketed. He’s now a devoted student and an award-winning artist, hand-drawing the stunning geometric patterns he sees everywhere.

 

The first documented case of acquired savant syndrome with mathematical synesthesia, Jason is a medical marvel. Some researchers see his transformation as proof that every brain possesses stunning abilities only some people are able to consciously access. Struck by Genius is the remarkable tale of Jason’s determined journey to overcome psychological and neurological trauma and embrace his new mind.

 

Struck By Genius -  - <span class="date-display-single">04/28/2014 - 7:30pm</span>

24

Apr

Biggest Book Club Ever with Nevada Barr

Nevada Barr

04/24/2014 - 6:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

Join other mystery and book club enthusiasts and bestselling author Nevada Barr for the biggest book club ever! This free event begins at 6 pm with a library facilitated book discussion of THE ROPE by Nevada Barr. At 7:30, Nevada Barr will give a brief reading followed by a question and answer session using questions identified in book group discussions. Mystery to Me bookstore will sell books at the event and a book signing to follow.
 

Biggest Book Club Ever with Nevada Barr -  - <span class="date-display-single">04/24/2014 - 6:00pm</span>

26

Feb

Bread & Butter

Michelle Wildgen

02/26/2014 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

Join Michelle Wildgen and the Wisconsin Book Festival to celebrate the release of Michelle's new novel, Bread & Butter.  Filled with hilarious insider detail--the one-upmanship of staff meals before the shift begins, the rivalry between bartender and hostess, the seedy bar where waitstaff and chefs go to drink off their workday--Bread and Butter is both an incisive novel of family and a gleeful romp through the inner workings of restaurant kitchens. 

 

Bread & Butter -  - <span class="date-display-single">02/26/2014 - 7:00pm</span>

24

Apr

Lunch for Libraries: Nosh with Nevada

Nevada Barr

04/24/2014 - 11:30am

Central Library - Community Room

Join the Madison Public Library Foundation for its third annual Lunch for Libraries fundraiser! New York Times best-selling mystery author, Nevada Barr will speak about her upcoming novel, Destroyer Angel, the eighteenth book in her Anna Pigeon series.  

 

Destroyer Angel, the 16th in the series, finds Anna once again in the forest, this time in Minnesota's Iron Range. While on a camping trip, Anna heads away from her group for a moment to spend some time alone in the wild; while she does so, the group she left behind is approached by four armed men, intending to take them hostage. The mysterious captors march the group through the wilderness, to a rendezvous spot with an airplane; but Anna is never far behind, and while she may not be armed, she has the advantage of knowing how to survive in the wilderness—and how to stalk one’s prey.

 

Tickets on sale at mplfoundation.org on March 12th!

Lunch for Libraries: Nosh with Nevada -  - <span class="date-display-single">04/24/2014 - 11:30am</span>

31

Jan

Curtain’s Up with CTM presents: An Evening with Lois Lowry

01/31/2014 - 7:00pm

Central Library - 3rd floor Community Room

Join Children's Theater of Madison for an evening with acclaimed author Lois Lowry in a special event at the Central Library previewing CTM's production of “The Giver. Ms. Lowry will be joined by APT actor Paul Bentzen, who plays the title role in the stage adaptation of Ms. Lowry's award-winning book. The evening will feature readings from the novel and the play, comments by Ms. Lowry regarding the process of adapting her novel to stage and screen, and a Q&A session with the audience. Ms. Lowry will sign books after the event. A Wisconsin Book Festival event recommended for ages 8 & up.
 

Curtain’s Up with CTM presents: An Evening with Lois Lowry -  - <span class="date-display-single">01/31/2014 - 7:00pm</span>

06

Nov

The Good Luck Girls of Shipwreck Lane

Kelly Harms

11/06/2013 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

The HomeSweetHome network’s Free House Sweepstakes has just announced this year’s lucky winner of a brand-new, fully-loaded dream home: Janine Brown of Cedar Falls, Iowa. But is it Janey Brown or Nean Brown that’s won? One, a gentle woman whose only friend is her great-aunt Midge, and the other, a woman escaping her abusive boyfriend both fight for life and love in a dream house in Maine. The Good Luck Girls of Shipwreck Lane, the debut novel from Kelly Harms, will charm readers from the very first page.

The Good Luck Girls of Shipwreck Lane -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/06/2013 - 7:00pm</span>

17

Oct

Friends of Madison Public Library Book Sale

Friends of Madison Public Library

10/17/2013 - 12:00pm

Central Library - Garage

As part of the Wisconsin Book Festival, the Friends of the Madison Public Library will be hosting their first big book sale in the new Central Library! Stop by for some great deals on used books and other materials. 

  • Thursday, October 17, 12:00pm - 6:00pm
  • Friday, October 18, 10:00am - 6:00pm
  • Saturday, October 19, 9:00am - 2:00pm

All proceeds will support The Friends of the Madison Public Library's efforts to provide volunteer support and recognition, advocacy, and supplemental funds for special projects and collections.

Friends of Madison Public Library Book Sale -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/17/2013 - 12:00pm</span>

20

Oct

Public Poets Conversation

Max Garland Wendy Vardaman Sarah Busse

10/20/2013 - 11:30am

Central Library - Community Room

Madison Poets Laureate, Sarah Busse and Wendy Vardaman, gather together poets from all walks of life for a conversation on what it means to be a public poet.  Sarah and Wendy will talk with Wisconsin Poet Laureate, Max Garland, Sofia Snow, Peggy Rogza, and Dasha Kelly.

 

Join Madison's Poets Laureate as they host a conversation around what it means to be a "public" poet.  What counts as a “public” poem? What do "poets laureate" do? What could they do? What's a "Young Poet Laureate" and should Madison have one? And what does the idea of a laureate position look like when we place it in a broader cultural, civic and artistic context? What do poets laureate and political poets and hip hop and spoken word artists have in common? How can traditional poetry and spoken word come together in the public square and should they?

Public Poets Conversation -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/20/2013 - 11:30am</span>

20

Oct

In Search of Golianthus Hercules

Jennifer Angus

10/20/2013 - 11:30am

Central Library - Childrens

Jennifer Angus will read and show illustrations from her debut novel, In Search of Golianthus Hercules.  In 1890 England, 10-year-old Henri discovers that not only can he communicate with insects but that he, too, is among their tribe. Debut author Angus builds this fantastical premise with well-placed scenes in which Henri’s own deep skepticism cleverly encourages the reader to join willingly in his discoveries, which include a housefly that can read and members of a flea circus whose performance improves when Henri translates the ringmaster’s orders. Even as his concerns become increasingly concentrated on the small world of insects, his world seems to grow. The disappearance of Henri’s father creates a framing mystery that builds on the themes of identity and metamorphosis and wraps up in a satisfying and original denouement. Illustrated with period postcards and other historical images, this moving, well-conceived novel blends the spirit of Franz Kafka and the sly humor of Eva Ibbotson and is accessible for new fantasy readers while offering something different to established fantasy fans.

In Search of Golianthus Hercules -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/20/2013 - 11:30am</span>

19

Oct

Michelle Wildgen's Humor Writing Showcase

Emma Straub Lucas Mann Michelle Wildgen Lindsay Hunter

10/19/2013 - 8:30pm

Central Library - Community Room

Novelist and Tin House editor, Michelle Wildgen hosts a late-night showcase of some of the Wisconsin Book Festival's funniest talent on Saturday night.  Come see featured authors read something a little less serious and sure to be hilarious.

Michelle Wildgen's Humor Writing Showcase -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 8:30pm</span>

20

Oct

Jewelweed

David Rhodes

10/20/2013 - 10:00am

Central Library - Community Room

With Jewelweed, this beloved author returns to the Driftless Region, and introduces a cast of characters who all find themselves struggling to find a new sense of belonging in the present moment—sometimes with the help of peach preserves or mashed potato pie.  Rich with a sense of empathy and wonder, Jewelweed offers a vision in which the ordinary becomes mythical, and the seemingly mundane is transformed into revelatory beauty.

Jewelweed -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/20/2013 - 10:00am</span>

20

Oct

Saige: Girl of the Year

Jessie Haas

10/20/2013 - 1:00pm

Central Library - Childrens

Saige Copeland loves spending time on her grandma's ranch, riding horses and painting. Her school made the tough choice to cut art classes, which means she's lost her favorite subject. So when her grandma decides to organize a "save the arts" fundraiser and parade to benefit the school, Saige jumps on board. She begins training her grandma's beautiful horse, Picasso, for his appearance in the parade. Then her grandma is injured in an accident, and she wonders what she can do to help. Can she ride Picasso in the parade and make her grandma proud? Can Saige still raise money to protect the arts at school?

Saige: Girl of the Year -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/20/2013 - 1:00pm</span>

18

Oct

High School Friday

Jessie Garcia Library as Incubator Project First Wave

10/18/2013 - 9:00am

Central Library

High School Friday brings 150 students to the Wisconsin Book Festival for a full school day of book programming.  Through meaningful interaction with authors, poets, and peers, students will see themselves as active members of the Madison community. They will gain confidence, exposure, and insight while applying skills in reading, writing, language, speaking and listening in the real world. 

 

For more information about the event, email Jessica Becker at jebecker2@wisc.edu.

High School Friday -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2013 - 9:00am</span>

19

Oct

Illustration Conversation

Briony Morrow-Cribbs Lynda Barry Ivan Brunetti Chris Ware

10/19/2013 - 2:30pm

Central Library - Bubbler

Artists Briony Morrow-Cribbs, Lynda Barry, Ivan Brunetti, and Chris Ware gather in Madison Public Library's Bubbler space for an intimate conversation about illustration.  They will answer many deep questions like How does illustration help tell a story? What do images bring to the text? Why do illustrated stories make my brain feel different?
 

Illustration Conversation -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 2:30pm</span>

19

Oct

Graphic Novelist Panel

Lynda Barry Ivan Brunetti Chris Ware

10/19/2013 - 4:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

Celebrated graphic novelists, Lynda Barry, Ivan Brunetti, and Chris Ware will discuss their most recent works.  Barry's The Freddie Stories traces a year in the life of Freddie, the youngest member of the dysfunctional Mullen family.  With consummate skill, Lynda Barry writes about the cruelty of children at this most vulnerable age when the friends they make and the paths they choose can forever change their lives.  Ivan Brunetti's eye-popping illustrated autobiography, Aesthetics: A Memoir, traces his artistic trajectory and output, from youthful doodles to his latest cover illustrations and comic strips.

Graphic Novelist Panel -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 4:00pm</span>

19

Oct

Class A: Baseball in the Middle of Everywhere

Lucas Mann

10/19/2013 - 2:30pm

Central Library - Madison Room

An unforgettable chronicle of a year of minor-league baseball in a small Iowa town that follows not only the travails of the players of the Clinton LumberKings but also the lives of their dedicated fans and of the town itself.  Award-winning essayist Lucas Mann delivers a powerful debut in his telling of the story of the 2010 season of the Clinton LumberKings. Mann turns his eye on the players, the coaches, the fans, the radio announcer, the town, and finally on himself, a young man raised on baseball, driven to know what still draws him to the stadium. His voice is as fresh and funny as it is poignant, illuminating both the small triumphs and the harsh realities of minor-league ball. Part sports story, part cultural exploration, part memoir, Class A is a moving and unique study of why we play, why we watch, and why we remember.

Class A: Baseball in the Middle of Everywhere -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 2:30pm</span>

18

Oct

Monsters of Poetry Reading

Adam Fell Kara Candito Christopher Mohar

10/18/2013 - 6:30pm

Central Library - Bubbler

Monsters of Poetry Reading Series curators Kara Candito, Christopher Mohar, and Adam Fell will be stepping up to the mic to read from their work.  Monsters of Poetry is a reading series held six times a year in Madison featuring poets, fiction, and non-fiction writers of many different stylistic species from all over the country.

Monsters of Poetry Reading -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2013 - 6:30pm</span>

18

Oct

Wisconsin Talk: Linguistic Diversity in the Badger State

Thomas Purnell, Eric Raimy, & Joseph Salmons

10/18/2013 - 5:00pm

Central Library - Bubbler

Yah, it's true! Wisconsin is one of the most linguistically interesting and diverse places in North America, with a rich heritage of Native American and immigrant languages and with three major dialects of American English.  Highlighting topics such as how maps can convey the stories of language and the diversity of bilingual speakers that enriches our communities, Wisconsin Talk brings together perspectives from linguistics, history, cultural studies, and geography to illuminate why language matters in our everyday lives.

Wisconsin Talk: Linguistic Diversity in the Badger State -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2013 - 5:00pm</span>

17

Oct

Hip Hop Arts Showcase

First Wave

10/17/2013 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room

This spoken word Hip Hop event is hosted by First Wave and features the Midwest Spoken Word and Hip Hop All-Stars. Come hear visiting youth poetry slam champions and hip hop artists from cities across the Midwest including Chicago, St. Louis, Detroit, Milwaukee, and the Twin Cities.

Hip Hop Arts Showcase -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/17/2013 - 7:30pm</span>

20

Oct

From Scratch: Inside the Food Network

Allen Salkin

10/20/2013 - 2:30pm

Central Library - Community Room

The Food Network has risen from obscurity and ridicule in the early '90s to become a powerhouse of cable television, transforming chefs like Emeril Lagasse and Paula Deen into celebrities and changing food culture forever. With a light wit and balanced perspective, Salkin, a former food and media reporter for the New York Times, presents the definitive history of the network from inception to the present day. Food Network devotees will delight at the inside knowledge of internal scandals, the intriguing biographies of their favorite star chefs, and an exclusive look at the ever-shifting lineup of executives and parent companies, unveiling a nuanced and rich tale of an empire that no one expected to survive.

From Scratch: Inside the Food Network -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/20/2013 - 2:30pm</span>

21

Sep

The Girl You Left Behind

Jojo Moyes

09/21/2013 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

The Girl You Left Behind is a spellbinding love story of two women separated by a century but united in their determination to fight for what they love most.  Jojo Moyes is the New York Times bestselling author of The Girl You Left BehindHoneymoon in Paris,Me Before You, and The Last Letter from Your Lover.

Jojo Moyes’ appearance is part of the Central Library’s Grand Opening weekend, in partnership with the Wisconsin Book Festival.  This event requires registration due to high demand; register onlineor call to register.  A meet and greet reception begins at 6 pm with light refreshments.

 

The Girl You Left Behind -  - <span class="date-display-single">09/21/2013 - 7:00pm</span>

05

Oct

The Year of Billy Miller

Kevin Henkes

10/05/2013 - 2:00pm

Central Library - Children's

When Billy Miller visits the statue of the Jolly Green Giant at the end of summer vacation, he has an unlucky fall and ends up with a small lump on his head. What a way to start second grade, with a lump on your head! As the year goes by, though, Billy figures out how to navigate elementary school, how to appreciate his little sister, and how to be a more grown up and responsible member of the family and a help to his high school teacher mom and work-at-home artist dad. Newbery Honor author and Caldecott Medalist Kevin Henkes delivers a short, satisfying, laugh-out-loud-funny school and family story that features a diorama homework assignment, a school poetry slam, cancelled sleepovers, and epic sibling temper tantrums. Illustrated throughout with black-and-white spot art by the author, this is a perfect short novel for the early elementary grades.

The Year of Billy Miller -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/05/2013 - 2:00pm</span>

20

Oct

Writing the Unthinkable

Dan Chaon Lynda Barry

10/20/2013 - 11:00am

Central Library - Bubbler

This workshop is about a way of creating a sustainable writing practice for anyone at any level who is interested in writing, but has had a hard time figuring out how to do it.

 

It’s based on using a common but extraordinary sort of memory almost of all of us have; the instant kind that ‘floods’ us when a certain smell or a song triggers a vivid image of certain place-in-time. It’s the kind of memory that is unwilled and vivid, something that feels somehow on-going and plastic, a living place where a story is happening.

 

We’ll learn an easy method to create the circumstances for these kinds of images to come to us and I’ll show you how to set them down quickly in writing.  We’ll learn the technique using autobiographical memory, and then I’ll show you how to apply it to writing fiction.

 

For more detailed information about what the workshops is like:

 

Writing the Unthinkable -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/20/2013 - 11:00am</span>

19

Oct

Library as Art Space Drop-In Workshops

Library as Incubator Project

10/19/2013 - 10:00am

Central Library - Throughout the Library

Take part in one (or all) of these wonderful workshops as you explore Central Library.  The team from the Library as Incubator Project will be on hand to teach you many new ways of experiencing a library

 

Blackout poetry

Make your own poem using words from another text. Use the pages of text in your Library Workbook (these are drawn from classic texts, how-to manuals, and other books with interesting language) and use a Sharpee to highlight the words you want your reader to see to create a poem within your text. Black out all the other words, and title your poem!

 

Mapmaking

Maps can tell you where you are, where you've been, where you’re going, and how you relate to the world around you. You can make a map for anything that can be connected-- not just places.  Look through the books and images available at the map table for inspiration, and use the blank pages in your Library Workbook to draw your own map.  Lead someone to the new library, your favorite hiding spot, or another world!

 

Tracing

Library as Art Space Drop-In Workshops -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 10:00am</span>

19

Oct

The Center Holds

Jonathan Alter

10/19/2013 - 1:30pm

Central Library - Community Room

Jonathan Alter follows up on his acclaimed bestseller, The Promise: President Obama, Year One, with a dramatic look at the last part of Obama’s first term and successful reelection in The Center Holds: Obama and His Enemies.  The Center Holds offers both historical sweep and stunning new details about the pivotal 2011-2012 period. Jonathan Alter will appear in conversation with David Maraniss.  With The Center Holds, Alter pulls back the curtain on the campaign and details the back story of the big events of our time. At the heart of this fast-paced narrative and dramatic blend of journalism and history is a story about where our country could have gone, and where it’s headed.

The Center Holds -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 1:30pm</span>

19

Oct

The Conditions of Love

Dale Kushner

10/19/2013 - 1:00pm

Central Library - Madison Room

In 1953, ten-year-old Eunice lives in the rural backwaters of Wisconsin with her outrageously narcissistic mother, a manicureeste and movie star worshipper. Throughout this stunning debut novel, Eunice is tested by destructive forces. Her innocence is lost and regained through her ability to confront and absorb change and an innate capacity for joy. The Conditions of Love explores how destiny is wrestled from fate, how place and culture affect who we are, and how the bonds of friendship and love create a home for us in the world. 

The Conditions of Love -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 1:00pm</span>

19

Oct

ReGENERATION: A Manifesto for America's Next Leaders

Rebecca Ryan

10/19/2013 - 12:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

If you knew the future, what would you do differently? Economist and generational expert Rebecca Ryan shares her futuristic view in her newest book, ReGeneration: A Manifesto for America's Next Leaders to answer the question on through seasons. In winter now, America faces choices about how it will evolve into spring, process that will change how Americans spend, relate, collaborate, work and live.

ReGENERATION: A Manifesto for America's Next Leaders -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 12:00pm</span>

19

Oct

Personal Effects

E.M. Kokie Nick Podehl

10/19/2013 - 11:00am

Central Library - Teens

The event brings together the author and audiobook narrator of a gripping YA novel about a boy's attempts to deal with the loss of his older brother in Iraq. The author and narrator will discuss how to present difficult topics to teens, the various aspects of authorship, and will show how different voices make a book more interesting with a side by side reading.  

Personal Effects -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 11:00am</span>

19

Oct

Lawyers Who Shaped Dane County

Tom Ragatz Paul Humphrey

10/19/2013 - 11:00am

Central Library - Local History Room

This 140 page hardcover book sketches the development of Dane County and the significant changes in the practice of law here, from Madison’s first lawyers in the mid-1800s to the mid- 1980s. The book profiles the lawyers who became leaders in legal practice and in the community, leaving their imprint on our area and their names on streets, parks and buildings. The book is filled with history, photos, anecdotes, and stories of Dane County’s leading lawyers, featuring names such as Olin, Tenny, Vilas, Doty, LaFollette, and Fairchild. It also traces the development of the Dane County Bar Association, women lawyers who made their mark on the profession, the courthouses, and the influence of the UW Law School.

Lawyers Who Shaped Dane County -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 11:00am</span>

19

Oct

Laura Lamont's Life in Pictures

Emma Straub

10/19/2013 - 10:30am

Central Library - Community Room

The enchanting story of a midwestern girl from Wisconsin who escapes a family tragedy and is remade as a movie star during Hollywood’s golden age. Ambitious and richly imagined, Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures is as intimate—and as bigger-than-life—as the great films of the golden age of Hollywood. Written with warmth and verve, it confirms Emma Straub’s reputation as one of the most exciting new talents in fiction.

Laura Lamont's Life in Pictures -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 10:30am</span>

18

Oct

Lost at Sea

Jon Ronson

10/18/2013 - 8:30pm

Central Library - Community Room

The New York Times–bestselling author of The Psychopath Test, Jon Ronson writes about the dark, uncanny sides of humanity with clarity and humor. Lost at Sea reveals how deep our collective craziness lies, even in the most mundane circumstances.  Amateur nuclear physicists, assisted-suicide practitioners, the town of North Pole, Alaska’s Christmas-induced high school mass-murder plot: Ronson explores all these tales with a sense of higher purpose and universality, and suddenly, mid-read, they are stories not about the fringe of society or about people far removed from our own experience, but about all of us. Incisive and hilarious, poignant and maddening, revealing and disturbing—Ronson writes about our modern world, the foibles of contemporary culture, and the chaos that lies at the edge of our daily lives.
 

Lost at Sea -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2013 - 8:30pm</span>

18

Oct

Stay Awake

Dan Chaon

10/18/2013 - 5:30pm

Central Library - Community Room

In these haunting, suspenseful stories, lost, fragile, searching characters wander between ordinary life and a psychological shadowland. They have experienced intense love or loss, grief or loneliness, displacement or disconnection—and find themselves in unexpected, dire, and sometimes unfathomable situations. Dan Chaon’s stories feature scattered families, unfulfilled dreamers, anxious souls. They exist in a twilight realm—in a place by the window late at night when the streets are empty and the world appears to be quiet. But you are up, unable to sleep. So you stay awake.

Stay Awake -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2013 - 5:30pm</span>

20

Oct

What Would Frodo Do? Faith, War, and the Birth of Modern Fantasy Literature

G. Willow Wilson

10/20/2013 - 1:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

Tolkien's groundbreaking trilogy The Lord of the Rings and CS Lewis's The Chronicles of Narnia were written at a time of upheaval: the two World Wars had given rise to a wave of skepticism and societal change in Britain and Europe, and religion, once a cornerstone of spiritual and social life, was suddenly subject to vigorous criticism. Tolkien and Lewis, both devout Christians, turned to mythology to defend their faith--but also to make sense of how that faith had been irrevocably altered. Half a world away, as Hitler was ascending to power, the American sons of European Jewish immigrants invented a comic book character drawn from the myths of Hercules and Samson, an interstellar immigrant who would defend the world against tyranny. They called him Superman. Today, as the Arab Spring and the War on Terror continue to shape the narrative of modern Islam, a new wave of Muslim fantasists is emerging, challenging the status quo both within the faith and without. What is the relationship between faith and fantasy? Why do great works of fantasy literature so often emerge during times of war and conflict?

What Would Frodo Do? Faith, War, and the Birth of Modern Fantasy Literature -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/20/2013 - 1:00pm</span>

20

Oct

Wheel Fever

Jesse Gant & Nicholas Hoffman

10/20/2013 - 10:00am

Central Library - Meet on the corner of Mifflin and Henry Streets

After a short talk about their new book, authors, Nicholas and Jesse, will lead a historical bike ride through downtown Madison beginning and ending at Madison Central Library.

Wheel Fever -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/20/2013 - 10:00am</span>

19

Oct

ROY G. BIV

Jude Stewart

10/19/2013 - 1:00pm

Central Library - Bubbler

Picture these in your mind’s eye: a blackened tomato. The word YELLOW written in blue type. A fresh, unsullied watercolor set. The leafy greens of Ireland. Your football team’s colors. Color means something. Drawing on a broad array of disciplines and brimming with wit and felicity throughout, Jude Stewart’s ROY G. BIV unlocks a whole new way of looking at the world around us—via the entertaining and indeed exceedingly surprising lens that is color.

ROY G. BIV -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 1:00pm</span>

19

Oct

Attempts at Love in Greece

John D'Agata

10/19/2013 - 4:00pm

Central Library - Bubbler

As the resurgence of the essay continues, John D'Agata takes us back to one of the world's earliest essayists, Mestrius Plutarch, a 2nd century Greek writer who might also be one of history's most innovative essayists.  D'Agata will read excerpts from his forthcoming book, Attempts at Love in Greece, a collection of Plutrach translations.
 

Attempts at Love in Greece -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 4:00pm</span>

17

Oct

Philosophical Portraits: Descartes & Nietzsche

Steven Nadler & Jennifer Ratner Rosenhagen

10/17/2013 - 5:30pm

Central Library - Bubbler

A historian and philosopher reflect on the lives and afterlives of two thinkers who mark the beginning and end of modern philosophy.  Presented in partnership with the Center for the Humanities at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  Hosted by Steve Paulson with an introduction by Sara Guyer.

Philosophical Portraits: Descartes & Nietzsche -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/17/2013 - 5:30pm</span>

19

Oct

Farm Fresh and Fast

Fairshare CSA Coalition

10/19/2013 - 10:00am

Central Library - Bubbler

The Fairshare CSA Coalition will discuss how they created their newest cookbook, Farm Fresh and Fast. They will highlight how to put together a locally-focused cookbook, tips on writing your own community sourced book, and developing recipes. This event will be hosted by local cookbook author, Terese Allen.

Farm Fresh and Fast -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 10:00am</span>

18

Oct

I Believe in Zero: Learning From The World's Children

Caryl Stern

10/18/2013 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

Stern’s moving and ultimately uplifting memoir paints a vivid portrait of the lives impacted through the efforts of UNICEF around the world, and their mission to reduce the number of children under age five who die from preventable causes from 19,000 each day to zero.

I Believe in Zero: Learning From The World's Children -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2013 - 7:00pm</span>

18

Oct

My Life with the Green & Gold: Tales from 20 Years of Sportscasting

Jessie Garcia

10/18/2013 - 4:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

Sportscaster, Jessie Garcia, host of WTMJ’s “The Mike McCarthy Show,” offers behind-the-microphone insights into the Green Bay Packers and other Wisconsin sports teams and athletes. As one of the first female sportscasters in the Midwest, Garcia brings fans to the sidelines at Lambeau Field, inside the locker room, aboard the team bus, and into the host’s chair at The Mike McCarthy Show. Green Bay Packer and NFL fans alike will enjoy Garcia’s tales of the green & gold team from her perspective as a Packer fan, journalist, and working mom.

My Life with the Green & Gold: Tales from 20 Years of Sportscasting -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2013 - 4:00pm</span>

19

Oct

The Book of Matt

Stephen Jimenez

10/19/2013 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room

The Book of Matt is a provocative and spellbinding examination of the 1998 murder of Matthew Shepard, unraveling for the first time the hidden complexities, motives, personailties, and events surrounding this landmark American crime.

 

Author Meet & Greet: Stephen Jimenez

10/19/2013 - 5:30 - 6:30pm
The author Meet & Greet event is cancelled. Contact 266-6318 for more information.

The Book of Matt -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 7:00pm</span>

17

Oct

Expecting Better

Emily Oster

10/17/2013 - 11:30am

Central Library - Community Room

Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong—and What You Really Need to Know. EXPECTING BETTER is about knowing more in order to worry less. It empowers women with the information they need to make decisions that are right for them. Oster has done the hard work for us, sifting through the data and studies with her proven expertise so that we can ask the right questions, make informed decisions, and stop the unnecessary worry that accompanies so many couples through nine months.

Expecting Better -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/17/2013 - 11:30am</span>

19

Oct

Sea Creatures

Susanna Daniel

10/19/2013 - 5:30pm

Central Library - Community Room

In Sea Creatures, a riveting domestic drama by Susanna Daniel, a mother must make the unthinkable choice between her husband and her son. While Miami has inspired its satirical works of genius, chilling mystery novels and excellent accounts of Cuban exile, we’ve mostly run short on first-rate literature . . . But Daniel, with Sea Creatures, gets it absolutely pitch perfect.

Sea Creatures -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 5:30pm</span>


201 W. Mifflin Street
Madison, WI 53703

 

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