NOVEMBER 2-5, 2017

and year round

in partnership with the MADISON PUBLIC LIBRARY FOUNDATION

03

Nov

Life In A Northern Town

Mary Dougherty

11/03/2017 - 5:00pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum

The Wisconsin Historical Museum and the Wisconsin Historical Society Press present a happy hour book talk with Mary Dougherty, author of Life in a Northern Town: Cooking, Eating, and Other Adventures Along Lake Superior. This one-of-a-kind collection of globally and regionally inspired recipes features local cheeses, meats, and produce from the farmers in and around Bayfield, including pho made with beef bones from a farm in Mellen, Indian meatballs with curry powder made in Washburn, and chowder with corn and potatoes from a farm stand in Ashland. Attendees will enjoy samples of Dougherty’s Sugar Bush Margarita while hearing about the inspirations behind many of the book’s recipes.

Life In A Northern Town -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/03/2017 - 5:00pm</span>

04

Nov

How To Be An Indian In The 21st Century

Louis V. Clark III (Two Shoes)

11/04/2017 - 3:00pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum

Oneida author and poet Louis V. Clark III (Two Shoes) takes readers along on his life-long journey, in prose and verse, chronicling a voyage from schoolyard bullies to workplace barriers on his way to discovering "how to be an Indian in the 21st Century." Warm, plainspoken, and wryly funny Clark shares his own American Indian story, talking frankly about a culture's struggle to maintain its heritage. His deceptively simple, poetic storytelling matches the rhythm of the life he recounts, what he calls "the heartbeat of my nation." Readers travel along with Clark on a deeply personal and profound quest of self-discovery.

How To Be An Indian In The 21st Century -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 3:00pm</span>

04

Nov

The Storm Before The Storm

Mike Duncan

11/04/2017 - 10:30am

Wisconsin Historical Museum

The creator of the massively popular, award-winning podcast series The History of Rome brings to life the story of the tumultuous years that set the stage for the fall of the Roman Republic. The Roman Republic was one of the most remarkable achievements in the history of civilization. After its founding in 509 BCE, the Romans refused to allow a single leader to seize control of the state and grab absolute power. The Roman commitment to cooperative government and peaceful transfers of power was unmatched in the history of the ancient world.

 

The Storm Before The Storm -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 10:30am</span>

04

Nov

Thousand-Miler

Melanie Radzicki McManus

11/04/2017 - 12:00pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum

Follow author Melanie Radzicki McManus along on her thrilling, trying, and triumphant 1,100-mile thru hike of the Ice Age Trail. With prose that is alternately harrowing and humorous, McManus takes her own "into-the-wild" Ice Age experience through Wisconsin's forests, prairies, wetlands, farms, and far-flung small towns and through her encounters with wildlife, injured feet, an elusive fellow hiker known as Papa Bear and the history of the still-developing national scenic trail itself.

Thousand-Miler -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 12:00pm</span>

04

Nov

Warriors, Saints, and Scoundrels

Michael Edmonds

11/04/2017 - 1:30pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum

Presented in partnership with the Dane County Historical Society, come meet the mayors, ministers, mystics, murderers, and more whose lives influenced and defined the state of Wisconsin in 80 short, colorful narratives. Michael Edmonds and Samantha Snyder plumbed the depths of the Wisconsin Historical Society's collections to research and compose lively portraits of such notables as a governor who saw ghosts, an incorrigible horse thief, a husband and wife who each stood over seven feet tall, an American Indian chief who defied forced removal, and the first woman to practice law before the Supreme Court.

Warriors, Saints, and Scoundrels -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/04/2017 - 1:30pm</span>

22

Oct

Good Seeds: A Menominee Indian Food Memoir

Thomas Pecore Weso

10/22/2016 - 3:00pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum

In this food memoir, named for the "manoomin" or wild rice that also gives the Menominee tribe its name, tribal member Thomas Pecore Weso takes readers on a cook's journey through Wisconsin's northern woods. He connects each food beaver, trout, blackberry, wild rice, maple sugar, partridge with colorful individuals who taught him Indigenous values. Cooks will learn from his authentic recipes. Amateur and professional historians will appreciate firsthand stories about reservation life during the mid-twentieth century, when many elders, fluent in the Algonquian language, practiced the old ways.
 

Good Seeds: A Menominee Indian Food Memoir -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 3:00pm</span>

22

Oct

Miss Paul and The President & Two Friends

Dean Robbins

10/22/2016 - 10:30am

Wisconsin Historical Museum

Dean Robbins brings to life incredible moments from our nation's history in two new children's books, Miss Paul & The President and Two Friends.
 
About Miss Paul and The President:
 
When Alice Paul was a child, she saw her father go off to vote while her mother had to stay home. But why should that be? So Alice studied the Constitution and knew that the laws needed to change. But who would change them?  She would! In her signature purple hat, Alice organized parades and wrote letters and protested outside the White House. She even met with President Woodrow Wilson, who told her there were more important issues to worry about than women voting. But nothing was more important to Alice. So she kept at it, and soon President Wilson was persuaded.  Dean Robbins and illustrator Nancy Zhang bring the unsung hero to vivid life and show young voters-to-be how important it is to never back down from a cause you believe in!
 
About Two Friends:
 

Miss Paul and The President & Two Friends -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 10:30am</span>

22

Oct

Fates & Traitors

Jennifer Chiaverini

10/22/2016 - 1:30pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum

The New York Times bestselling author of Mrs. Lincoln’s Dressmaker returns with a riveting work of historical fiction following the notorious John Wilkes Booth and the four women who kept his perilous confidence.  John Wilkes Booth, the mercurial son of an acclaimed British stage actor and a Covent Garden flower girl, committed one of the most notorious acts in American history—the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.
 
The subject of more than a century of scholarship, speculation, and even obsession, Booth is often portrayed as a shadowy figure, a violent loner whose single murderous act made him the most hated man in America. Lost to history until now is the story of the four women whom he loved and who loved him in return: Mary Ann, the steadfast matriarch of the Booth family; Asia, his loyal sister and confidante; Lucy Lambert Hale, the senator’s daughter who adored Booth yet tragically misunderstood the intensity of his wrath; and Mary Surratt, the Confederate widow entrusted with the secrets of his vengeful plot. 
 

Fates & Traitors -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 1:30pm</span>

21

Oct

Some Like it Cold

Larry Williams

10/21/2016 - 3:00pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum

Dive in to a luau-style celebration of Wisconsin's surfing history. Meet surfing legend Larry "Longboard" Williams who will guide attendees through the crazy, inspiring true story of how he and his twin brother Lee transformed their hometown, Sheboygan, into a destination for surfers worldwide. The book talk event will feature Happy Hour surf-themed refreshments provided by Miko Poké and the Avenue Club. ” This event is cohosted by the Wisconsin Historical Society's Wisconsin Historical Museum, Society Press, and "Dive In," an initiative exploring Wisconsin's water history through programs, events and exhibits.
 

Some Like it Cold -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/21/2016 - 3:00pm</span>

22

Oct

The Fever of 1721

Stephen Coss

10/22/2016 - 12:00pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum

More than fifty years before the American Revolution, Boston was in revolt against the tyrannies of the Crown, Puritan authority, and superstition. This is the story of a fateful year that prefigured the events of 1776. Stephen Coss brings to life an amazing cast of characters in a year that changed the course of medical history, American journalism, and colonial revolution. We meet Cotton Mather, the great Puritan preacher; Zabdiel Boylston, a doctor whose family name is on one of Boston’s grand streets; James Franklin and his younger brother Benjamin; and Elisha Cooke, who became the political mentor, model, and lodestar to Samuel Adams and the Patriots.
 

The Fever of 1721 -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/22/2016 - 12:00pm</span>

20

Oct

Hidden Thunder

Robert Boszhardt Geri Schrab

10/20/2016 - 7:00pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum

A watercolor artist and an archeologist team up to interpret the hidden history and heritage painted in American Indian rock art found in the Upper Midwest in Hidden Thunder: Rock Art of the Upper Midwest. With an eye toward preservation, Geri Schrab and Robert "Ernie" Boszhardt take you along as they research, document and interpret the petroglyphs and pictographs made in past millennia.
 
Offering the dual perspectives of scientist and artist, Boszhardt shares the facts that archaeologists have been able to establish about these important artifacts of our early history, while Schrab offers the artist's experience, describing her emotional and creative response upon encountering and painting these sites. In addition to publicly accessible sites such as Wisconsin's Roche-A-Cri State Park and Minnesota's Jeffers Petroglyphs, their book covers the artistic treasures found at several remote and inaccessible rock art sites in the Upper Midwest--revealing the ancient stories through words, full-color photographs, and Schrab's watercolor renditions.
 

Hidden Thunder -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/20/2016 - 7:00pm</span>

23

Oct

Whispers & Shadows

Jerry Apps

10/23/2015 - 11:00am

Wisconsin Historical Museum

In these times of technological innovation and fast-paced electronic communication, we often take nature for granted--or even consider it a hindrance to our human endeavors. In "Whispers and Shadows: A Naturalist's Memoir", Jerry Apps explores such topics as the human need for wilderness, rediscovering a sense of wonder, and his father's advice to "listen for the whispers" and "look in the shadows" to learn nature's deepest lessons.

Whispers & Shadows -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/23/2015 - 11:00am</span>

24

Oct

Picto-Poems

Kim Blaeser

10/24/2015 - 3:00pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum

This event features Wisconsin Poet Laureate Kim Blaeser’s “Picto-Poems,” intersecting layers of text and image inspired by Native American pictographs.  Blaeser will read the poems, visually present the art images, and discuss the examples of this new creative project. The picto-poems bring her nature and wildlife photography together with poetry to explore intersecting ideas of Native place, nature, preservation, and spiritual sustenance. Others re-mix and re-examine historical images of Native peoples, or trace the connections between contemporary Indigenous experiences and indelible place markers of story. Taken from the evolving collection Ancient Light, these images invite reorientation as they blur the lines between place and spirit, between anger and humor, between image and voice.

Picto-Poems -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 3:00pm</span>

24

Oct

The League of Outsider Baseball

Gary Cieradkowski

10/24/2015 - 1:30pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum

The League of Outsider Baseball: An Illustrated History of Baseball’s Forgotten Heroes is a truly unique look at the players and personalities that exist in the obscure corners of baseball’s history. These are the stories you rarely hear or read about from the fringes of ‘organized’ baseball—the Negro Leagues, semipro town teams, foreign leagues, the low minors, and so on—lovingly collected, and evocatively illustrated, for the first time. The League of Outsider Baseball is a tribute to all the great players, known and unknown, that make baseball the greatest sport in the world.

The League of Outsider Baseball -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 1:30pm</span>

24

Oct

Meet Me Halfway: Milwaukee Stories

Jennifer Morales

10/24/2015 - 12:00pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum

When Johnquell, an African American teen, suffers a serious accident in the home of his white neighbor, Mrs. Czernicki, his community must find ways to bridge divisions between black and white, gay and straight, old and young. Set in one of the nation’s most highly segregated cities—Milwaukee, Wisconsin—Meet Me Halfway tells stories of connections in a community with a tumultuous and divided past. In nine stories told from diverse perspectives, Jennifer Morales captures a Rust Belt city’s struggle to establish a common ground and a collective vision of the future.

Morales gives life to multifaceted characters—white schoolteachers and senior citizens, Latino landlords, black and Puerto Rican teens, political activists, and Vietnam vets. As their lives unfold in these stories, we learn about Johnquell’s family—his grandparents’ involvement in the local Black Panther Party, his sister’s on-again, off-again friendship with a white classmate, and his aunt’s identity crisis as she finds herself falling in love with a woman. We also meet Johnquell’s mother, Gloria, and his school friend Taquan, who is struggling to chart his own future.

Meet Me Halfway: Milwaukee Stories -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 12:00pm</span>

24

Oct

Local Food Solutions

Ali Berlow Alan Guebert & Mary Grace Foxwell

10/24/2015 - 10:30am

Wisconsin Historical Museum

Join authors Ali Berlow, Alan Guebert, and Gracie Foxwell, alongside local farmers for a discussion of how we can all engage with the food we eat.  We will discuss practical approaches and common challenges to eating sustainably and present tangible things we all can do to improve our food system.   
 
 
About The Food Activist Handbook:

Local Food Solutions -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/24/2015 - 10:30am</span>

18

Oct

Son of Fortune

Victoria McKernan

10/18/2014 - 1:30pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum

Son of Fortune is the gripping sequel to The Devil's Paintbox, by acclaimed historical fiction writer Victoria McKernan. Aiden Lynch is a survivor--only 16 years old, he's seen himself through near-starvation on the Kansas prairie, a brutal journey on the Oregon trail, and backbreaking work in a lumber camp. Now he's reached the glittering city of San Francisco, and though his future is uncertain, promise lies ahead. Luck seems to favor him as he manages to stay one step ahead of trouble, even in the city's notoriously dangerous Barbary Coast. And it is pure fortune that leads him to a wealthy family, and then the high-stakes poker game in which he wins a ship--fully outfitted and ready for trade. The trade he has inherited: importing guano, a highly potent fertilizer, from island mines in Peru.

Son of Fortune -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 1:30pm</span>

18

Oct

Seventh Generation Earth Ethics: Native Voices of Wisconsin

Patty Loew

10/18/2014 - 3:00pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum

Wisconsin's rich tradition of sustainability rightfully includes its First Americans, who along with Aldo Leopold, John Muir, and Gaylord Nelson shaped its landscape and informed its "earth ethics." This collection of Native biographies, one from each of the twelve Indian nations of Wisconsin, introduces the reader to some of the most important figures in Native sustainability: from anti-mining activists like Walt Bresette (Red Cliff Ojibwe) and Hillary Waukau (Menominee) to treaty rights advocates like James Schlender (Lac Courte Oreille Ojibwe), artists like Truman Lowe (Ho-Chunk), and educators like Dorothy "Dot" Davids (Stockbridge-Munsee Community Band of Mohican Indians), along with tribal genealogists, land stewards, and preservers of language and culture. Each of the biographies speaks to traditional ecological values and cultural sensibilities, highlighting men and women who helped to sustain and nurture their nations in the past and present.

 

 Seventh Generation Earth Ethics: Native Voices of Wisconsin -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 3:00pm</span>

18

Oct

My Family and Other Hazards

June Melby

10/18/2014 - 12:00pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum

A funny, heartwarming memoir about saying goodbye to your childhood home, in this case a quirky, one-of-a-kind, family-run miniature golf course in the woods of Wisconsin.  When June Melby was ten years old, her parents decided on a whim to buy the miniature golf course in the small Wisconsin town where they vacationed every summer. Without any business experience or outside employees, the family sets out to open Tom Thumb Miniature Golf to the public. Naturally, there are bumps along the way. In My Family and Other Hazards, Melby recreates all the squabbling, confusion, and ultimately triumph, of one family’s quest to build something together, and brings to life the joys of one of America’s favorite pastimes. In sharp, funny prose, we get the hazards that taunted players at each hole, and the dedication and hard work that went into each one’s creation. All the familiar delights of summer are here—snowcones and popcorn and long days spent with people you love.

 

My Family and Other Hazards -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 12:00pm</span>

18

Oct

Armed with Nonviolence: Stories from the Fight for Human Rights

Ann Bausum

10/18/2014 - 10:30am

Wisconsin Historical Museum

This program for teens and adults draws from Ann Bausum's books Marching to the Mountaintop, Freedom Riders and With Courage and Cloth to show parallel uses of nonviolent resistance in the fight for human rights. During the 1910s women picketed the White House and went to jail in their quest for the right to vote. Fifty years later participants in the Civil Rights Movement used nonviolent protests to break down the barriers of segregation. Using stories from these campaigns and quotes from the times, the author shows how qualities like courage, ingenuity, camaraderie, and the influence of the news media have made the difference in winning fights for human rights. The program includes examples of how music played a part in each of the featured struggles as well.  Presented in partnership with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom.

Armed with Nonviolence: Stories from the Fight for Human Rights -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/18/2014 - 10:30am</span>

19

Oct

Letters Home to Sarah: The Civil War Letters of Guy C. Taylor, Thirty-Sixth Wisconsin Volunteers

Kevin & Patsy Alderson

10/19/2013 - 10:00am

Wisconsin Historical Museum - 1st Floor

A moving collection of newly discovered letters that captures the range of emotions and experiences of the American Civil War. Forgotten for more than a century in an old cardboard box, these are the letters of Guy Carlton Taylor, a farmer who served in the thirty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the American Civil War. From March 23, 1864 to July 14, 1865, Taylor wrote 165 letters home to his wife Sarah and their son Charley.  This remarkable trove of letters, which had been left in the attic of Taylor’s former home in Cashton, Wisconsin, was discovered by local historian Kevin Alderson at a household auction. Recognizing them for the treasure they are, Alderson bought the letters and, aided by his wife Patsy, painstakingly transcribed the letters and researched Taylor’s story in Wisconsin and at historical sites of the Civil War.

Letters Home to Sarah: The Civil War Letters of Guy C. Taylor, Thirty-Sixth Wisconsin Volunteers  -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 10:00am</span>

19

Oct

Sister: An African American Life in Search of Justice

Jody LePage

10/19/2013 - 3:00pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum - 1st Floor

This oral history brings us into the presence of an extraordinary individual. Rarely does such a voice receive a hearing.  Sylvia Bell White went North as a teenager, dreaming of a nursing career and a freedom defined in part by wartime rhetoric about American ideals. In Milwaukee she and her brothers persevered through racial rebuffs and discrimination to find work.  When a Milwaukee police officer killed her younger brother Daniel Bell in 1958, the Bell family suspected a racial murder but could do nothing to prove it—until twenty years later, when one of the two officers involved in the incident unexpectedly came forward.  Sylvia was the driving force behind their quest for justice. 

Sister: An African American Life in Search of Justice -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 3:00pm</span>

19

Oct

Queen of the Air

Dean Jensen

10/19/2013 - 1:00pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum - 1st Floor

She was simply known as Leitzel. Just four foot nine and a mere ninety-four pounds, Lillian Leitzel was one of the most famous women in the world at the turn of the twentieth century. Her feats as an aerialist mesmerized crowds across the globe and for two decades during its golden age, she was the star of the big top. In QUEEN OF THE AIR: A True Story of Love and Tragedy at the Circus, author and former Milwaukee Journal Sentinel art critic Dean Jensen brings Leitzel back to life in this beautifully written narrative.

Queen of the Air -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/19/2013 - 1:00pm</span>


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Madison, WI 53703

 

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