OCTOBER 11-14, 2018

and year round

in partnership with the MADISON PUBLIC LIBRARY FOUNDATION

21

Sep

Love, InshAllah

Nura Maznavi

09/21/2018 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301-302

Romance, dating, sex and - Muslim women? In this groundbreaking collection, 25 American Muslim writers sweep aside stereotypes to share their search for love openly for the first time, showing just how varied the search for love can be--from singles' events and online dating, to college flirtations and arranged marriages, all with a uniquely Muslim twist. 

 

Often when we engage with the Muslim community in Madison, and even across the nation, the topic of discussion tend to be solemn and serious (unfortunately with the climate), but tonight we invite you to join us for a night of storytelling with young, Muslim American couples who will be sharing their love stories. Love is a universal phenomena but everyone has their own journey. Our storytellers will give you a glimpse into their own love stories to showcase the diversity found within the Muslim community that is often painted as a monolith community. 

 

We will host a guest speaker, the author and editor of "Love, InshAllah: The Secret Love Lives of American Muslims", Nura Maznavi. Dessert and tea bar on site to enjoy as well! Childcare will be available.

 

Love, InshAllah -  - <span class="date-display-single">09/21/2018 - 7:00pm</span>

24

Sep

Collected Works of Meg Medina

Meg Medina

09/24/2018 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301-302

Presented in partnership with the Friends of the Cooperative Children's Book Center, Meg Medina will be at the Wisconsin Book Festival to discuss her books for kids of all ages.

 

Meg Medina is an award-winning Cuban American author of picture books, middle grade novels, and teen fiction. She was the 2016 recipient of the Pura Belpré Honor medal for her picture book, Mango, Abuela and Me, the 2014 recipient of the Pura Belpre Medal for her young adult novel, Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass, and the 2012 recipient of the Ezra Jack Keats New Writers Medal for her picture book Tia Isa Wants a Car. Meg’s most recent young adult novel, Burn Baby Burn, was long listed for the National Book Award and shortlisted for the Kirkus Prize.

 

The Friends of the Cooperative Children's Book Center will host a welcome reception at 6:30 PM. Gather and learn about the incredible work the CCBC does to support teaching, learning, and research related to children’s and young adult literature.

 

Collected Works of Meg Medina -  - <span class="date-display-single">09/24/2018 - 7:00pm</span>

25

Sep

Burn Baby Burn

Meg Medina

09/25/2018 - 1:15pm

- School Visits

Meg Medina is an award-winning Cuban American author of picture books, middle grade novels, and teen fiction. She was the 2016 recipient of the Pura Belpré Honor medal for her picture book, Mango, Abuela and Me, the 2014 recipient of the Pura Belpre Medal for her young adult novel, Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass, and the 2012 recipient of the Ezra Jack Keats New Writers Medal for her picture book Tia Isa Wants a Car. Meg’s most recent young adult novel, Burn Baby Burn, was long listed for the National Book Award and shortlisted for the Kirkus Prize.

Burn Baby Burn -  - <span class="date-display-single">09/25/2018 - 1:15pm</span>

26

Sep

There There

Tommy Orange

09/26/2018 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Madison Room

As we learn the reasons that each person is attending the Big Oakland Powwow—some generous, some fearful, some joyful, some violent—momentum builds toward a shocking yet inevitable conclusion that changes everything. Jacquie Red Feather is newly sober and trying to make it back to the family she left behind in shame. Dene Oxendene is pulling his life back together after his uncle’s death and has come to work at the powwow to honor his uncle’s memory. Opal Viola Victoria Bear Shield has come to watch her nephew Orvil, who has taught himself traditional Indian dance through YouTube videos and will to perform in public for the very first time. There will be glorious communion, and a spectacle of sacred tradition and pageantry. And there will be sacrifice, and heroism, and loss.

 

There There -  - <span class="date-display-single">09/26/2018 - 7:00pm</span>

27

Sep

Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder

Caroline Fraser

09/27/2018 - 5:00pm

Wisconsin Historical Society Auditorium

Presented in partnership with the Friends of UW-Madison Libraries, the 2017 Schewe Lecture features Pulitzer Prize winner, Caroline Fraser, speaking about her new book, Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder.

 

Millions of readers of Little House on the Prairie believe they know Laura Ingalls—the pioneer girl who survived blizzards and near-starvation on the Great Plains, and the woman who wrote the famous autobiographical books. But the true saga of her life has never been fully told. Now, drawing on unpublished manuscripts, letters, diaries, and land and financial records, Caroline Fraser—the editor of the Library of America edition of the Little House series—masterfully fills in the gaps in Wilder’s biography. Revealing the grown-up story behind the most influential childhood epic of pioneer life, she also chronicles Wilder's tumultuous relationship with her journalist daughter, Rose Wilder Lane, setting the record straight regarding charges of ghostwriting that have swirled around the books.

 

Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder -  - <span class="date-display-single">09/27/2018 - 5:00pm</span>

07

Oct

Max Einstein: The Genius Experiment

James Patterson

10/07/2018 - 10:00am

Overture Center for the Arts - Capitol Theater

The world's #1 bestselling author James Patterson will be appearing at the Wisconsin Book Festival in conversation with Steve Paulson from WPR's To The Best of Our Knowledge.  Free copies of Max Einstein will be distributed to the first 500 young readers.

 

Albert Einstein + James Patterson = A Must Read!  The world's #1 bestselling author has teamed up with the world's most famous genius to entertain, educate and inspire a generation of kids--with the first and only kids' book series officially approved by the Albert Einstein Archives. Twelve-year-old orphan Max Einstein (like Albert Einstein himself) is not your typical genius. Max hacks the computer system at NYU in order to attend college courses (even though she hates tests), builds homemade inventions to help the homeless, and plays speed chess in the park. Her not-so-normal life is crazy but predictable until...

 

Max Einstein: The Genius Experiment -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/07/2018 - 10:00am</span>

09

Oct

How to Leave: Quitting the City and Coping with a New Reality

Erin Clune

10/09/2018 - 7:00pm

Mystery To Me

An uproarious memoir/tongue-in-cheek guide to leaving the cool city in which you "found" yourself and moving somewhere far more ordinary.

 

So you escaped whatever humdrum little town you grew up in and moved to The Big City. Maybe it was New York. Maybe it was Seattle or Kansas City. Wherever it was, there was amazing stuff everywhere you turned: Ethiopian food! A movie theater that played documentaries! A hairstylist who knew what to do with frizz! You overlooked the proximity of your kitchen to your bed, and the fact that you had to take public transportation to see nature.

 

But then you got a job offer you couldn't refuse. Or you developed asthma. Or you got pregnant. Or you got pregnant for the second time and you couldn't use your closet as a bedroom for two babies. And you decided you had to leave.

 

How to Leave: Quitting the City and Coping with a New Reality -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/09/2018 - 7:00pm</span>

10

Oct

The Illimitable Freedom of the Human Mind: Thomas Jefferson’s Idea of a University

Andrew Jackson O'Shaughnessy

10/10/2018 - 4:30pm

Wisconsin Historical Society Auditorium

Presented in partnership with the Wisconsin Historical Society, the 2018 James Madison Lecture welcomes Andrew O'Shaughnessy to speak about Thomas Jefferson’s revolutionary ideas about higher education, which continue to have relevance to public education in our country today. Dr. O’Shaughnessy is the Vice President of Monticello, the Saunders Director of the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at the Thomas Jefferson Foundation, Professor of History at the University of Virginia, and a prize-winning author.

The Illimitable Freedom of the Human Mind: Thomas Jefferson’s Idea of a University -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/10/2018 - 4:30pm</span>

11

Oct

The Great Believers

Rebecca Makkai

10/11/2018 - 5:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

The Great Believers is the first novel about the AIDS epidemic in Chicago, which was and is the third largest city in America. A Chicago native, Makkai digs deep into the history and heart of how AIDS affected her hometown, and turns her research into a beautifully poignant novel that feels almost too real to be fiction. In her stunning new book, award-winning author Rebecca Makkai weaves together 1980s Chicago and contemporary Paris to tell a story of survivors who were forever affected by the AIDS crisis.

The Great Believers -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/11/2018 - 5:30pm</span>

11

Oct

The Motherhood Affidavits

Laura Jean Baker

10/11/2018 - 5:30pm

Room of One's Own

“Laura Jean Baker has written a beautiful and brave memoir of motherhood and its discontents, which are indistinguishable from its joys. This is a warmly intimate yet intellectually provocative personal document of originality and considerable charm.”
—Joyce Carol Oates

 

With the birth of her first child, soon-to-be professor Laura Jean Baker finds herself electrified by oxytocin, the “love hormone”—the first effective antidote to her lifelong depression. Over the next eight years, her “oxy” cravings, and her family, only grow—to the dismay of her husband, Ryan, a freelance public defender. As her reckless baby–making threatens her family’s middle–class existence, Baker identifies more and more with Ryan’s legal clients, often drug–addled fellow citizens of Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Is she any less desperate for her next fix?

 

The Motherhood Affidavits -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/11/2018 - 5:30pm</span>

11

Oct

Madison in the Sixties

Stu Levitan

10/11/2018 - 5:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

An engrossing time-machine for readers, Madison in the Sixties details the ten tumultuous years that changed Madison, WI and its Big 10 university forever, including civil rights and anti-war movements, the drama of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Monona Terrace proposal, major public works projects, the economic and cultural impact of Baby Boomers, and more.

Madison in the Sixties -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/11/2018 - 5:30pm</span>

11

Oct

The Tangled Tree

David Quammen

10/11/2018 - 6:00pm

Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery - DeLuca Forum

In the mid-1970s, scientists began using DNA sequences to reexamine the history of all life. Perhaps the most startling discovery to come out of this new field—the study of life’s diversity and relatedness at the molecular level—is horizontal gene transfer (HGT), or the movement of genes across species lines. It turns out that HGT has been widespread and important. For instance, we now know that roughly eight percent of the human genome arrived not through traditional inheritance from directly ancestral forms, but sideways by viral infection—a type of HGT.

 

The Tangled Tree -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/11/2018 - 6:00pm</span>

11

Oct

Citizen Illegal

José Olivarez

10/11/2018 - 7:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Citizen Illegal is a revealing portrait of life as a first generation immigrant, a celebration of Chicano joy, a shout against erasure, and a vibrant re-imagining of Mexican American life. In this stunning debut, poet José Olivarez explores the stories, contradictions, joys, and sorrows that embody life in the spaces between Mexico and America. He paints vivid portraits of good kids, bad kids, families clinging to hope, life after the steel mills, gentrifying barrios, and everything in between. Drawing on the rich traditions of Latinx and Chicago writers like Sandra Cisneros and Gwendolyn Brooks, Olivarez creates a home out of life in the in-between. Combining wry humor with potent emotional force, Olivarez takes on complex issues of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and immigration using an everyday language that invites the reader in. Olivarez has a unique voice that makes him a poet to watch.

Citizen Illegal -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/11/2018 - 7:00pm</span>

11

Oct

The Immortalists

Chloe Benjamin

10/11/2018 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301-302

If you knew the date of your death, how would you live your life? It's 1969 in New York City's Lower East Side, and word has spread of the arrival of a traveling psychic who claims to be able to tell anyone the day they will die. In search of one thing they can know for sure, the Gold children–four adolescents on the cusp of self-awareness–sneak out to hear their fortunes.

 

Though the siblings keep the dates secret from one another, their prophecies inform their next five decades. Golden-boy Simon escapes to the West Coast, searching for love in 1980s San Francisco; dreamy Klara becomes a Las Vegas magician, obsessed with blurring reality and fantasy; eldest son, Daniel, seeks security as an army doctor post-9/11, hoping to control fate; and bookish Varya throws herself into longevity research, where she tests the boundary between science and immortality.

 

The Immortalists -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/11/2018 - 7:00pm</span>

11

Oct

Passing the Bass

10/11/2018 - 7:00pm

Overture Center for the Arts - Capitol Theater

Passing the Bass: A Global Tribute to NEA 2014 Jazzmaster Richard Davis is a historic event in celebration of the life and legacy of world-renowned 2014 NEA Jazzmaster Richard Davis. Davis has made an indelible impact on the world of music during his five decades as a performer and master teacher of the bass. This event will involve performances by some of his closest collaborators from across the globe, as well as, video and photographic tributes and never-before-seen memorabilia from his personal collection. 

 

At 6:00 there will be an exhibition of Richard Davis' historic memorabilia in the Capitol Theater foyer. Performances will begin at 7:00 PM featuring Andrew Cyrille (drums), Peter Dominguez (bass), Javon Jackson (sax), Aska Kaneko (violin), Angelica Sanchez (piano), and special guest artists.

 

Passing the Bass -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/11/2018 - 7:00pm</span>

11

Oct

Debut YA Writers Panel

Amelia Brunskill Adrianne Finlay Madeline Reynolds

10/11/2018 - 7:30pm

Room of One's Own

A panel discussion of debut YA writers living in the Midwest. The authors will discuss their books, their paths to publication, their thoughts on writing for young adults, and their works in progress. The authors write in a variety of genres within YA, including mystery/thriller (Amelia Brunskill - The Window), science fiction (Adrienne Finlay - Your One & Only), and fantasy (Madeline Reynolds - Illusions).

 

Debut YA Writers Panel -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/11/2018 - 7:30pm</span>

11

Oct

How Are You Going to Save Yourself

JM Holmes

10/11/2018 - 8:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Dub, Rolls, Rye, and Gio, who narrates most of these nine stories, have been friends since childhood, growing up in Pawtucket, Rhode Island. How Are You Going to Save Yourself covers roughly a decade of these inseparable friends weaving in and out of one another's lives as their futures diverge. Among their differences, Gio's mixed-race identity--with a black father, an NFL player whose injury washed him out, and a white mother--sets him apart from his friends, as does his eventual path to the Ivy League. As these four go from boys to men, they grapple with the newfound power of sex and drugs, with the force of their needs, and at times with the violence of their desires.

How Are You Going to Save Yourself -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/11/2018 - 8:30pm</span>

12

Oct

Life in the Anthropocene

Erle Ellis

10/12/2018 - 2:00pm

Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery - DeLuca Forum

Erle Ellis' latest book explains the science behind the Anthropocene and the many proposals about when to mark its beginning: the nuclear tests of the 1950s? The beginnings of agriculture? The origins of humans as a species? Erle Ellis considers the many ways that the Anthropocene’s “evolving paradigm” is reshaping the sciences, stimulating the humanities, and foregrounding the politics of life on a planet transformed by humans. The Anthropocene remains a work in progress. Is this the story of an unprecedented planetary disaster? Or of newfound wisdom and redemption? Ellis offers an insightful discussion of our role in shaping the planet, and how this will influence our future on many fronts.

 

Presented in partnership with the Wisconsin Science Festival.

Life in the Anthropocene -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/12/2018 - 2:00pm</span>

12

Oct

Writing the Unseen

Rosemary Zurlo-Cuva Katrin Talbot Andrea Potos

10/12/2018 - 4:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Join the Wisconsin Book Festival for its Writing the Unseen poetry event, featuring poets Andrea Potos, Katrin Talbot, and Rosemary Zurlo-Cuva.

 

About Andrea Potos's A Stone to Carry Home

 

In this collection Andrea Potos exults in images of luminous earthly beauty -- a blue scarf lake, Greek bread that tastes of heaven and salt, cobbled streets shining like yet in the rain -- that also hint at the inevitability of loss.  In these poems, Potos prepares to watch her daughter leave home and then takes us with her and the daughter on her journey to Greece and into the mountains of her ancestors, where eventually they arrive to the ruin that was once the home of her beloved grandfather.  There is a sense of resilience in the talismans she evokes -- cut fresh lemons and olive oil, stars in the sky that light up the stones at night, and of course, the stones themselves -- that image by image bring past and the present together to offer a deep and expansive sense of home.

 

About Katrin Talbot's The Little Red Poem: A Dosage of Placebo Poetry

 

Writing the Unseen -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/12/2018 - 4:30pm</span>

12

Oct

Love, Hate and Other Filters

Samira Ahmed

10/12/2018 - 4:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

In this unforgettable debut novel, an Indian-American Muslim teen copes with Islamophobia, cultural divides among peers and parents, and a reality she can neither explain nor escape.

 

American-born seventeen-year-old Maya Aziz is torn between worlds. There’s the proper one her parents expect for their good Indian daughter: attending a college close to their suburban Chicago home, and being paired off with an older Muslim boy her mom deems “suitable.” And then there is the world of her dreams: going to film school and living in New York City—and maybe (just maybe) pursuing a boy she’s known from afar since grade school, a boy who’s finally falling into her orbit at school.

 

There’s also the real world, beyond Maya’s control. In the aftermath of a horrific crime perpetrated hundreds of miles away, her life is turned upside down. The community she’s known since birth becomes unrecognizable; neighbors and classmates alike are consumed with fear, bigotry, and hatred. Ultimately, Maya must find the strength within to determine where she truly belongs.

Love, Hate and Other Filters -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/12/2018 - 4:30pm</span>

12

Oct

2018 Charlotte Zolotow Awards

Bao Phi

10/12/2018 - 5:00pm

Union South - Wisconsin Union

The Charlotte Zolotow Award is given annually to the author of the best picture book text published in the United States in the preceding year. Established in 1998, the award is named to honor the work of Charlotte Zolotow, a distinguished children's book editor for 38 years with Harper Junior Books, and author of more than 70 picture books, including such classic works as Mr. Rabbit and the Lovely Present (Harper, 1962) and William's Doll(Harper, 1972). Ms. Zolotow attended the University of Wisconsin in Madison on a writing scholarship from 1933-36 where she studied with Professor Helen C. White.

2018 Charlotte Zolotow Awards -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/12/2018 - 5:00pm</span>

12

Oct

Wisconsin People & Ideas 2018 Fiction and Poetry Contest Reading

Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts, & Letters

10/12/2018 - 5:00pm

Room of One's Own

Wisconsin People & Ideas, the Wisconsin Academy’s magazine of contemporary Wisconsin thought and culture, presents a reading featuring the winners of their 2018 Fiction and Poetry Contest.

 

Fiction readers include:

 

  • [1st place] Michael Hopkins, Neenah -- "Static"
  • [2nd] Jack Harris, Mazomanie -- "Aeshnidae"
  • [3rd] AnnaKay Kruger, Madison -- "A Sweet Thing"

Poetry readers include:

 

  • [1st] Jenna Rindo, Pickett -- "Head, Thorax, and Abdomen"
  • [2nd] Thomas J. Erickson, Milwaukee -- "November"
  • [3rd] Justine Jones, Madison -- "The Act"

The 2018 Fiction & Poetry Contests were supported by Wisconsin Academy donors, members, and the following sponsors: Wisconsin Public Radio, Wisconsin Book Festival, Shake Rag Alley Center for the Arts. Learn more about how to submit your work to our annual fiction and poetry contests here.

Wisconsin People & Ideas 2018 Fiction and Poetry Contest Reading -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/12/2018 - 5:00pm</span>

12

Oct

Black Queer Hoe

Britteney Black Rose Kapri

10/12/2018 - 6:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

Black Queer Hoe is a refreshing, unapologetic look at the line between sexual freedom and sexual exploitation. Women’s sexuality is often used as a weapon against them. In this powerful debut, Britteney Black Rose Kapri lends her unmistakable voice to fraught questions of identity, sexuality, reclamation, and power, in a world that refuses Black Queer women permission to define their own lives and boundaries.

Black Queer Hoe -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/12/2018 - 6:00pm</span>

12

Oct

What We Were Promised

Lucy Tan

10/12/2018 - 6:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

After years of chasing the American dream, the Zhen family has moved back to China. Settling into a luxurious serviced apartment in Shanghai, Wei, Lina and their daughter, Karen, join an elite community of Chinese-born, Western-educated professionals who have returned to a radically transformed city. One morning, in the eighth tower of Lanson Suites, Lina discovers that a childhood keepsake, an ivory bracelet, has gone missing. The incident contributes to a wave of unease that has begun to settle throughout the Zhen household.

What We Were Promised -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/12/2018 - 6:00pm</span>

12

Oct

Science on Paper

Jacki Whisenant

10/12/2018 - 6:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

This talk will look at how science has been visually communicated through the ages, focusing on natural history illustrations and the artists who were major contributors to the field in the age of exploration and onward. Artists from many countries and backgrounds all contribute to the advancement of science through their work, from Maria Sibylla Merian to Edward Tufte and many more. Visual communication itself can cover a broad range: organismal illustrations, habitat descriptions, diagrams, maps, charts, infographics, etc. The possibilities of the field are endless, and the practice of explaining science through art has a strong history and a strong future.

 

Presented in partnership with the Wisconsin Science Festival as part of Science on the Square.

Science on Paper -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/12/2018 - 6:00pm</span>

12

Oct

Storm Lake

Art Cullen

10/12/2018 - 6:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

In 2017 small-town newspaperman Art Cullen won the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Writing. Storm Lake, his first book, is like its namesake city of 15,000 many things. It is an affecting memoir about a family business and what it takes to keep an endangered species of media alive and healthy. It is a valuable reflection on how American farming has changed—and transformed the heartland with it. It is also a fascinating encapsulation of Iowa’s politics and character that could serve as a primer for any political observers with their eye on the next presidential campaign. And perhaps most importantly, Storm Lake is a forward-thinking, hopeful vision of rural America.

Storm Lake -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/12/2018 - 6:00pm</span>

12

Oct

White Dancing Elephants

Chaya Bhuvaneswar

10/12/2018 - 7:00pm

Room of One's Own

In luminous, vivid, searingly honest prose, the stories in White Dancing Elephants center on the experiences of diverse women of color—cunning, bold, and resolute—facing sexual harassment and racial violence, as well as the violence women inflict upon each other. One woman’s miscarriage is juxtaposed against the story of the Buddha’s birth. Another cheats with her best friend’s husband, only to discover it’s her friend she most yearns for. In three different stories, three artists struggle to push courageous works into the world, while a woman with an incurable disease competes with her engineer husband’s beautiful android.

 

Combining the speculative elements and wry psychological realism beloved by readers of Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Margaret Atwood, Danzy Senna and Sandra Cisneros, this collection introduces Chaya Bhuvaneswar as an original and memorable new voice. White Dancing Elephants is the winner of the 2017 Dzanc Books Short Story Collection Prize.

White Dancing Elephants -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/12/2018 - 7:00pm</span>

12

Oct

Where Did You Get This Number?

Anthony Salvanto

10/12/2018 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

CBS News’ Elections and Surveys Director Anthony Salvanto takes you behind the scenes of polling to show you how to think about who we are and where we’re headed as a nation.

 

As Elections and Surveys Director for CBS News, it’s Anthony Salvanto’s job to understand you—what you think and how you vote. He’s the person behind so many of the poll numbers you see today, making the winner calls on election nights and surveying thousands of Americans. In Where Did You Get This Number? A Pollster’s Guide to Making Sense of the World, Salvanto takes readers on a fast-paced, eye-opening tour through the world of polling and elections and what they really show about America today, beyond the who's-up-who’s-down headlines and horse races. Salvanto is just the person to bring much-needed clarity in a time when divisions seem to run so deep.

 

Where Did You Get This Number? -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/12/2018 - 7:30pm</span>

12

Oct

The Radium Girls

Kate Moore

10/12/2018 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

The Curies’ newly discovered element of radium makes gleaming headlines across the nation as the fresh face of beauty, and wonder drug of the medical community. From body lotion to tonic water, the popular new element shines bright in the otherwise dark years of the First World War.

 

Meanwhile, hundreds of girls toil amidst the glowing dust of the radium-dial factories. The glittering chemical covers their bodies from head to toe; they light up the night like industrious fireflies. With such a coveted job, these “shining girls” are the luckiest alive — until they begin to fall mysteriously ill.

 

But the factories that once offered golden opportunities are now ignoring all claims of the gruesome side effects, and the women’s cries of corruption. And as the fatal poison of the radium takes hold, the brave shining girls find themselves embroiled in one of the biggest scandals of America’s early 20th century, and in a groundbreaking battle for workers’ rights that will echo for centuries to come.

The Radium Girls -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/12/2018 - 7:30pm</span>

12

Oct

A Lucky Man

Jamel Brinkley

10/12/2018 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Bubbler

In the nine expansive, searching stories of A Lucky Man, fathers and sons attempt to salvage relationships with friends and family members, and confront mistakes made in the past. An imaginative young boy from the Bronx goes swimming with his group from day camp at a backyard pool in the suburbs, and faces the effects of power and privilege in ways he can barely grasp. A teen intent on proving himself a man through the all-night revel of J’Ouvert can’t help but look out for his impressionable younger brother. And at a capoeira conference, two brothers grapple with how to tell the story of their family, caught in the dance of their painful, fractured history. This stunning debut by Jamel Brinkley reflects the tenderness and vulnerability of black men and boys whose hopes sometimes betray them, especially in a world shaped by race, gender, and class—where luck may be the greatest fiction of all.

A Lucky Man -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/12/2018 - 7:30pm</span>

12

Oct

2018 Charlotte Zolotow Lecture

Benjamin Alire Saenz

10/12/2018 - 7:30pm

Union South - Wisconsin Union - Varsity Hall

Mr. Sáenz is the author of a number of illuminating young adult novels, including Sammy and Juliana in Hollywood;Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, winner of the the Pura Belpré Author Award, the Lambda Literary Award and the Stonewall Award, in addition to being a Printz Award honor book; and The Inexplicable Logic of My Life.

 

The annual Charlotte Zolotow Lecture is a free, public lecture sponsored by the Cooperative Children’s Book Center of the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, with support from the Friends of the CCBC. Books will be available for purchase from A Room of One's Own; a signing will follow the lecture.

2018 Charlotte Zolotow Lecture -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/12/2018 - 7:30pm</span>

13

Oct

Home of the Braves

Patrick Steele

10/13/2018 - 10:30am

Wisconsin Historical Museum

When the struggling Boston Braves relocated to Milwaukee in March 1953, the city went wild for its new baseball team. Soon, the Braves were winning games, drawing bigger crowds than any team but the Brooklyn Dodgers, and turning Hank Aaron, Eddie Mathews, and Warren Spahn into Hall of Famers. Within five years the team would win a World Series and two pennants.

 

It seemed the dawn of a new dynasty. Impassioned fans wore their hearts on their sleeves. Yet in October 1964 team owners made a shocking announcement: the Braves were moving to Atlanta.

 

In the decades since, many have tried to understand why the Braves left Milwaukee. Fans blamed greedy owners and the lure of Coca Cola cash. Team management claimed they weren't getting enough local support. Patrick Steele delves deeply into all facets of the story, looking at the changing business of baseball in the 1960s, the interactions of the team owners with the government officials who controlled County Stadium, the surging success of the Green Bay Packers, and much more, to understand how the "Milwaukee Miracle" went south.

Home of the Braves -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 10:30am</span>

13

Oct

Call Me When You Want to Talk about the Tombstones

Cynthia Marie Hoffman

10/13/2018 - 10:30am

Central Library - The Bubbler

A mother inherits a leather box containing scraps of family papers and photos dating back more than a century. Her daughter joins her on a moving quest to reconstruct their family history. Together they sift through archives and inspect eroded headstones, piecing together their ancestry in order to understand who they are. Elegiac yet spirited, Call Me When You Want to Talk about the Tombstones is a scavenger hunt, a DNA test, a jigsaw puzzle of lineage. Cynthia Marie Hoffman is “a rising star”, a poet of infectious and meticulous vision.

Call Me When You Want to Talk about the Tombstones -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 10:30am</span>

13

Oct

Judy Moody and the Right Royal Tea Party

Megan McDonald

10/13/2018 - 10:30am

Central Library - Children's Section

Judy Moody is in a royal purple-mountain-majesties mood. Make that Majesty with a capital M! With Grandma Lou’s help, Judy has dug up proof that some old-timey Moodys (aka the brave Mudeyes) lived in merry olde England. In fact, if her grandpa’s notes are right, Judy might even be related to — royal fanfare, please — the Queen herself! Should Judy start packing her purple robe for a sleepover at Buckingham Palace? But then Judy’s family tree gets a few more shakes — thanks to her nemesis, Jessica “Fink” Finch — and some more surprises come tumbling out. Crikey! These new gems are not nearly as shiny or sparkly as the crown jewels. Now Judy has some right royal family secrets she’d like to keep hidden away in a dungeon somewhere — and especially away from Jessica, the princess in pink herself!

Judy Moody and the Right Royal Tea Party -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 10:30am</span>

13

Oct

The Gift of Our Wounds

Pardeep Singh Kaleka Arno Michaelis

10/13/2018 - 10:30am

Central Library - Community Rooms 301-302

These are tumultuous times for race relations in America. The President of the United States is routinely accused of being a racist for both his words and his policies. White supremacists are marching in the streets. Hundreds of thousands of Dreamers are being threatened with deportation. In these divisive times, two men from drastically different backgrounds have come together on a mission to stop hate. In The Gift of Our Wounds: A Sikh and a Former White Supremacist Find Forgiveness After Hate, Arno Michaelis and Pardeep Singh Kaleka, with Robin Gaby Fisher, tell the remarkable story of how their friendship grew out of a horrific hate crime. This gut-wrenching book provides a vital understanding of how to combat racism and white supremacists in order to build an inclusive society based on unity and respect.

 

The Gift of Our Wounds -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 10:30am</span>

13

Oct

Fearless Women in SF&F

Mary Robinette Kowal Mirah Bolender K Arsenault Rivera

10/13/2018 - 10:30am

Room of One's Own

Three of the most exciting and, of course, fearless women writing today discuss the state of writing (and reading) Science Fiction and Fantasy.

 

About The Calculating StarsThe Fated Sky: Perfect for fans of the hit book and movie Hidden Figures, this new duology from Mary Robinette Kowal expands on her Hugo Award-winning novelette “Lady Astronaut of Mars.” Following The Calculating Stars, The Fated Sky brings the mathmetician, pilot, and “lady astronaut” Elma York all the way to Mars on her new mission. The Calculating Stars introduced Kowal’s alternate 1950’s America where a meteorite causes a climate cataclysm. The International Aerospace Coalition draws on every available talent to colonize space before the earth becomes uninhabitable  — and Elma York, a WASP pilot and mathematician, makes sure women have the opportunity to become astronauts too. 

 

Fearless Women in SF&F -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 10:30am</span>

13

Oct

Where Honeybees Thrive

Heather Swan

10/13/2018 - 11:00am

Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery - DeLuca Forum

Colony Collapse Disorder, ubiquitous pesticide use, industrial agriculture, habitat reduction—these are just a few of the issues causing unprecedented trauma in honeybee populations worldwide. In this artfully illustrated book, Heather Swan embarks on a narrative voyage to discover solutions to—and understand the sources of—the plight of honeybees.

 

Through a lyrical combination of creative nonfiction and visual imagery, Where Honeybees Thrive tells the stories of the beekeepers, farmers, artists, entomologists, ecologists, and other advocates working to stem the damage and reverse course for this critical pollinator. Using her own quest for understanding as a starting point, Swan highlights the innovative projects and strategies these groups employ. Her mosaic approach to engaging with the environment not only reveals the incredibly complex political ecology in which bees live—which includes human and nonhuman actors alike—but also suggests ways of comprehending and tackling a host of other conflicts between postindustrial society and the natural world. Each chapter closes with an illustrative full-color gallery of bee-related artwork.

 

Where Honeybees Thrive -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 11:00am</span>

13

Oct

Interior States

Meghan O'Gieblyn

10/13/2018 - 12:00pm

Room of One's Own

A fresh, acute, and even profound collection that centers around two core (and related) issues of American identity: faith, in general and the specific forms Christianity takes in particular; and the challenges of living in the Midwest when culture is felt to be elsewhere.

 

Interior States -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 12:00pm</span>

13

Oct

Daughter in Retrograde

Courtney Kersten

10/13/2018 - 12:00pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum

When she isn't eavesdropping on family gossip or gazing at taxidermy squirrels in smoky dives, Courtney Kersten charts the uncertainty of her midwestern homeland by looking to the stars and planets. As a teen she had plunged deep into the worlds of signs, symbols, and prophecy. But as her mother—her traveling companion into these spheres—lies dying, Kersten must learn to navigate without the person who always lit the way. Their last journey together, to swim in a Wisconsin lake, is a bittersweet, darkly comic, poignant climax to this transformative memoir.

Daughter in Retrograde -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 12:00pm</span>

13

Oct

Tommy: My Journey of a Lifetime

Tommy Thompson Doug Moe

10/13/2018 - 12:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301-302

The many facets of Tommy G. Thompson—small-town grocer's son, brash campaigner with a common touch, shrewd political strategist, savvy policy wonk, and ebullient promoter of Wisconsin—come across vividly in these pages. Thompson, with journalist Doug Moe, traces his journey from boyhood to politics to the world stage, including his unprecedented four terms as Wisconsin governor, his service as a cabinet secretary under President George W. Bush, and his continuing work in global efforts to fight AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria.

 

Personal and revealing stories punctuate the biographical details and policy discussions. Here is Tommy as a young man, just happening to be on the National Mall in 1964 when Dr. Martin Luther King told the nation "I have a dream." Here is Tommy as Wisconsin governor, struggling to start a Harley-Davidson motorcycle before leading "a pack of Hell's Republicans" on a ride through the state. Here is Tommy in Washington after the 9/11 attacks, slipping out of a secure bunker (in defiance of orders) to aid the emergency medical response.

 

Tommy: My Journey of a Lifetime -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 12:00pm</span>

13

Oct

Raising the Dad

Tom Matthews

10/13/2018 - 12:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Raising the Dad is a small masterpiece that charts the all-too-familiar forces hastening the decline of the average American family, and in it Tom Matthews has produced a classic novel of modern life.

 

In Raising the Dad, the dysfunction in John Husted’s family is vexing enough: His marriage has slipped into a state of passionless functionality. His teenage daughter is growing distant and mean. His older brother—a washed-up heavy-metal singer—is fresh out of jail, and their mother may be slipping away to dementia. Things just seemed to veer off course since the death of the family patriarch many years earlier.

 

But then John is stunned to learn that his father’s fate was not what he had long believed it to be. It falls upon John to decide if he should break the news to his family, knowing that the truth could make the family whole – or smash it to pieces.

Raising the Dad -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 12:00pm</span>

13

Oct

Play On

Jeff Bercovici

10/13/2018 - 1:00pm

Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery - DeLuca Forum

A lively, deeply reported tour of the science and strategies helping athletes like Tom Brady, Serena Williams, Carli Lloyd, and LeBron James redefine the notion of “peak age.”

 

Season after season, today’s sports superstars seem to defy the limits of physical aging that inevitably sideline their competitors. How much of the difference is genetic destiny and how much can be attributed to better training, medicine and technology? Is athletic longevity a skill that can be taught, or a mental discipline that can be mastered? Can career-ending injuries be predicted and avoided? 

 

Play On -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 1:00pm</span>

13

Oct

Realer Than Real: Writing With All Five Senses

Michelle Wildgen Susanna Daniel

10/13/2018 - 1:30pm

Central Library - First Floor Conference Room

You can’t draw the reader into your world without first creating the world. Madison Writer's Studio founders Michelle Wildgen and Susanna Daniel present a workshop about sensory writing and how to use it in your fiction and nonfiction. We’ll help you pay closer attention to the world-building details you have at your disposal and discuss how to select the most effective and evocative ones. We’ll read brief excerpts to stimulate thinking about language and description, and we’ll discuss how the excerpts work and which words create which effects. Does a passage make us feel queasy or hungry, cozy or anxious? How did this mood affect the way we experienced the story? Finally, we’ll use prompts to get you thinking about all five senses. Participants will have time to write, and some of you will have time to share and discuss your work as well.

 

Registration is required for this event. Online registration will open on Thursday, October 4th. Please visit this webpage or the WBF print schedule for the registration link.

Realer Than Real: Writing With All Five Senses -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 1:30pm</span>

13

Oct

White Kids

Margaret Hagerman

10/13/2018 - 1:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

White Kids, based on two years of research involving in-depth interviews with white kids and their families, is a clear-eyed and sometimes shocking account of how white kids learn about race. In doing so, this book explores questions such as, “How do white kids learn about race when they grow up in families that do not talk openly about race or acknowledge its impact?” and “What about children growing up in families with parents who consider themselves to be ‘anti-racist’?”

 

White Kids -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 1:30pm</span>

13

Oct

Love Wisconsin

Megan Monday Brijetta Hall Waller

10/13/2018 - 1:30pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum

Love Wisconsin is a storytelling project all about the people of Wisconsin. Launched online in 2015, the project captured attention by telling first-person, real-life stories, and publishing them right where people hang out: on social media. As the stories were shared, the audience grew. Love Wisconsin: Stories From The Place We Call Home is a hard-cover, photo forward book containing over 80 of the inspiring voices featured in the project.

Love Wisconsin -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 1:30pm</span>

13

Oct

This Radical Land

Daegan Miller

10/13/2018 - 1:30pm

Room of One's Own

“The American people sees itself advance across the wilderness, draining swamps, straightening rivers, peopling the solitude, and subduing nature,” wrote Alexis de Tocqueville in 1835. That’s largely how we still think of nineteenth-century America today: a country expanding unstoppably, bending the continent’s natural bounty to the national will, heedless of consequence. A country of slavery and of Indian wars. There’s much truth in that vision.

 

This Radical Land -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 1:30pm</span>

13

Oct

The Man Who Caught the Storm

Brantley Hargrove

10/13/2018 - 2:00pm

Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery - Orchard View

At the turn of the twenty-first century, the tornado was one of the last true mysteries of the modern world. It was a monster that ravaged the American heartland a thousand times each year, yet science’s every effort to divine its inner workings had ended in failure. Researchers all but gave up, until the arrival of an outsider.

 

In a field of PhDs, Tim Samaras didn’t attend a day of college in his life. He chased storms with brilliant tools of his own invention and pushed closer to the tornado than anyone else ever dared. When he achieved what meteorologists had deemed impossible, it was as if he had snatched the fire of the gods. Yet even as he transformed the field, Samaras kept on pushing. As his ambitions grew, so did the risks. And when he finally met his match—in a faceoff against the largest tornado ever recorded—it upended everything he thought he knew.

 

The Man Who Caught the Storm -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 2:00pm</span>

13

Oct

The Fall of Wisconsin

Dan Kaufman

10/13/2018 - 3:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301-302

This Wisconsin Book Festival author event is presented in partnership with the Madison Institute and the UW Center for the Humanities.

 

The Fall of Wisconsin -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 3:00pm</span>

13

Oct

Once a Professor: A Memoir of Teaching in Turbulent Times

Jerry Apps

10/13/2018 - 3:00pm

Wisconsin Historical Museum

Farm boy professor and celebrated rural historian shares the life lessons he learned and the history he witnessed as a University of Wisconsin Extension Agent and UW-Madison professor during 1960s, 70s and beyond in his new memoir Once a Professor: A Memoir of Teaching in Turbulent Times.

 

In this continuation of the Apps life story begun in his childhood memoir Limping through Life, Wisconsin's celebrated rural storyteller shares stories from his years at the University of Wisconsin-Madison from 1957 to 1995, when he left the university to lecture and write fulltime. During those years Apps experienced the turmoil of protests and riots at the UW in the 1960s, the struggles of the tenure process and faculty governance, and the ever-present pressure to secure funding for academic research and programs.

 

"I never wanted to be a professor," writes Jerry Apps in the introduction to Once a Professor. Yet a series of unexpected events and unplanned experiences put him on an unlikely path--and led to a thirty-eight-year career at the University of Wisconsin.

 

Once a Professor: A Memoir of Teaching in Turbulent Times -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 3:00pm</span>

13

Oct

Lost Connections

Johann Hari

10/13/2018 - 3:00pm

Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery - DeLuca Forum

Depression and anxiety are now the most common mental illnesses in the US, affecting 18 percent of the population. Almost one in six Americans is now taking a drug for these or related disorders. A deeply researched new book asks: what if we have been radically misunderstanding these problems for more than a generation—and missing the real solutions?

 

New York Times bestselling author Johann Hari radicalized the addiction debate with his acclaimed book Chasing the Scream and accompanying TED talk—which, along with the animation based on it, has been viewed more than 21 million times. He has now carried out a bold three-year investigation about what really causes depression and anxiety, and how to actually solve these disorders.

 

Lost Connections -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 3:00pm</span>

13

Oct

The Power of Presence

Joy Thomas Moore

10/13/2018 - 3:00pm

Room of One's Own

As the mother of Wes Moore, whose memoir about overcoming the obstacles that face a fatherless young black man was a huge bestseller, Joy is constantly asked: How did you do it? How can you be a good parent, have a career and stay healthy when you don’t have a partner to pick up the slack? How do you connect with a child when you can’t always be there? Joy’s answer is “presence.” Specifically, seven different ways of being a force in a child’s life, ensuring that they feel your influence. We can’t always be physically there for our children, but the power of presence can help us to be a voice in the back of their minds that guides them through difficult times. 

 

In The Power of Presence, Moore explores seven pillars of presence–heart, faith, mind, courage, financial freedom, values, and connectedness–that all parents can use to positively influence their children. Using compelling stories from women who have been there and practical advice on everything from savings accounts to mindfulness, this book is a compassionate look at what it takes to raise great kids even in less than ideal circumstances.

The Power of Presence -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 3:00pm</span>

13

Oct

Severance

Ling Ma

10/13/2018 - 3:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

Candace Chen, a millennial drone self-sequestered in a Manhattan office tower, is devoted to routine. With the recent passing of her Chinese immigrant parents, she’s had her fill of uncertainty. She’s content just to carry on: She goes to work, troubleshoots the teen-targeted Gemstone Bible, watches movies in a Greenpoint basement with her boyfriend.

 

So Candace barely notices when a plague of biblical proportions sweeps New York. Then Shen Fever spreads. Families flee. Companies halt operations. The subways squeak to a halt. Her bosses enlist her as part of a dwindling skeleton crew with a big end-date payoff. Soon entirely alone, still unfevered, she photographs the eerie, abandoned city as the anonymous blogger NY Ghost.

 

Candace won’t be able to make it on her own forever, though. Enter a group of survivors, led by the power-hungry IT tech Bob. They’re traveling to a place called the Facility, where, Bob promises, they will have everything they need to start society anew. But Candace is carrying a secret she knows Bob will exploit. Should she escape from her rescuers?

 

Severance -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 3:00pm</span>

13

Oct

Wisconsin State Parks

Scott Spoolman

10/13/2018 - 4:00pm

Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery - DeLuca Forum

Wisconsin State Parks connects geologic processes to the current landscape, taking a dramatic and historic look at northwestern Wisconsin’s volcanoes, at the glacial masses that flattened and molded northern Wisconsin, at mountain ranges that rose up and wore away over hundreds of millions of years, and at many other bedrock-shaping phenomena. These stories, as well as to the evolution of flora and fauna and development of human settlement and activities, for a deeper understanding of our state's natural history.

Wisconsin State Parks -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 4:00pm</span>

13

Oct

Indictus

Natalie Eilbert

10/13/2018 - 4:30pm

Room of One's Own

Poetry. Women's Studies. Indictus re-imagines various creation myths to bear the invisible and unsaid assaults of women. In doing so, it subverts notions of patriarchal power into a genre that can be demolished and set again. Indictus is a Latin word, from which other words like "indict" and "indicate" are born. It translates literally as "to write the unsaid." There is an effort in this book to create the supernatural through the utterance of violence, because jurisdiction fails in real time. That sexual assault can so easily become a science fiction when power is rearranged to serve the victim speaks to the abject lack of control within victims to ever be redeemed. Crimes resolve to misdemeanors. In a world without my abusers, how can I soon become myself? Combining the mythological and autobiographical, this book attempts to indict us, so that the wounded might one day be free.

Indictus -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 4:30pm</span>

13

Oct

Consent on Campus

Donna Freitas

10/13/2018 - 4:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301-302

A 2015 survey of twenty-seven elite colleges found that twenty-three percent of respondents reported personal experiences of sexual misconduct on their campuses. That figure has not changed since the 1980s, when people first began collecting data on sexual violence. What has changed is the level of attention that the American public is paying to these statistics. Reports of sexual abuse repeatedly make headlines, and universities are scrambling to address the crisis.

 

Consent on Campus -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 4:30pm</span>

13

Oct

Everyone Knows You Go Home

Natalia Sylvester

10/13/2018 - 4:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

The first time Isabel meets her father-in-law, Omar, he’s already dead—an apparition appearing uninvited on her wedding day. Her husband, Martin, still unforgiving for having been abandoned by his father years ago, confesses that he never knew the old man had died. So Omar asks Isabel for the impossible: persuade Omar’s family—especially his wife, Elda—to let him redeem himself.

 

Isabel and Martin settle into married life in a Texas border town, and Omar returns each year on the celebratory Day of the Dead. Every year Isabel listens, but to the aggrieved Martin and Elda, Omar’s spirit remains invisible. Through his visits, Isabel gains insight into not just the truth about his disappearance and her husband’s childhood but also the ways grief can eat away at love. When Martin’s teenage nephew crosses the Mexican border and takes refuge in Isabel and Martin’s home, questions about past and future homes, borders, and belonging arise that may finally lead to forgiveness—and alter all their lives forever.

Everyone Knows You Go Home -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 4:30pm</span>

13

Oct

American Wolf

Nate Blakeslee

10/13/2018 - 5:00pm

Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery - DeLuca Forum

Before men ruled the earth, there were wolves. Once abundant in North America, these majestic creatures were hunted to near extinction in the lower 48 states by the 1920s. But in recent decades, conservationists have brought wolves back to the Rockies, igniting a battle over the very soul of the West.

 

With novelistic detail, Nate Blakeslee tells the gripping story of one of these wolves, O-Six, a charismatic alpha female named for the year of her birth. Uncommonly powerful, with gray fur and faint black ovals around each eye, O-Six is a kind and merciful leader, a fiercely intelligent fighter, and a doting mother. She is beloved by wolf watchers, particularly renowned naturalist Rick McIntyre, and becomes something of a social media star, with followers around the world.

 

But as she raises her pups and protects her pack, O-Six is challenged on all fronts: by hunters, who compete with wolves for the elk they both prize; by cattle ranchers who are losing livestock and have the ear of politicians; and by other Yellowstone wolves who are vying for control of the park’s stunningly beautiful Lamar Valley.

 

American Wolf -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 5:00pm</span>

13

Oct

Paris by the Book

Liam Callanan

10/13/2018 - 6:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

A missing person, a grieving family, a curious clue: a half-finished manuscript set in Paris. Once a week, I chase men who are not my husband. . . . 

 

When eccentric novelist Robert Eady abruptly vanishes, he leaves behind his wife, Leah, their daughters, and, hidden in an unexpected spot, plane tickets to Paris. Hoping to uncover clues--and her husband--Leah sets off for France with her girls. Upon their arrival, she discovers an unfinished manuscript, one Robert had been writing without her knowledge . . . and that he had set in Paris. The Eady girls follow the path of the manuscript to a small, floundering English-language bookstore whose weary proprietor is eager to sell. Leah finds herself accepting the offer on the spot.

 

Paris by the Book -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 6:00pm</span>

13

Oct

The World in a Grain

Vince Beiser

10/13/2018 - 6:00pm

Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery - DeLuca Forum

The gripping story of the most important overlooked commodity in the world--sand--and the crucial role it plays in our lives.

 

After water and air, sand is the natural resource that we consume more than any other--even more than oil. Every concrete building and paved road on Earth, every computer screen and silicon chip, is made from sand. From Egypt's pyramids to the Hubble telescope, from the world's tallest skyscraper to the sidewalk below it, from Chartres' stained-glass windows to your iPhone, sand shelters us, empowers us, engages us, and inspires us. It's the ingredient that makes possible our cities, our science, our lives--and our future.

 

And, incredibly, we're running out of it.

 

The World in a Grain -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 6:00pm</span>

13

Oct

Good and Mad

Rebecca Traister

10/13/2018 - 6:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301-302

From Rebecca Traister, the New York Times bestselling author of All the Single Ladies—whom Anne Lamott called “the most brilliant voice on feminism in this country”—comes a vital, incisive exploration into the transformative power of female anger and its ability to transcend into a political movement.

 

Good and Mad -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 6:00pm</span>

13

Oct

Milk!

Mark Kurlansky

10/13/2018 - 7:00pm

Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery - DeLuca Forum

Mark Kurlansky's first global food history since the bestselling Cod and Salt; the fascinating cultural, economic, and culinary story of milk and all things dairy--with recipes throughout. 

 

According to the Greek creation myth, we are so much spilt milk; a splatter of the goddess Hera's breast milk became our galaxy, the Milky Way. But while mother's milk may be the essence of nourishment, it is the milk of other mammals that humans have cultivated ever since the domestication of animals more than 10,000 years ago, originally as a source of cheese, yogurt, kefir, and all manner of edible innovations that rendered lactose digestible, and then, when genetic mutation made some of us lactose-tolerant, milk itself. 

 

Milk! -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 7:00pm</span>

13

Oct

While I Have Your Attention

John Roach

10/13/2018 - 7:30pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

For the last 25 years, writer and storyteller John Roach has held court on the back page of Madison Magazine. With musings on everything from politics and religion to family and cabin life to sports and his many obsessions—music, technology, books, weather, and hometown Madison—Roach has entertained and occasionally enraged readers with often witty and always astute observations on life as he sees it. John published another collection, Way Out Here in the Middle, in 2003. In this second edition of his greatest hits, Roach shares a collection of some of his favorite and most popular columns, which reveal as much about his edgy irreverence as they do of his soulful sentiment.

While I Have Your Attention -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 7:30pm</span>

13

Oct

One Person, No Vote & White Rage

Carol Anderson

10/13/2018 - 7:30pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301-302

In her New York Times bestseller White Rage, Carol Anderson laid bare an insidious history of policies that have systematically impeded black progress in America, from 1865 to our combustible present. With One Person, No Vote, she chronicles a related history: the rollbacks to African American participation in the vote since the 2013 Supreme Court decision that eviscerated the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Known as the Shelby ruling, this decision effectively allowed districts with a demonstrated history of racial discrimination to change voting requirements without approval from the Department of Justice.

 

One Person, No Vote & White Rage -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 7:30pm</span>

13

Oct

Gastropod Live!

Cynthia Graber Nicola Twilley

10/13/2018 - 8:00pm

Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery - DeLuca Forum

Are oysters really are an aphrodisiac? Can you hack your tastebuds? When did carrots become orange? In this special live performance of the podcast Gastropod, co-hosts Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley will serve up a three-course feast for your eyes and ears. From live experiments to interactive tastings, the evening will combine special guests and field recordings to reveal the history and science behind the food we eat every day. Gastropod is the award-winning podcast that looks at food through the lens of science and history.

 

Presented in partnership with the Wisconsin Science Festival.

Gastropod Live! -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 8:00pm</span>

13

Oct

BookMarks

Chloe Benjamin Mark Kurlansky Natalia Sylvester Rebecca Traister

10/13/2018 - 9:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301 & 302

To the Best of Our Knowledge's BookMarks presents true stories of people marked by books. BookMarks are stories mined from our secret lives as readers. Stories of intimate relationships and life-changing encounters with books. Stories about the books we can’t forget. Join TTBOOK host, Anne Strainchamps, for a live literary event featuring Wisconsin Book Festival authors, Chloe Benjamin, Mark Kurlansky, Natalia Sylvester, and Rebecca Traister. Our panel of authors will read a passage from their favorite book, discuss how that book affected their lives, and talk to Anne about their relationship with books as readers and writers.

BookMarks -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/13/2018 - 9:00pm</span>

14

Oct

The Lake Michigan Cottage Cookbook

Amelia Levin

10/14/2018 - 10:30am

Central Library - The Bubbler

This collection of 118 recipes captures the evocative food experiences of the Lake Michigan region, an ultimate vacation destination with hundreds of miles of shoreline and rich food traditions reflecting the bounty of the area’s farms and the lake’s daily catch. Recipes include Helen Suchy’s Apple Cake from Door County, Homemade Sheboygan-Style Bratwurst, Chicago’s HBFC Original Fried Chicken Sandwich, Beach House Cheesy Potatoes from Northwest Indiana, and The Cook’s House Crispy Skinned Lake Trout from Traverse City. Delightful photographs of cottage life and classic destinations, along with profiles of favorite food purveyors, bring the lakeshore’s flavors and charm to you year-round, wherever you are.

The Lake Michigan Cottage Cookbook -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/14/2018 - 10:30am</span>

14

Oct

My Own Devices

Dessa

10/14/2018 - 10:30am

Central Library - Community Rooms 301

Dessa defies category--she is an intellectual with an international rap career and an inhaler in her backpack; a creative writer fascinated by philosophy and behavioral science; and a funny, charismatic performer dogged by blue moods and heartache. She's ferocious on stage and endearingly neurotic in the tour van. Her stunning literary debut memoir stitches together poignant insights on love, science, and language--a demonstration of just how far the mind can travel while the body is on a six-hour ride to the next gig. 

 

My Own Devices -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/14/2018 - 10:30am</span>

14

Oct

Living the Sutras: A Guide to Yoga Wisdom Beyond the Mat

Amy Pearce-Hayden Kelly DiNardo

10/14/2018 - 10:30am

Central Library - Madison Room

Yoga is as much a spiritual practice as it is a physical one, and the core of the ancient philosophy is inscribed in the nearly 200 aphorisms that comprise the Yoga Sutras. Written some two thousand years ago by the guru Pantajali, these texts offer timeless wisdom on how to live a joyful, purposeful life. In this accessible, engaging handbook to the Sutras, Kelly DiNardo and Amy Pearce-Hayden group the works thematically, offers brief commentary, and provides writing prompts for deeper and more personal reflection on this path to enlightenment. In this talk, DiNardo and Pearce-Hayden will offer a brief intro the sutras, share tangible, science-backed exercises from the book and lead you through a guided meditation.

Living the Sutras: A Guide to Yoga Wisdom Beyond the Mat -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/14/2018 - 10:30am</span>

14

Oct

Big Game

Mark Leibovich David Maraniss

10/14/2018 - 10:30am

Central Library - Community Room 302

Mark Leibovich, chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine, will discuss his new book, Big Game, in conversation with David Maraniss. Mark and David will explore politics, football, and the inevitable intersection of the two in today's heated cultural atmosphere. In a wide-ranging interview, Leibovich will address the multitude of scandals, traditions, and movements that have all come to bear on the NFL just as it reached the pinnacle of American sports and culture.

 

Big Game -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/14/2018 - 10:30am</span>

14

Oct

Joyful

Ingrid Fetell Lee

10/14/2018 - 12:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

A groundbreaking look at how small changes to our surroundings can lead us to happier, healthier, more fulfilling lives. Have you ever wondered why we stop to watch the orange glow that arrives before sunset, or why we flock to see cherry blossoms bloom in spring? Is there a reason that people -- regardless of gender, age, culture, or ethnicity -- are mesmerized by infants, and can't help but smile when they see a burst of confetti or a cluster of colorful balloons. 

 

We are often taught that our external environment has little or no impact on our inner joy. Increasingly, experts urge us to find balance and calm by looking inward - through mindfulness or meditation - and muting the outside world. But what if the natural vibrancy of our surroundings is actually our most renewable and easily accessible joy? 

 

Joyful -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/14/2018 - 12:00pm</span>

14

Oct

Celebrating Wisconsin People

Fabu Kim Blaeser Max Garland Denise Sweet Karla Huston Marilyn Taylor

10/14/2018 - 12:00pm

Central Library - The Bubbler

The 2019 Wisconsin Fellowship of Poets calendar is unique because, for the first time, the poetry editor is African American. This year's calendar is the most inclusive book of poetry WFOP has ever published with poems from every ethnicity living in Wisconsin, including poems written in both Spanish and English. Additionally, every living Wisconsin Poet Laureate has a poem included in the 2019 publication. In collaboration with the Wisconsin Historical Society, there are photographs from the Society's archives that illustrate multiracial communities form Wisconsin’s past.  This collection celebrates all Wisconsin people with a signification section of poems that also focuses on those of German, Irish, Scottish, Scandinavian and other European heritages. The reading will gather State and local poets laureate to celebrate the poetry and people of Wisconsin.

 

Celebrating Wisconsin People -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/14/2018 - 12:00pm</span>

14

Oct

Summer Hours at the Robber's LIbrary

Sue Halpern

10/14/2018 - 12:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 301

People are drawn to libraries for all kinds of reasons. Most come for the books themselves, of course; some come to borrow companionship. For head librarian, Kit, the public library in Riverton, New Hampshire, offers what she craves most: peace. Here, no one expects Kit to talk about the calamitous events that catapulted her out of what she thought was a settled, suburban life. She can simply submerge herself in her beloved books and try to forget her problems. But that changes when fifteen-year-old, homeschooled Sunny gets arrested for shoplifting a dictionary. The judge throws the book at Sunny--literally--assigning her to do community service at the library for the summer. Bright, curious, and eager to connect with someone other than her off-the-grid hippie parents, Sunny coaxes Kit out of her self-imposed isolation. They’re joined by Rusty, a Wall Street high-flyer suddenly crashed to earth.

 

Summer Hours at the Robber's LIbrary -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/14/2018 - 12:00pm</span>

14

Oct

NBF Presents Making Sense of One Another: Literature and Connection

Karen Bender Chris Bachelder

10/14/2018 - 1:30pm

Central Library - Community Room 301 & 302

In a country deeply divided by geography, politics, income, and so many other things, join the National Book Foundation at the Wisconsin Book Festival for an invigorating panel with National Book Award honored authors, exploring how fiction helps us to understand ourselves, our neighbors, and the world around us. Featuring 2015 National Book Award Fiction Finalists Karen Bender and Chris Bachelder. 

 

NBF Presents comprises multiple series of author panels and book talks that focus on literature and its relationship to cultural issues and themes. This effort represents a major push to create wider programming that is able to serve a far larger and diverse population of readers. The Foundation will partner with libraries, colleges, festivals, conferences, schools, and performance venues to build comprehensive and accessible programming that brings National Book Awards authors and other acclaimed literary and academic figures to communities across America. 

NBF Presents Making Sense of One Another: Literature and Connection -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/14/2018 - 1:30pm</span>

16

Oct

Virgil Wander

Leif Enger

10/16/2018 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Room 302

Leif Enger, the author of the extraordinary and magical New York Times bestseller, Peace Like a River, returns with an enchanting and timeless story that follows the inhabitants of a small Midwestern town in their quest to revive it’s flagging heart.

 

Midwestern movie house owner Virgil Wander is “cruising along at medium altitude” when his car flies off the road into icy Lake Superior. Virgil survives but his language and memory are altered and he emerges into a world no longer familiar to him. Awakening in this new life, Virgil begins to piece together his personal history and the lore of his broken town, with the help of a cast of affable and curious locals—from Rune, a twinkling, pipe-smoking, kite-flying stranger investigating the mystery of his disappeared son; to Nadine, the reserved, enchanting wife of the vanished man, to Tom, a journalist and Virgil’s oldest friend; and various members of the Pea family who must confront tragedies of their own. Into this community returns a shimmering prodigal son who may hold the key to reviving their town.

 

Virgil Wander -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/16/2018 - 7:00pm</span>

16

Oct

Go Big Read: The Death and Life in the Great Lakes

Dan Egan

10/16/2018 - 7:00pm

Memorial Union - Shannon Hall

Presented in partnership with Go Big Read, Dan Egan visits the Wisconsin Book Festival to discuss his book The Death and Life in the Great Lakes.

 

The Death and Life in the Great Lakes is an ode to the majesty and history of this national, natural treasure. Egan, a master reporter and storyteller, begins with European explorers arriving at these shores for the first time in the 1600s. Egan takes the reader deep beneath the lakes’ shimmering surface to illuminate the ongoing and unparalleled ecological unraveling of the continent’s most precious natural resource, all while retaining a sense of awe and respect for their immensity and danger: “A Great Lake can swallow freighters almost three times the length of a football field; the lakes’ bottoms are littered with an estimated 6,000 shipwrecks, many of which have never been found. This would never happen on a normal lake, because a normal lake is knowable. A Great Lake can hold all the mysteries of an ocean, and then some.”

 

Go Big Read: The Death and Life in the Great Lakes -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/16/2018 - 7:00pm</span>

26

Oct

We Can't Breathe

Jabari Asim

10/26/2018 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Community Rooms 301-302

In We Can't Breathe, Jabari Asim disrupts what Toni Morrison has exposed as the "Master Narrative" and replaces it with a story of black survival and persistence through art and community. In eight wide-ranging and penetrating essays, he explores such topics as the twisted legacy of jokes and falsehoods in black life; the importance of black fathers and community; the significance of black writers and stories; and the beauty and pain of the black body. What emerges is a rich portrait of a community and culture that resisted, survived and flourished despite centuries of racism, violence, and trauma. These thought-provoking essays present a different side of American history, one that doesn't depend on a narrative steeped in oppression bur rather reveals black voices telling their own stories.

We Can't Breathe -  - <span class="date-display-single">10/26/2018 - 7:00pm</span>

12

Nov

The Library Book

Susan Orlean

11/12/2018 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Madison Room

At the 2018 Cheryl Rosen Weston Memorial Lecture, Susan Orlean, hailed as a “national treasure” by The Washington Post and the acclaimed bestselling author of Rin Tin Tin and The Orchid Thief, reopens the unsolved mystery of the most catastrophic library fire in American history, and delivers a dazzling love letter to a beloved institution—our libraries.

 

On the morning of April 29, 1986, a fire alarm sounded in the Los Angeles Public Library. As the moments passed, the patrons and staff who had been cleared out of the building realized this was not the usual false alarm. As one fireman recounted later, “Once that first stack got going, it was Goodbye, Charlie.” The fire was disastrous: It reached 2,000 degrees and burned for more than seven hours. By the time it was extinguished, it had consumed 400,000 books and damaged 700,000 more. Investigators descended on the scene, but over thirty years later, the mystery remains: Did someone purposefully set fire to the library—and if so, who?

 

The Library Book -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/12/2018 - 7:00pm</span>

14

Nov

The Splendor Before the Dark

Margaret George

11/14/2018 - 6:00pm

Room of One's Own

Ascending to the throne was only the beginning... Now Margaret George, the author of The Confessions of Young Nero, weaves a web of politics and passion, as ancient Rome's most infamous emperor cements his place in history. With the beautiful and cunning Poppaea at his side, Nero Augustus commands the Roman empire, ushering in an unprecedented era of artistic and cultural splendor. Although he has yet to produce an heir, his power is unquestioned. But in the tenth year of his reign, a terrifying prophecy comes to pass and a fire engulfs Rome, reducing entire swaths of the city to rubble. Rumors of Nero's complicity in the blaze start to sow unrest among the populace--and the politicians... 

 

The Splendor Before the Dark -  - <span class="date-display-single">11/14/2018 - 6:00pm</span>

01

Dec

The Snowy Nap

Jan Brett

12/01/2018 - 10:00am

Central Library - Children's Section

With over 42 million books in print, Jan Brett’s exquisite art is universally recognized as being among the finest in children’s books today. For over 30 years she has brought the glories of winter to millions of youngsters, their teachers, and parents.

 

The Snowy Nap, a prequel to the all-time classic bestselling picture book, The Hat, stars Hedgie, Brett’s trademark character. Inspired by his friends’ tales of their marvelous past winter adventures, he is determined not to sleep through all the fun again. Hedgie is dazzled by seeing the icy chicken coop sparkling like a palace, the frozen pond shining like a mirror, and the tinkling of sleigh bells. Readers will delight in Brett’s return to the Danish farm on the island of Funen. And Readers will be charmed by her meticulous and detailed illustrations, from the local houses with thatched roofs to the beautiful birch bark flourishes on every page.

The Snowy Nap -  - <span class="date-display-single">12/01/2018 - 10:00am</span>

05

Dec

Ghosts in the Schoolyard

Eve Ewing

12/05/2018 - 7:00pm

Central Library - Madison Room

In the spring of 2013, approximately 12,000 children in Chicago received notice that their last day of school would be not only the final day of the year, but also the final day of their school’s very existence. The nation’s third-largest school district would eventually shutter 53 schools, citing budget limitations, building underutilization, and concerns about academic performance. Of the thousands of displaced students, 94% were low-income and 88% were African-American, leading critics to accuse district CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett and Mayor Rahm Emanuel of racism. “[The mayor] says that he wants to turn around the city of Chicago, make a new Chicago,” one activist told a reporter. “Does that new Chicago mean no black folks? Where are people going to go?”

 

Ghosts in the Schoolyard -  - <span class="date-display-single">12/05/2018 - 7:00pm</span>
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